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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Daldy and Halsey streets are two of the three key north-south connections in Wynyard Quarter. Running between Fanshawe Street and Jellicoe Street. The Daldy Street ‘park axis’ is an important urban design project for the quarter introducing a civic scaled, green landscape connection between Victoria Park (south) and a future Headland open space (north). Waterfront Auckland is seeking resource consent for the revitalisation of these streets from Auckland Council. Stage 1 of the project will see the revitalisation from Pakenham Street north towards the water’s edge. Stage 2 will see the revitalisation of the streets between Fanshawe and Pakenham streets.

DALDY STREET

Daldy Street Linear Park will be established by extending the Daldy Street axis between Fanshawe Street and Point Park. The park will provide a strategic route for passenger transport, pedestrians and cyclists through the Wynyard Quarter as well as recreational and social space. The park and street will be activated by adjacent retail and commercial activity within the Wynyard Quarter. The Daldy Street project is conceived as a civic scaled, continuous and green corridor that links a series of interconnected landscape ‘rooms’ which correspond with the four city blocks the park passes through. Each of these rooms: ‘garden’, ‘park’, industry’ and ‘market’ reveal an element of the site's unique waterfront location, history and character. The use of both ‘continuous’ landscape elements and a series of landscape ‘events’ articulates a journey from ‘land’ in the south to the ‘sea’ in the north.











THE "STREET"

The "street" zone provides a clearly defined vehicular and pedestrian corridor in a continuous alignment between Fanshawe and Jellicoe Streets (and further north-wards in future as envisaged by the Plan Change/Urban Design Framework). The street will accommodate movement and access to the Quarter and include the waterfront tram, bus services, private vehicles, on street carparking as well as walking and cycling. A kerb-less ‘shared surface’ street design supports slow vehicle speeds, pedestrian priority and a high degree of connectivity with existing and future development sites.

KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS INCLUDE:
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a 3.5m wide asphalt carriageway in each direction
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indented 2.5m wide carparking bays within a densely planted avenue of street trees and bio-retention rain gardens
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a kerb-less ‘shared surface’ that supports shared use of the street and low impact design
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4m wide concrete footpaths with a high quality finishes
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new energy efficient LED street lighting
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a cohesive suite of urban furniture elements
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the introduction of a 30km/h speed limit is proposed to make the street more pedestrian friendly

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FEATURES INCLUDE:
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recycled concrete and aggregates
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a low impact stormwater design strategy which treats run-off from the street, park and adjacent development sites
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native planting
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energy efficient LED street lighting and best practice lighting control systems


THE "PARK"

The "park" zone incorporates slow meandering circulation routes, sculptural lawn areas and informal drifts of tree planting. It features a combination of planted and lawn spaces that provide opportunities for sitting and passing the time and good quality footpaths and crossings that are easy to navigate. The park zone is activated by social seating areas, play elements and a series of "tank follies" that perform both environmental and activation functions within the park system. The design elements and materials reflect the site's post-industrial and marine character and provide continuity with recently completed projects in Silo Park, Jellicoe Steet and Karanga Plaza. A key aspect of the Daldy Street project is the completion of the street grid by extending a new piece of road through the former Mobil site between Madden Street and Pakenham Street.

KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS INCLUDE:
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a 4m wide shared footpath for pedestrians and cyclists which provides the primary ‘walkway’ along the length of the street
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a system of swales and rain gardens planted with native plants that incorporate stormwater treatment and overland flow
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a secondary meandering path network
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a 12-14m wide undulating park topography with drifts of planting and trees
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a suite of bespoke park furniture that references the industrial character of the quarter
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a series of tank ‘follies’ with both environmental and activation functions

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FEATURES INCLUDE:
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recycled concrete and aggregates
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a low impact stormwater design strategy which treats run-off from the street, park and adjacent development sites
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native planting
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new energy efficient LED street lighting and control systems
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the re-use of industrial archaeology recovered from the site
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sustainably sourced timber and low embodied energy materials
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
HALSEY STREET

This project provides the opportunity to revitalise Halsey Street as a true waterfront street which:

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prioritises pedestrian access and amenity
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integrates with and enhances the existing Viaduct Harbour pedestrian promenade
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connects land and water
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provides a meaningful and memorable connection between land and sea next to the existing Log Farm basin
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supports the anticipated future uses









DESIGN ELEMENTS INCLUDE:
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one 3.5m lane in each direction north of Pakenham Street
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indented carparking between a densely planted Pohutukawa avenue and bio-retention rain-gardens
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generous footpaths (4.3 – 6.7m wide) with high quality concrete finishes
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a 2.5m wide viewing deck over the water at the existing Log Farm basin
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integration with existing character buildings and the proposed hotel, ASB theatre and Wynyard Central developments


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FEATURES INCLUDE:
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recycled concrete and aggregates
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a low impact stormwater design strategy which treats run-off from the street, park and adjacent development sites
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a native planting palette
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new energy efficient LED street lighting and control systems
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sustainably sourced timber and low embodied energy materials
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the retention of key character elements including Julian’s Wall


PLANS:


HALSEY 1 by Urban+Explorer, on Flickr


HALSEY 2 by Urban+Explorer, on Flickr


HALSEY 3 by Urban+Explorer, on Flickr​
 

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This will have a much greater impact on Wynyard Quarter than Jellicoe Street (although Jellicoe Street will continue to get most of the attention). This is because the majority of the new buildings will be fronting these two streets and the two cross streets.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have had a good look at this - again - and I am starting to feel better about it now. I never realised how broad the park is going to be and it provides more than enough room for cyclists and pedestrians. Also, I think that they have learned from their mistakes in Jellicoe Street, there isn't much parking at all :cheers: Future plans also include a pedestrian bridge from Victoria Park over Fanshawe Street and into Daldy Street. Speaking of which, has anybody heard about the new bus terminus planned for Fanshawe Street ?

The future Laneway is probably for the new canal district that will be constructed at The Innovation Precinct ?
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wynyard for walkers​


Designers of Auckland's new Wynyard Quarter precinct are planning to make the waterfront area pedestrian friendly. Vehicles will be limited to 30km/h, walkers given priority and green areas connected to wide footpaths with street-side areas of vegetation. Many apartment blocks are planned. John Dalzell, chief executive of Waterfront Auckland, said the east-west axis which runs from Westhaven to the Viaduct Harbour had been established with the opening of areas such as Silo Park, Karanga Plaza and North Wharf. Dalzell said the next challenge was to improve the north-south connections so Victoria Park was linked to the area's headland open space and the waterfront. The revitalisation of Halsey St and Daldy St would begin next February, he said.
 

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Is it just me or do you want from this development? I like lot's of aspects of it but to me it could be anywhere in the world. Nothing to stamp this is AUCKLAND. Would love to see some technology incorporated in the actual urban design if this is the innovation precinct. Something world leading.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Is it just me or do you want from this development? I like lot's of aspects of it but to me it could be anywhere in the world. Nothing to stamp this is AUCKLAND. Would love to see some technology incorporated in the actual urban design if this is the innovation precinct. Something world leading.
It definitely leaves me wanting for more but I am going to try to get more info before I make my final judgement ... stay tuned :)
 

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Is it just me or do you want from this development? I like lot's of aspects of it but to me it could be anywhere in the world. Nothing to stamp this is AUCKLAND. Would love to see some technology incorporated in the actual urban design if this is the innovation precinct. Something world leading.
We could shove a motorway through it if you like :lol:.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Streets ahead on waterfront revamp

Two streets on Auckland's waterfront are in line for a fresh look as part of Waterfront Auckland work. Construction will start in February on Daldy and Halsey streets which run parallel to one another and link to Silo Park and Jellicoe St along the water's edge. "The transformation of the streets is just part of a wider urban design framework for the area that was created in 2007," Waterfront Auckland chief executive John Dalzell says. Development is taking place along two axes, an east-west alignment and a north-south one. Mr Dalzell says the east-west development is the one that came into being with the public buildings and spaces that opened in August 2011. The north-south one is a park axis running from Victoria Park to the planned Headland Park where the tank farm is now, he says. "In this way the revitalisation of Daldy and Halsey streets are key parts. By making the streets more pedestrian-friendly and more desirable public spaces, it's hoped the streets will go from being arterial routes to areas which form part of a vibrant mixed community that will eventually inhabit this area."

Based on visitors to the kiosk in Karanga Plaza, 4500 people are estimated to flock to Wynyard Quarter on a normal week. "During a sunny day this can build up to more than 100 an hour." "For an event such as the Laneway Festival, we had 40,000 people through," Mr Dalzell says. Work will be done in stages and is expected to take 18 months, starting with Halsey St north and Daldy St north. The new street designs will support slow vehicle speeds, wider footpaths, green spaces, street furniture and a kerbless shared surface road design. Mr Dalzell says stage two will see work start on Halsey and Daldy between Fanshawe and Pakenham streets. Daldy St is to be transformed into a "linear park" that "combines a landscaped, green connection between Victoria Park and the future Wynyard Quarter headland open space with a route for passenger transport, pedestrians and cyclists". A 2.5m viewing deck is also planned for Halsey St to let people get closer to the water's edge near the old log farm basin. Mr Dalzell will not say how much the upgrades will cost but that they are funded by Waterfront Auckland.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
4500 per week? That seems very low. "Flock" is not the verb I'd choose to describe such a pedestrian count. :lol:
It sounds low, very low indeed - somebody wasn't good at their math ;) Rainy days are a lot quieter and the sunny day count sounds a lot more realistic :)
 
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