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I think it was CWilson or one of the other Indy posters who was remarking a few months ago that they didn't realize that Dayton had hills.

Here is a thread on a neighborhood that climbs the hills south and east of the old part of the city: Walnut Hills. A good illustration of hilly Dayton.

The thread will first take a walk up Wayne Avenue, a main route out of the city to the south suburbs, and also the first transit route up into the hills via a horse car line. Then a visit to the old Asylum at the head of Wayne.

Then, into the neighborhood proper, streetscapes and illustrations of Hilly Walnut Hills, plus some local vernacular architecture peculiarities.

Finally, a walk Wyoming Avenue, the northern boundary of the neighborhood and one of Daytons inner-city busy streets.

If you are interested:

History of Walnut Hills part I

A history of the Development of the Neighborhood

Wayne Avenue

Originally the Waynesville Road, one of the early pioneer routes, it lead out from Dayton on the southeastery tangent, up a hollow or valley in the hills. The land around was purchased by an early settler of Dayton, a Mr. Edgar, whos son was one of the founders of the "hydraulic company" that provided water power to Dayton's early factorys. Edgar was also a quarryman, discovering a limestone outcropping on his land...the stones from his quarry went to make the Old Courthouse downtown.

Later, in the 1870s a horsecar line was built up Wayne to the Insane Asylum, which lead to Wayne being the first axis of "suburban" growth into Walnut Hills, as the Edgar heirs and sucessors subdivided the property.

As this was the Edgar farm, here is the original farmhouse with a victorian edition..the Edgar House



The current owners are restoring it and have a website and blog on the progress, which is a ton of fun to follow!....worth looking at if you ever want to restore an old house...

Welcome to Our Nightmare

This Old Crack House

(I have to say I really repsect and admire the work these folks have done with that old house).

More Wayne Avenue houses







This beautiful Victorian home was built by Samuel Edgar in the 1860’s for his daughter, Marianna. Gertrude Moore and her children moved to Dayton in 1914 following the death of her husband, a cabinet and coffin maker. The first woman to graduate from embalming school, Gertrude and her second husband, Fred Schlientz, opened Schlientz & Moore Funeral Home in 1921 at 2600 Wayne Avenue, relocating to the former Edgar home in 1936. It is still operated by the founders’ descendants.



This elegant homestead was built in 1866 by Samuel Edgar as a wedding present for his daughter, Margaret. In 1922, it became the first funeral home in Dayton. Before the 1920’s, undertakers operated out of storefronts and wakes were held in the homes of the deceased. Ben Westbrock, following a new national trend, transformed the old home into a full-service funeral facility. Westbrock began as an assistant to undertaker Peter Meyers before opening his own business in 1892. Today, the business is operated by the third and fourth generations of the Westbrock family. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.


Eshter Price Candies grew from a fudge recipe learned in Home Economics at Schiller School (later Lincoln School) to one of Dayton’s most cherished businesses. Esther Rose Rohman, born in 1904, first began making fudge as a girl in her home at Dover and Wyoming Streets. After her marriage to Ralph Price in 1924 and the birth of twins in 1926, Esther supplemented the family income by selling her candy to downtown businesses and department stores from their house on Fauver Avenue. The superior quality of her candy was immediately recognized and her home business grew rapidly. In 1952, she moved her business to the present location on Wayne Avenue. In 1976, James Day and Ralph Schmidt bought the business and continue Esther Price’s tradition of excellence.

(interior shot)


Looking north on Wayne, down into the valley, deeper into the city. The spire of the Lutheran church in the Oregon district terminates this vista down Wayne.



Looking south on Wayne up the hill



downtown


up Wayne again



Old fire station





Wayne Avenue houses





"Stately Wayne Manor"



Wayne Avenue buisnesses. This and Wyoming where sort of the buisness streets of the neighborhood.





Tank's. This was voted the "best tavern in Dayton" (or something like that in one of those newspaper polls)



Getting near the head of Wayne at the top of the hill....



At the head of Wayne the road forks, with Wilmington Pike heading to the right into the suburbs and Wayne and Waterveliet heading to the left to the Belmont neighborhood. The pergolas and gateway was the original entrance to the State Insane Asylum





View from the Pergola, down Wayne toward downtown



The asylum has been restored and is now an old folks home..it's pretty big.











Across from the Asylum is Walnut Hills park



..with views over Dayton and the Miami Valley





Hilly Walnut Hills

Exploring how the city works its way up the hills. Architecturally this neighborhood is sort of transitional between 19th century urban vernacular building and the bungalow/foursquare era of the 00's and 'teens.













houses further up the hills, behind these houses...







Hilly alleys and angled streets....



Slopey streets...


















....and the somewhat subtle nature of the hilly neighborhoods of Dayton..one knows one is climbing up these slopey streets and benches, but when your on top, one can catch glimpeses of the broad valley and the blue distance as the land fattens out into the plains of Ohio



Walnut Hills Backstreets

Just a few vignettes of the backstreets of Walnut Hills. The streets here sometimes run at odd angles ..and just some good generic Dayton working class neighborhood vibes here, too....









...the yellow house belongs to Drexel Dave


















Sooo Daytonesque....





COLORADO AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH, 101 Heaton Avenue. In 1903, the Baptist Union purchased a lot in Walnut Hills. Three years later, when the Third Street Baptist Church moved to a new building, the old edifice was dismantled and moved to this empty lot at Colorado and Heaton Avenues. The building was used for a Sunday school mission of the Linden Avenue Baptist Church until 1913 when the congregation organized as the Colorado Avenue Baptist Church. The present building was erected in 1916.







Doubles are worked in between single family houses







Impressive multifamily





Porches of Walnut Hills

...a local neighborhood vernacular.....











Walnut Hills Corner Tower Houses

....another neighborhood vernacular.....













Wyoming Avenue

The northern boundary of the neighborhood. South of here was developed in the 1870s and 1880s. Walnut Hills was platted by 1895. This street has a few small buisness clusters, and was one of the transit routes through the area as the Dayton-Xenia Interurban came through here in the 1890s, running a "city car" streetcar service out down Wymoning, up through neighboring Ohmer Park, and into Belmont.

Wyoming is today one of Daytons inner city busy streets....also a place to pick up on the hilly aspect of Dayton....and.....as this about Walnut Hills most of these pix will be of the south side of Wyoming....











Skateboard shop for the skate-punks







Chef Leos Chinese Restaurant in this neat mixed use building...



Neighborhood buisness cluster...





http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/Jeff59c/Walnut%20Hills/Wyoming12.jpg[/IMG

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/Jeff59c/Walnut%20Hills/Wyoming13.jpg

Nice bungalow....



Wyoming dropping down into the valley...Wyoming starts out on a sort of bench and drops down into the valley.....













Old neighborhood movie theatre:


I like this corner building....



...and a few 19th century vernacular houses..shotguns and urban I houses, as one approaches the Wayne and Wyoming intersection





A final look east up Wyoming



So, a generic Dayton neighborhood of the turn of the last century...

The folks who are restoring the Edgar House also hose this neat neighborhood website for the local communit group. You can see whats happening by following this link to the Walnut Hill Online
 

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by the way, do you have any pictures of dayton view and the neighborhood surrounding union theological? i recall some fabulous houses in those areas of dayton.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the way, do you have any pictures of dayton view and the neighborhood surrounding union theological? i recall some fabulous houses in those areas of dayton.
That would be the Dayton View Triangle.

That and adjacent neighborhoods has some of the best housing stock in Dayton. True mansions in some cases. The area is also "on the hills" to some extent, though maybe more near the top. The Salem Avenue corridor, of which this is a part, used to be Dayton's upscale Jewish "ghetto" as restricted convenants prevented Jews from buying into upscale/middle class 1920s-era Oakwood and Kettering, which was "restricted" to whites and gentiles.

I dont have any pix of the Dayton View Triangle area, though. I was planning on shooting that neighborhood (& a few others) later this year in late fall, when the leaves are off the trees mostly. It is one of the more wooded neighborhoods in the city

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If one is to visit Dayton I really wouldn't recommend this Walnut Hills area to visit. The old neighborhoods to see are Wright-Dunbar, as a modern example of the transformation of abandonment and urban prairie into a neotraditional neighborhood mixing old and new housing.

And the Oregon District, for a mix of the 19th century commercial street turned into nightlife district, plus one of the oldest intact inner city neighborhoods in Ohio, with housing dating from the 1830s to 1860s and a few later, all restored.
 

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Jeff_in_Dayton said:
That would be the Dayton View Triangle.

That and adjacent neighborhoods has some of the best housing stock in Dayton. True mansions in some cases. The area is also "on the hills" to some extent, though maybe more near the top. The Salem Avenue corridor, of which this is a part, used to be Dayton's upscale Jewish "ghetto" as restricted convenants prevented Jews from buying into upscale/middle class 1920s-era Oakwood and Kettering, which was "restricted" to whites and gentiles.

I dont have any pix of the Dayton View Triangle area, though. I was planning on shooting that neighborhood (& a few others) later this year in late fall, when the leaves are off the trees mostly. It is one of the more wooded neighborhoods in the city

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

If one is to visit Dayton I really wouldn't recommend this Walnut Hills area to visit. The old neighborhoods to see are Wright-Dunbar, as a modern example of the transformation of abandonment and urban prairie into a neotraditional neighborhood mixing old and new housing.

And the Oregon District, for a mix of the 19th century commercial street turned into nightlife district, plus one of the oldest intact inner city neighborhoods in Ohio, with housing dating from the 1830s to 1860s and a few later, all restored.

Thanks, Jeff. You are a very informative poster. Could I come get a Dayton tour sometime?
 
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