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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apartment tower in the works next to historic Dallas High School downtown

The developer who saved downtown's historic Dallas High School is working on a new project next door.

Developer Jack Matthews just completed the $50 million conversion of the more than a century old school at Pearl and Bryan streets into first-class office space. Architect Perkins + Will and other businesses will occupy the landmark.

Now Matthews and his partners are working on a plans to build a high-rise apartment that would include homes for moderate and low-income residents.


The $70 million, 16-story building at 2400 Bryan will have 230 apartments — 110 of which are reserved for residents earning between 30 and 60 percent of the area's median household income, according to filings with Dallas' office of economic development.

"The project also includes approximately 400 parking garage spaces and 10,000 square feet of retail," the economic development filing says. "The project will break ground in early 2019."

Developer Matthews has already done one very successful workforce housing apartment community in the downtown area — the $24 million, 164-unit, 5-story apartment community on Belleview Street in the Cedars neighborhood.

"Our strong belief is that downtown really needs more housing options and this could be a great addition," Matthews said. "Having teachers and police, etc., living in the city is a great thing."

Kourtny Garrett with Downtown Dallas Inc. said more affordable residential is needed in the central business district. Average rents of new apartment projects in the downtown area are more than $1,500 a month.

"The workforce housing conversation is definitely a priority for us," Garrett said. "In terms of long-term sustainability for downtown you want that diversity. You want downtown to be for everyone."


Garrett said 20 percent of the employment downtown is blue-collar workers who need more housing options.

"We have learned lessons from a lot of other cities where the downtown housing prices have peaked," she said. "Your workforce can't afford to live close to where they work. It can deter corporate relocations."

Matthews is one of the most successful developers in the downtown area.

He built the 1,000-room Omni Dallas convention hotel, which opened in 2011. And Matthews is developing the South Side neighborhood on Lamar Street with apartments, condos, a hotel and redevelopment of the historic Sears Roebuck and Co. building.

Matthews bought the old Dallas High School property in 2015, which includes the old school and surrounding development land.

Matthews' 2400 Bryan Street LP is applying for 9 percent low income housing tax credits from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs to support the planned apartment project.

The building will have 10 floors of rental units on top of a 6-level parking garage.

"A sixth-floor amenity deck proposes a swimming pool, community room, dining area with warming kitchen, theatet and library, covered pavilion viewing deck and children's playscape," Matthews said in an email.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Dallas High School Restoration Adds Downtown Housing, as Knox-Henderson Apartment Proposal Regroups


Two Dallas developments recently in the news have evolved significantly since last year. Matthews Southwest is following its completion of the historic Dallas High School restoration by adding a mixed-income rental project on the same block, just as Alliance Residential Company has revealed a redesign of its planned Knox-Henderson multifamily complex.

Now that Dallas developer Jack Matthews of Matthews Southwest has wrapped up the renovation of the Dallas High School in the Arts District, it is asking the Texas Department of Housing a Community Affairs for a 9 percent Housing Tax Credit to help finance a 230 unit apartment project he wants to build next door.

Well, not quite next door. The site plan leaves space in the middle of the block for a future office building:


According to TDHCA records from the 2018 competitive tax credit cycle, the development name is 2400 Bryan. To qualify, a percentage of the units must be classified as affordable. Matthews’ application is splitting the units down the middle — 115 low income units and 115 market-rate units.

The developer is requesting the maximum credit of $1.5 million. Housing tax credit projects require the blessing of local politicians and neighbors; in this case, that would be the Downtown Dallas Neighborhood Association.

Matthews has reported the total project estimated cost at $70 million. That is for a 16-story building with a 400-vehicle parking garage and 10,000 square feet of ground level retail space. The site plan attached to a contract for the land purchase agreement — $7.5 million to seller Bryan Street Land Holdings LLC — shows the retail and residence lobby will face Bryan Street, and the garage entrance will be parallel to the U.S. Highway 75 access road.


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Dallas High School Restoration Adds Downtown Housing, as Knox-Henderson Apartment Proposal Regroups
JANUARY 26, 2018 BY ADOLFO PESQUERA LEAVE A COMMENT


An illustration of the Alliance Residential midrise at Cole Avenue in Knox-Henderson. Image: GFF / Alliance Residential.

Two Dallas developments recently in the news have evolved significantly since last year. Matthews Southwest is following its completion of the historic Dallas High School restoration by adding a mixed-income rental project on the same block, just as Alliance Residential Company has revealed a redesign of its planned Knox-Henderson multifamily complex.

Now that Dallas developer Jack Matthews of Matthews Southwest has wrapped up the renovation of the Dallas High School in the Arts District, it is asking the Texas Department of Housing a Community Affairs for a 9 percent Housing Tax Credit to help finance a 230 unit apartment project he wants to build next door.

Well, not quite next door. The site plan leaves space in the middle of the block for a future office building:


The site plan for a mixed-income residential tower at 2400 Bryan Street (highlighted in pink). Image: Matthews Southwest.

According to TDHCA records from the 2018 competitive tax credit cycle, the development name is 2400 Bryan. To qualify, a percentage of the units must be classified as affordable. Matthews’ application is splitting the units down the middle — 115 low income units and 115 market-rate units.

The developer is requesting the maximum credit of $1.5 million. Housing tax credit projects require the blessing of local politicians and neighbors; in this case, that would be the Downtown Dallas Neighborhood Association.

Matthews has reported the total project estimated cost at $70 million. That is for a 16-story building with a 400-vehicle parking garage and 10,000 square feet of ground level retail space. The site plan attached to a contract for the land purchase agreement — $7.5 million to seller Bryan Street Land Holdings LLC — shows the retail and residence lobby will face Bryan Street, and the garage entrance will be parallel to the U.S. Highway 75 access road.


The surface parking lot in the 2400 block of Bryan Street (right) is slated for a high-rise residential development. Residents would be across the street for DART’s Art District light rail station. Image: Google Maps.

Matthews told the Dallas Morning News he wanted to bring workforce housing downtown, an admirable goal considering the land values make this very hard to do. The building will have six levels of parking, ten floors of rental units, and an amenity deck above the sixth floor with a swimming pool, covered pavilion with viewing deck and children’s playground, a community room, dining area, theater and library.

The developer estimates the project will break ground in early 2019. The review process for a competitive housing tax credit usually winds up in late summer, so Matthews will know by August if the “affordable” part of his housing project is a go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Razor-Sharp Residential Project Headed to Dallas Arts District


A new mixed-use residential project by developer Matthews Southwest in the Dallas Arts District is planned under the obvious name of 2400 Bryan Street, but after reviewing the building’s sharp angles, a more appropriate moniker might be something like “The Razor.”

This razor’s edge points to where Bryan Street and the U.S. Highway 75 frontage road meet. Looking at the elevation perspective by architects Perkins+Will toward the southwest, the tower is so narrow it cuts like a knife. The architecture firm submitted its concept to the city’s Urban Design Peer Review office, thus affording Towers a more in-depth look at the concept we originally covered back in January.

Summarizing what’s been revealed to date, Matthews Southwest and Merriman Anderson Architects renovated the historic Dallas High School building in the 2400 block of Bryan Street. The development team then turned their attention to the rest of the site — currently comprised of vacant land and surface parking — and marked off a triangle on the northern tip of the block for this mixed-use residential building.

The design has two elevations and steps up so drastically, it looks like two separate buildings. Where it faces Bryan Street, Perkins+Will’s drawings show a seven-story building with retail and tenant amenity space on the ground floor, along with a community deck above the seventh floor. Where it faces the highway frontage, the building rises to 15 stories. The two elevations jump from a 70-foot height to 160 feet.

Most of the seven-level structure is parking and it will accommodate about 400 vehicles. The gross areas total 244,774 square feet for the residential tower and retail spaces, and 147,958 square feet for the garage.


There are 230 apartment units planned, half of them reserved for low-income tenants. Matthews Southwest submitted an application for the project to the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, seeking a 9 percent Housing Tax Credit.

Between the mixed-use building and the renovated Dallas High School, now home to Perkins+Will, the site plan has designated a future office tower and an internal street that will run between that tower and the current mixed-use project.

Perkins+Will gave the UDPR a summary of its design concept that explains how the two buildings will be integrated to each other and the neighborhood, keeping in mind that there is a DART light rail station on Bryan Street right in front of their project. The project’s objectives prioritize the continuation of the already active pedestrian realm in the surrounding area, with active ground uses along the western side of the project where it will face the future office tower.
 
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