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I don't think Cambodians should allowed that at all. On the other hand, Cambodia should not go too far and stop Laos from building the dam. Something between has to be compromised. Both countries should make sure that the dam should not destroy the environment and the livelihood of many people living along the Mekong and other rivers.
 

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Oz-Asian
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Laos unveils strategy on Xayaboury dam

Laos will not undertake any construction of the Xayaboury dam in the mainstream Mekong River until it has addressed all concerns over the possible impacts of the country's largest hydropower plant.

“We plan to invite development partners and Mekong River Commission (MRC) member countries to visit the project site so they can see the actual development for themselves,” Deputy Minister of Energy and Mines Mr Viraphonh Viravong said in an exclusive interview with Vientiane Times yesterday.

“The Xayaboury project will develop one of the most transparent and modern dams in the world,” he added.

Mr Viraphonh said there are two major issues - fish migration and sediment flow – which neighbouring countries and environmentalists have expressed concern over and want the government to address before building the first dam in the lower Mekong basin.

He said the Lao government had hired two independent international consultants to review the project design, with the aim of convincing neighbouring countries that there is no cross-border environmental impact.

The independent consultants, Poyry and Companie Nationale du Rhone, have advised the government to modify the dam, which will be equipped with comprehensive fish passage facilities to ensure that 85 percent of fish can pass through the dam in accordance with MRC guidelines.

The consultants also advised that the dam must be equipped with a sediment flushing system, to ensure the flushing through of all sediments, which are an essential component of aquatic feed and fertiliser, Mr Viraphonh said. Once the government is convinced that it has addressed all the concerns of neighbouring countries and development partners, the project will revert to its normal construction schedule, he added.

He said the Lao government had kept its promise not to undertake construction in the mainstream river. However, he said geological sub-surface investigations were being carried out in the Mekong River.

“The project developer is drilling rocks in the Mekong River for study,” he said, adding that the work is part of the hydropower plant detail re-designing process. The geological investigations should not harm the river in any way, nor pose any threat to people who live along the Mekong downstream, so Mekong member countries and environmentalist groups should not worry about the project development impact.

Mr Viraphonh said the developer has built roads and other facilities near the planned dam site, adding that these are on land and should not have any negative impact on the Mekong downstream.

He said people who lived in the area were happy that roads were being built and they could benefit from improved public infrastructure.

He re-iterated the fact that, although the government has completed the Prior Consultation process in accordance with the 1995 MRC requirements, it has not started any construction work in the mainstream river.



By Times Reporters
(Latest Update July 06, 2012)

http://www.vientianetimes.org.la/FreeContent/FreeConten_Laos_unveils.htm
 

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Oz-Asian
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Laos to boost hydro-electricity output by a quarter



Deutsche Presse-Agentur July 5, 2012 7:27 pm

Vientiane (dpa) - Laos plans to boost electricity output by 26 per cent next year, state media reported Thursday.





According to the Ministry of Planning, the completion of four new dams by the end of 2012 should boost the country’s electricity output by 664 megawatts, the Vientiane Times reported.

Laos currently has 17 operational hydropower plants with a power production capacity of about 2,560 megawatts.

The land-locked country exports an estimated 64 per cent of its electricity to neighbouring Thailand, but imports electricity from Thailand, China and Vietnam to meet its domestic needs.

The government says it hopes to end electricity imports by 2015.

About 78 per cent of households in Laos have access to electricity.

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/bus...-electricity-output-by-a-quarte-30185600.html
says here laos has got heaps of dams why do they need one right on the mekong???
 

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Oz-Asian
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Laos confirms Mekong dam suspension
Posted 13 July 2012, 23:58 AEST


Laos has confirmed that work has been suspended on a controversial $3.5 billion hydropower dam on the Mekong River after requests from neighbouring countries and environmental groups, the first time the government has publicly declared the project halted.
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Nine dams planned for the Mekong River in Laos could change life for locals. (Credit: ABC)
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"The Lao government decided to postpone it. We have to do further studies," Foreign Minister Thongloun Sisoulith told reporters on the sidelines of a regional meeting in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh.

Thongloun Sisoulith said a seminar on the matter would be held on Saturday in Luang Prabang in Laos and that concerned parties would be able to visit the site of the dam.

Vietnam, which has opposed the project, welcomed the news, saying the dam was one of the biggest concerns for countries along the Mekong River.

Laos had agreed to suspend the project last December, pending further studies led by Japan, after protests that the 1,260 megawatt dam would harm migratory fish and the livelihood of fishermen and communities along the river.

However, campaigners have said Thai construction company Ch Karnchang Pcl, the main developer, was going ahead with work on the ground, a claim the government denied in local media last week.

Japan said this week it had seen no request from the countries concerned for funds for an environmental impact assessment.

"If the Commissioner of the Mekong River is going to produce a plan to conduct the scientific environmental survey, I think Japan has already made it clear that it is ready to positively consider assistance," said Naoko Saiki, a deputy press secretary at Japan's Foreign Affairs Ministry.

The project, which would bring the first dam across the lower Mekong, is being led by Thai builders, power firms and banks. Thailand would take about 95 percent of the electricity generated.

Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia share the lower stretches of the 4,900 km (3,044 mile) Mekong.

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/international/2012-07-13/laos-confirms-mekong-dam-suspension/979886
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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says here laos has got heaps of dams why do they need one right on the mekong???
It say it in the article, it want to be self efficient in energy from hydro power.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Put yourself in their show, if you can build dam in Cambodia so you can be self sufficient, so that you can give your people cheaper power, so it means you can attract more foriegn investor here, would you do want to do it?
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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i was thinking if thai, khmer and viet pay laos a few millions each to stop the construction for good
You need to provide them with free energy to make up their shortfall.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Home Energy Reactor
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Better move this article to Lao section though ... After all, Laos need such a dam to generate more power to earn more hard currency as well as to power the proposed high speed project railway from Boten to Viengchan
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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^^ We can, but this is probably a mekong thread instead of a country specific thread.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Not sure if it is the same news.

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index....onal-news/yingluck-vows-to-halt-xayaburi.html

Yingluck vows to halt Xayaburi



The Thai company set to build Laos’s Xayaburi hydropower dam will not begin construction until a study determines the dam’s environmental effects on the Mekong River, Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said on Friday.

Yingluck reaffirmed her commitment to the study, which Mekong River Commission countries Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam agreed in December to undertake before construction could begin.

“We will study together the scope of the impact along the Mekong and we will see what the impact is,” Yingluck said after a meeting with Prime Minister Hun Sen in Siem Reap.

Vietnam and Cambodia have voiced concerns over the effects the dam could have on communities downstream, following recent reports Thai development firm Ch.Karnchang has stepped up construction.

Hun Sen said he had voiced such concerns with Yingluck, whose country will receive 95 per cent of the dam’s electricity.

“Her Excellency, Yingluck, has affirmed that the dam has not been built,” he said. “We were very happy with this information and hope this will benefit both the upper and lower Mekong countries.”

Despite reports in April that Ch.Karnchang had signed a construction deal dated in March, Laos claims that only preliminary work has begun on the 1,260 megawatt dam.

Te Navuth, secretary-general of the Cambodan National Mekong Committee, said yesterday Cambodia’s ambassador in Vientiane had been invited to inspect the Xayaburi site today and tomorrow.

“But I don’t know [if he will attend],” he said.

Navuth said Cambodia and Vietnam would continue drafting a letter to the Lao government asking it to halt work.

Laos Foreign Minister Thongloun Sisolouth said on Friday preliminary work was on hold.

“The Lao government decided to postpone it. We have to do further studies,” he said, according to Reuters.

Ame Trandem, Southeast Asia program director of International Rivers, said it was vital the trans-boundary impacts were explored.

“The company has never looked at the impact on Cambodia,” she said, adding the project seriously threatened Cambodian fish stocks.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Good news doesn't last long..

Xayaburi dam construction to proceed
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index....ews/xayaburi-dam-construction-to-proceed.html


The Laos government will continue to allow what it has dubbed “preparatory work” on the controversial Xayaburi dam, including the resettlement of villagers, despite promising to suspend the project at last week’s ASEAN Regional Forum, according to a media report in Laos.

Laos Deputy Minister of Energy and Mines Viraphonh Viravong was yesterday quoted in the Vientiane Times saying on Friday “we have nothing to hide”.

At a briefing ahead of the scheduled arrival of Mekong River Commission delegates from Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam yesterday, Viravong reportedly said the activities would have no negative impact on the Mekong River.

But conservationists and downstream countries disagree.

International Rivers Southeast Asia policy coordinator Kirk Herbertson said an announcement made by Lao Foreign Minister Thongloun Sisoulith on Friday that the project had been suspended needed to be treated with caution.

“In order for the project to be fully suspended, all construction would have to stop and the Thai government would have to withdraw funding, cancel the power purchase agreement and order Ch.Karnchang to stop construction,” he said.
 
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