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New Urbanist
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5,526 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This drought problem will start to hurt our population growth if we don't do anything.

This picture is of a LV house made from recycled salt from a desal plant...

energy efficient!

This proposed desal plant is practically environmentally friendly! WHY ARE QUEENSLANDERS SO STUPID!!! We still rely on rain!!!

Proposed second Perth Seawater Desalination Plant... this thing will also recycle its own energy!

With increasing growth in Perth and surrounding regions, demand for water continues to grow. Couple this with our drying climate, the Water Corporation estimates that a new source will be needed by November 2009. The extraction of water from the South West Yarragadee aquifer is the preferred option for this water source, and approval for this project is expected in late 2006.

Should the Water Corporation not receive approval on the South West Yarragadee aquifer, it is proposing to seek environmental approval for a second desalination plant south of Perth.

The major risk the Water Corporation faces by not maintaining its water source development is having inadequate security of supply and a significantly elevated risk of full sprinkler bans.

The Water Corporation is investigating a number of sites for the plant including two in the East Rockingham area, and the preferred option at Port Kennedy.

Possible intake and outfall locations include Cockburn Sound, the Sepia Depression Ocean Outfall Line, Becher Point and Comet Bay/Secret Harbour.

If the proposed second plant goes ahead, it will deliver 45GL of water per year from the end of 2009. This will make it a major contributing water source feeding into the Integrated Water Supply Scheme, which provides water to 1.5m Western Australians.
 

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Should have been built years ago, it's not even expensive nowdays.

Water management here is a joke, the whole crisis now is the result of the mistakes of the past, and you still got NIMBY's against damns and desal.

Well let's see, they don't want damns, they don't want desal, they don't want anything! Let's see how long they can live without water!
 

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I hope the gold coast desal plant goes in, Isn't brisbane water connected to logan and the gold coast? We have the technology, it's tested and proven to work, lets use it!!
 

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It's not election time yet, thats why nothings been set in stone. :bash:
 

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hehe, I suppose the big guns will make all the plans and promises when it's time to win votes again ;)
 

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Yeah but No!!
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I agree, I think it is inevitable that we will have to put desal plants in for Brisbane. Added to this though, attitudes still need to be changed, I think there are still so many people out there who dont quite get how desperate the situation is getting. Im all for the two new dams that are planned, but I just hope that there is enough rain to fill them.

I would love to see more home based technology made available at cheaper prices too. I know alot of people have buckets in their showers to catch the water that is wasted while the water heats up, but imagine if you could flick a switch that would change the waste pipe to send this water to a holding tank for flushing the loo or watering the yard. This is something that I have been thinking about for a while and it may seem like a difficult idea but imagine if it was that easy, surely more people would do their part. All Im saying is that thinking outside the square and making it readily and affordably available could save this country alot of water. I also wonder if it was petrol, whether more would have been done years ago.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand, Any ideas as to where they would put a desalinisation plant?
 

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QUEENSLANDER!!!
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2,560 Posts
we should recycle, capture rainwater, drill, build more dams, desal and redirect stormwater into holding tanks.

i have an idea where when creeks flood during heavy rain, there are open gates that capture the water and store it underground. the gates would be located beside the creek obviously. One particular area is the Kedron Brook. It would have smaller env. impacts as the creek has no vegetation
 

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Its a sleepy little town
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3,883 Posts
If every house had rainwater tanks for garden stuff etc, and toilets then we wouldnt have a water problem.

We had a 6000 litre tank put in the other day... its for the toilets and garden as i said.
I suspect it will greatly save water.
 

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Yeah but No!!
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Thats awesome Malt!!! Ive been meaning to install a tank for ages, just cant work out where the best place to put it is.

Do you know what the cost was, installation cost, rebate?
 

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QUEENSLANDER!!!
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The cost is the big thing malt. Why install if u get no financial benefit for years. I know the obvious answer is because we have no water and only when we have nothing left will ppl think about paying for it
 

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Captain Awesome
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738 Posts
Brisbane City Council has a $750 rebate for tanks over 3000 litres. Desalinisation is not sustainable and not a good idea. Have a glass of water and it only used as much energy to produce as a Toyota Prado!
 

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New Urbanist
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
^^ Again, ABS you know that there are some desal plants all over the world that recycle their own energy...like the one in Perth...so maybe you should get that myth out of yr head...

Or better yet, Lets just go onto level 7 water restrictions...where we have to take 1 minute showers only...that is quite sad for a capital city to become like that...Rain tanks are not the answer, people live in units and don't have space...i certainly don't..
 

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Former Member
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GMAC said:
I know alot of people have buckets in their showers to catch the water that is wasted while the water heats up
Wtf? You're supposed to turn the hot tap on first and then COOL the water down! You'll waste far less water by turning on the hot tap first. Try it.

Just had to say that!
Trent.
 

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Maybe the price of water should be like the price of other things and vary according to supply and demand. When supply is short as it is during dry spells its' price should go up to reflect its' scarcity so as to give people an incentive to reduce their consumption and conserve this precious resource. Price changes should match the frequency of receipt of water bills e.g. monthly bills, monthly change; quarterly bills, quarterly change etc, with the price for the coming period clearly stated on the bill and advertised prominently in the media (both before and after the change), especially in news bulletins.

When water meters were connected to properties in Newcastle, NSW, water consumption decreased to the extent that the need for a new dam was put back by several decades. A few years ago, when I was on a bus tour around Canberra, the driver said that before meters were installed there her next door neighbour used to have his sprinkler going every day, but after they were installed he stopped that practice quick smart!

Perhaps underground irrigation systems could be used for parks, sports grounds and golf courses etc, as these reduce evaporative loss to near zero.

If they exist alternative sources e.g. aquifers should be tapped to provide extra supply during droughts, and when rainfall results in dam levels rising these can be shut off again till the next dry spell.

New supply infrastructure, whilst needed, is a long-term proposition usually requiring years of planning, environmental studies, consultation and so on as well as ultimately construction before they can come on stream.

On a short-term basis, to regulate demand, the price of water should reflect available supply which depends on the vagaries of the weather, otherwise rationiong by way of water restrictions is the only answer.
 

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New Urbanist
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
^^ I agree with you that the price of water is way too cheap. But, aquifers aren't going to supply enough water for the overall Greater Brisbane area. We need to have a bigger supply of water in order to cater for the 1500 people moving to SEQ each week. The city of Perth is about to have its 2nd desalination plant, and its 1st was a huge success.

We just need a bigger quantity of water to handle the extra showers, extra dishwashers, extra toilets etc... Watch 7 news tonight because they have a special about how suncorp stadium saves allot of water and how or if we should just let our sporting grounds go to dust...would be interesting to watch.. :)
 

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I think education is the key. If the community are educated about saving water, we can all do our bit. It's all about awareness. We got a 3000 litre water tank last xmas, and it filled up over the summer.

My father works in a power station, and he advised me that the power station was told to stop pumping water out of the dams. They need this water for their cooling systems, so without it - no electricity. Low supplies of water have indirect effects on everything, we are looking at getting solar hot water next.

As for the Desal plant, I think that if we follow best practice, their shouldn't be too many problems.
 

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Captain Awesome
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738 Posts
Telling people that they are stupid and outdated won't solve anything SoulvisionQ1.
 

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New Urbanist
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
^^ I said politicians are stupid! and yes they are, I think everyone knows that...as for outdated, yes there are some people who actually still believe that it wastes energy, and they are sadly mistaken!
 

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...........
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Combine a desal plant with the solar power that the CSIRO have got working and are still working on...you are then in the fresh water and salt market!!!

If you can find an enviro friendly power source, Desal and recycling is the best way to go. Dams are amazingly damaging to the environment, and it completely changes the economics of areas. Also, you need to put dams in areas with a high rainfall, which then means less good farming land in Australia.
 
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