SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The City of Sunderland needs a stronger identity and one way of doing that would be to have all areas within the city have an SR post code.

This would mean that
DH4 and DH5 post codes for Houghton le Spring & Hetton-le-Hole
and
NE37 and NE38 post codes for Washington revert to SR post codes

Also it would help if all telephone numbers began with 0191 5 instead of some begining with 0191 3 and 0191 4

As for area's that should be within the city boundarys I think Seaham, Murton and Cleadon would be good sensible additions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
Interesting point, i guess places like Seaham, which are quiet heavily influenced by Sunderland, which provides the major destination for shopping, and a lot of jobs for people in Seaham would come under a Sunderland LUZ (Larger Urban Zone), but i don't think the EU did an LUZ for Sunderland when the calculated it a few years ago.

With regards to Tyneside, i pretty much agree with the Newcastle people on that, as Gateshead, and places like Wallsend are firmly in Newcastle's orbit, and give that city a boost in terms of its economic and geographic reach, which it would not have if it stood alone within its current boundaries. It is for that reason, that i can't see Gateshead's bid for city status succeeding...sorry Gateshead.
Regarding Gateshead and the possibility of City status, --I think they might struggle to gain City status, --but I wish them luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
I agree, simple things such as post codes, and dial codes would reinforce the city's sphere of influence, also if the proposed metro lines ended up branching out to Washington and Seaham too, it would make the Sunderland metro area a lot stronger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
I agree, simple things such as post codes, and dial codes would reinforce the city's sphere of influence, also if the proposed metro lines ended up branching out to Washington and Seaham too, it would make the Sunderland metro area a lot stronger.
Yes your right, ---and btw, --there's talk of the Metro possibly branching to those areas you mentioned along with Doxford park, --of course this could be about ten years from now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,728 Posts
Boundary plans would put Angel of the North in Sunderland Parliamentary Constituency
by Adrian Pearson, The Journal, November 15th 2011


THE full absurdities of Boundary Commission plans have been revealed amid claims the Angel of the North would be counted as part of a Sunderland parliamentary constituency under proposed changes.

A Conservative party bid to reduce the number of MPs from 650 down to 600 will see three North East seats go and many more redrawn under proposals discussed in Newcastle.

MPs and concerned individuals lined up to show Boundary Commission officials that plans created in London have little or no consideration for the geographical realities of where people live, shop and work in the North East.

Labour’s Blaydon MP Dave Anderson, whose constituency would be abolished under current proposals, told the Commission during a public inquiry at Newcastle’s Civic Centre that the changes ignored all that places such as Gateshead had proudly achieved.

In Newcastle City Centre former local MP Nick Brown presented a submission for Labour MPs, still to be formerly recommended by the party nationally, which keeps to the five Tyneside seats proposed by the commission but tweaks the wards included in each. This would see the North Tyneside seat saved and prevent the commission creating a new Whitley Bay seat.

Speaking for the Liberal Democrats, former Newcastle Council leader Lord Shipley proposed scrapping the Newcastle Central seat and dividing the wards up between three Newcastle seats, with the Town Moor acting as a natural boundary.


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-...h-in-sunderland-61634-29777200/#ixzz1dlR4PBKI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
^^^^

The one thing I agree with is,--the reduction of MPs, ----but some of these proposed boundary changes will upset quite a number of people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
The problem is, is that the MPs need to be reflective of the communities they serve, and this is something I reckon the boundary commission are struggling with. From a political perspective, Gateshead and Sunderland are pretty similar, but a parliamentary constituency straddling the 2 communities is a bit more problematic, as you've got half the constituency in Gateshead MBC and half in Sunderland City Council's area, and a lot of the time they'll have different needs and demands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
The problem is, is that the MPs need to be reflective of the communities they serve, and this is something I reckon the boundary commission are struggling with. From a political perspective, Gateshead and Sunderland are pretty similar, but a parliamentary constituency straddling the 2 communities is a bit more problematic, as you've got half the constituency in Gateshead MBC and half in Sunderland City Council's area, and a lot of the time they'll have different needs and demands.

Yeah I agree, ---while I can understand the need to reduce the amount of MPs, -I think it might to be a struggle for the Commission to convince some people that their areas will be changed, ---it's wait and see, --but some people are going to be disappointed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
It was developing into an interesting debate but appears to have stalled, with the actual issue being sidetracked with other concerns. I decided to leave it alone as it only seemed a matter of time before it became yet another tiresomely misinformed and one-sided Newcastle v Sunderland argument.

In terms of boundaries, I think it is fairly well accepted that they are a bit of a mess at present. They are illogical, certainly - drawn with political and economic, rather than community and historic, considerations in mind.

I remember arguing this particular point some time ago (not sure if it was on this site or elsewhere), but the first thing that should be done is to bring all northern Wearside areas south of the accent divide into the City of Sunderland. That means bringing in the southernmost three quarters of the Whitburn and Marsden ward from South Tyneside, along with all of the Cleadon and East Boldon ward, and the South Boldon/Dipe Lane areas from the Boldon Colliery ward, again from South Tyneside.

To the south I would like to see Seaham, Seaton, Murton, South Hetton, Hawthorn, the Easingtons and all surrounding villages certainly as far as the A1086, brought into the City of Sunderland. All these places have very strong ties to Sunderland, however they are currently administered from the more alien Durham City. They are very similar in nature to the existing coalfield areas around Penshaw, Shiney Row, Houghton and Hetton, and would complement and fit in well.

With respect to the new towns of Washington and Peterlee, I'm somewhat torn as to what these towns' fate should be. By their nature as new towns, loyalties are divided between Tyne/Wear and Wear/Tees respectively, so carving them up is more difficult. In areas like Fatfield, Teal Farm, Rickleton, Harraton, Sulgrave, Horden and others, there is a definite attachment to Wearside, but in some other areas of both new towns there seems to a majority of non-Wear types.

A 'Sunderland and East Durham' local authority would be my absolute minimum expectation, comprising the areas listed above. It's an interesting, and open ended, subject.
Washington has longstanding links to Sunderland (e.g. the Washington family coat of arms is on Hylton Castle and coal from Washington was shipped along the River Wear to Sunderland).

My family is from Washington and I have no problems fact it is now in Sunderland. Cities and towns grow and envelop other outlying areas, that's just the way it is. If the mags there don't like it then that's their tough luck.

Washington is not, never has been and never will be Tyneside, and should have nowt to do with such a conurbation in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
^^^^

I can remember when Newcastle was in Northumberland County, --and Sunderland was in County Durham, ---also if I remember correctly, ---Towns and areas south of the Tyne were all in County Durham, ---it all changed in the early 70s, ---no doubt they will try to change things in the future, --it's the way it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
^^^^

I can remember when Newcastle was in Northumberland County, --and Sunderland was in County Durham, ---also if I remember correctly, ---Towns and areas south of the Tyne were all in County Durham, ---it all changed in the early 70s, ---no doubt they will try to change things in the future, --it's the way it is.
The River Tyne was the boundary between County Durham and Northumberland until 1974, when the new Tyne and Wear County Council was formed (ran until 1986).

Washington, Houghton, Hetton et al became part of what was then the Metropolitan Borough of Sunderland in that year.

Incidentally, Gosforth, where I grew up, only became part of Newcastle in the same year. Previous to that it had been a wholly separate Urban District of the county of Northumberland. That's why the old dog track (where Asda is) was the Northumberland County dog track, the cricket club on the High Street (still there) South Northumberland Cricket Club and the boozer -also on the High Street - called 'The County.'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
The River Tyne was the boundary between County Durham and Northumberland until 1974, when the new Tyne and Wear County Council was formed (ran until 1986).

Washington, Houghton, Hetton et al became part of what was then the Metropolitan Borough of Sunderland in that year.

Incidentally, Gosforth, where I grew up, only became part of Newcastle in the same year. Previous to that it had been a wholly separate Urban District of the county of Northumberland. That's why the old dog track (where Asda is) was the Northumberland County dog track, the cricket club on the High Street (still there) South Northumberland Cricket Club and the boozer -also on the High Street - called 'The County.'
Aye all these changes over the years, --people don't like changes, --but there will probably bemore in the future.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,507 Posts
Welcome to Sundercastle or would you prefer Newderland? - Top banker suggests merging North cities

From today's Chronicle Live - copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/jim-oneill-suggests-merging-newcastle-6762056

Welcome to Sundercastle or would you prefer Newderland? - Top banker suggests merging North cities
By Adrian Pearson - 2nd March 2014



Welcome to Sundercastle...or would you prefer Newderland?

It might enrage both the black-and-white and the red-and-white sections of the North East, but one of the world’s most influential economists has said it is time for cities such as Sunderland and Newcastle to consider merging.

The prospect of a 'Sundercastle' being forced onto Tyne and Wear was raised after former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O’Neill - who is drawing up a report for the Government on the future of the UK economy - said it was time for bigger and better cities.

The former top banker raised eyebrows when he suggested the likes of Manchester and Liverpool should at least look at merging to become a new “Manpool” metro region.

And he didn’t stop there, saying that the same logic could be applied to Newcastle and Sunderland.

Mr O’Neill is finalising a report with the City Growth Commission set to be put to Government later this year. And Mr O’Neill, who once headed up an $800bn investment pot, says the only way to grow is to get bigger.

He told the Sunday Sun: “Newcastle and Sunderland are showing how two cities within the same region can work more closely as they develop a single Combined Authority. The question is then how the two cities can develop their economies faster by sharing the benefits of a larger labour and consumer market.

“The City Growth Commission plans to listen to key political and business leaders in the North East in the summer in our third evidence hearing, following Manchester in February and Bristol in April.”

The prospect of Government ministers being advised to create a Sundercastle, or even a Newderland, has not gone down well in the region.

Newcastle Central MP Chi Onwurah said that clearly the region had to work together to offset the impact of London, but there were obvious limits.

She said: “I’m hugely supportive of efforts to strengthen our regional economy and to work together but we have to do this while maintaining our strong local identity. The great thing about being a Newcastle MP is knowing that I come from a city that is of its identity without looking down on others.”

That skeptical view was matched by Newcastle Council leader Nick Forbes.

He said: “I’m all in favour of cities working together and we are doing that in the North East by creating a Combined Authority to accelerate growth.

“But the idea of merging the two is just ba-rmy. Newcastle and Sunderland have different and distinctive identities.”

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/jim-oneill-suggests-merging-newcastle-6762056
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,977 Posts
^^^^
I think this has been talked about in parts of the Country some years ago, ---and while I think that the local authorities should get together as they are doing for the North East, --I can't see this idea of Cities merging happening.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,507 Posts
Newcastle, Northumberland and North Tyneside set to split off from rest of North East

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news...le-northumberland-north-tyneside-set-13836646
Newcastle, Northumberland and North Tyneside set to split off from rest of North East
Jonathan Walker 31 October 2017


Peter Jackson, Nick Forbes and Norma Redfearn

Newcastle, Northumbria and North Tyneside are set to split off from the rest of the North East with their own regional authority and mayor. It will mean breaking up the North East Combined Authority , created in 2014.

ChronicleLive understands Peter Jackson, leader of Northumberland County Council , Nick Forbes, leader of Newcastle City Council, and Norma Redfearn, mayor of North Tyneside, were in London on Tuesday for talks with Communities Minister Jake Berry, who is responsible for the Government’s Northern Powerhouse policy. There is agreement on the need to create a new Combined Authority to represent the three councils, which will be chaired by a directly-elected regional mayor and have its own devolution “deal”, likely to mean an annual payment from Government over a period of around 30 years. A final agreement will need to be signed off by Mr Berry’s boss, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid.

But it will raise questions about the relationship between the new authority and the North East Combined Authority, which includes Sunderland, Gateshead, South Tyneside and Durham councils, as well as the three authorities planning to break away. For example, the North East Combined Authority currently oversees transport body Nexus, which operates the Tyne and Wear Metro. But the new authority is likely to want to have a say in how Nexus is run.

Funding for the North of the Tyne deal is likely to be less than £900 million but it is not known what the figure will be. The Government argues that creating directly-elected regional mayors is an essential part of its plans to devolve power and funding to regions, because they can be held accountable by local voters.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news...le-northumberland-north-tyneside-set-13836646
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Yeah, it's not as detrimental to South Tyneside as it is to Gateshead. Maybe South Tyneside could join up with Sunderland and Durham area and create their own body or just go it alone.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,507 Posts
Divided North East: What will happen to the south of Tyne when the north breaks away?

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/divided-north-east-what-happen-13952890
Divided North East: What will happen to the south of Tyne when the north breaks away?
Sean Seddon 26 November 2017


An aerial view of the River Tyne with Gateshead and Newcastle (Image: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire)

With the North of Tyne region pressing ahead with devolution, there are big questions surrounding what the authorities to the south of the river do next.

A faction emerged in the North East that did not trust the Government’s offer on devolution, arguing the insistence on an elected mayor was wasteful and unnecessary and that it didn’t come with “new” money. The nail in the coffin for a unified devolution deal was Gateshead’s rejection of the deal. The pro-devolution council leader Mick Henry resigned shortly after and was replaced by the anti-devolution councillor Martin Gannon.

Andrew Hodgson, chair of the North East Local Enterprise Partnership, said he hopes the south of Tyne authorities return to the negotiating table for the sake of attracting investors to the region. He said: “I’ve been clear right the way through, as have the business community, that we want to have as many of the authorities within the deal as possible. We want to do that in a way which does not compromise the deal - the most important thing was to get an agreement and now we can think about making it as geographically broad as possible. There would be technical complications to adding in authorities but I would love to see as many south of the Tyne councils engaging and working together as possible.”

Mr Gannon, leader of Gateshead Council, said: “I know that the Minister was saying that the offer was open. We are grateful for their generous offer and of course will examine the proposals in each individual case. The North East Combined Authority continues and at the moment it still contains North Tyneside, Newcastle and Northumberland. I will carry out the statutory duty which is our responsibility within the legislation, the North East Combined Authority has to review the current arrangements and we will carry out that role. I have had a very brief presentation about the offer to the North of Tyne authorities, that isn’t a detailed examination of those proposals. I’m not going to make decisions about the future governance of Gateshead or the wider region on the basis of that kind of evidence. What I need is to examine very carefully exactly what the proposals are.”

Aside from the North of Tyne deal, the southern authorities have some more immediate decisions to make. First, the North of Tyne deal needs to be approved by the North East Combined Authority, allowing the three northern areas to walk away and set up their new arrangement. Technically, the four southern authorities could block the process, although at this stage that seems unlikely. Second, the four of them will need to decide what to do with NECA - and what to call it- especially since its main function, transport, will become the domain of a new Joint Committee.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/divided-north-east-what-happen-13952890
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top