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Ahsan Manzil and Lalbagh Fort are looking great after recent repainting. I think govt should take initiative to paint or at least throughly clean select major monuments after each monsoon. This makes possible nice photos like the ones above, plus makes better impression on tourists visiting these sites...which in turn promotes tourism and better image for the country.

On another note, I think Sriti Shoudha would be greatly enhanced with a veneer of either white or black marble. At the time of its construction, the nation was so poor that this would not be rational, however as time goes by, such a proposal becomes more feasible. Of course those of us who have visited the place think it's great, but reading comments by non-Bangladeshi forumers in the "Rate Architecture" section, a lot of people were put off by the concrete, and on reflection, their reaction is understandable...the color / texture can come across as rough or cold. My preference would be a cladding of white marble...though black would also look good...either color would be appropriate for a monument of mourning or remembrance. Aside from looking good, such embellishment would enhance the dignity of the structure.

PS Tmac your most recent photos weren't up when I started writing this post...but I second your feeling on the aerial parliament photo...it is the clearest such shot that I have seen.
 

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Tetulia theke Teknaf
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I couldn't find any pictures of Fazlul Haq Hall, Jagannath Hall, Chameli House, or Salimullah Hall. These are landmark buildings too.
 

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I couldn't find any pictures of Fazlul Haq Hall, Jagannath Hall, Chameli House, or Salimullah Hall. These are landmark buildings too.
Pictures of those ones are not always easy to find, but both Tmac and I have posted them before. I posted some pics I collected on pages 18 and 19 of this thread...all the buildings you mentioned are there. Of course Tmac has posted multiple times...too many to keep track of.

It's great that so many pictures of Bangladesh's built and natural heritage are now available on the web...no doubt the widespread availability of digital photography has helped this. In the 1990s when I would search for photos the only ones I could find were limited, small, or outdated ones on sites like Virtual Bangladesh. (I certainly don't mean that a criticism of Virtual Bangladesh or any other site...in fact I admire them for being the early promoters of BD on the web.)
 

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^^ The Rail Station was built a long time ago at a time when our country was dirt poor and still under de-facto colonial rule as East Pakistan....I think it is actually a good example of how it is possible to build a nice work of architecture on a small budget. On a quiet night it actually looks quite beautiful and can be a pleasant place to walk around. That being said I would love to see it rebuilt using more modern materials...I hope they don't change the design though. I doubt we will see changes any time soon however...since Rail caters to a domestic and usually less affluent clientele.
 

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Louis I. Khan, pure genious :) . This is the first time I noticed how intricate the design is from above, its amazing how it works from both above and below.
Would have been even better had there been a dome, as originally intended. This would have given greater height to the central chamber. Although the central room is still great, some have noted how it seems a little anticlimactic compared to the soaring ambulatory around it. I have seen one of Kahn's sketches for the dome; it wasn't built because it was determined that the walls as built could not support the weight.
 

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Kahn went through a variety designs for Sher-e-Bangla Nagar. At various times these included a Supreme Court, a National Stadium, and other structures to be built within the area. Below is the plan as it stood at the time of his death in 1974. As you can see it is very similar to what exists today. The big omission is the huge Secretariat building (labeled "B"), which faces the Parliament across a meadow and serves as a counterpoint. The meadow is now the Zia Mazar area, but the land for the Secretariat remains vacant except for the conference center built at one corner. I have heard talk of the secretariat moving here from Motijheel...has anyone else heard anything? Although the Secretariat building was not as impressive a design as the parliament (appropriately so, perhaps), it was nonetheless an imposing structure and one that would be a great improvement over the ugly concrete block in Motijheel.

On another note, some day I shall find that sketch of the Parliament dome I referred to, and post it here.

 

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Here is a 3-D view of the layout in the previous post, showing more clearly the shape of proposed Secretariat. You will note also some differences / additional structures on what is now the lawn south of the Assembly building.

 

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Tetulia theke Teknaf
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^^ There had been changes at different stages -- we know Shaheed Zia's mazar was a later addition. Name of the "second capitol" was Ayub Nagar. Later it was changed to Sher-e-Bangla Nagar. Even before '71 we had started to call this place Sher-e-Bangla Nagar.

Omissions of the parliament dome and the secretariat were the biggest changes in terms of design implementation.

Here are some pictures from early stages of planning and construction. Maybe they were posted before. I couldn't find them in this thread.





 

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Here is an Old Dhaka building I was not familiar with. Ershad Ahmed posted these pics recently...his commentary follows:




Imambara (Husaini Dalan) located in Farashganj is known to be the oldest one of the Imambaras of Dhaka. It was built in 1600 ad by one Amir Khan. It’s a common practice among Shia community to build edifices to commemorate the martyrdom of al-Husain the grandson of Holy prophet of Islam Muhammad, at the battle of Karbala in Iraq on the 10th day of Muharram 61 AH (10 October 680 AD). Imambara literally means residence for the Imam stands for a house or an assembly hall built by the Shiites for observing Muharram. There is a tomb of Fatima bibi inside from which the name derives, but its creation is shrouded with mystery. However, a Parsi named SM Doshanji renovated the aging Imambara in 1861. In the year 1946 during communal riot, the Imambara was heavily damaged but the portion of ‘Nahbatkhana’ survived. The damaged portions were reconstructed later.

At one time there were 15 Imambaras in Dhaka alone, of which the most famous is the Husaini Dalan near Bakshibazar built by Syed Mir Murad 42 years after the Imambara of Bibi ka Rauja.
 
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