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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Arresting images of how Sydney’s skyline could look by 2050 produced by three leading architectural firms for Urban Taskforce Australia.

The Bates Smart scheme is based on a new metro line for Sydney funded by new super towers within a 200m radius of each station.

The FJMT scheme preserves sun access to parks but projects solar access planes to super heights and then provides new green parks
and walkways including a new green deck over the Harbour Bridge.

The fitzpatrick+partners approach is to disperse the 2050 city into five centres with specialist high rise activities at North Sydney, Central, Woolloomooloo,
White Bay and within the current centre all connected by a new metro circle line.



Originally posted by Sky_Is_The_Limit in Sydney Gossip thread....




Taking Sydney to new heights: How the city could look by the year 2050

EXCLUSIVE JOHN LEHMANN EDITOR-AT-LARGE THE DAILY TELEGRAPH MAY 01

Arresting images of how Sydney’s skyline could look by 2050 produced by three leading architectural firms for Urban Taskforce Australia, have been released To The Daily Telegraph to trigger debate about Sydney’s future in the wake of Australian Bureau of Statistics’ predictions that Melbourne’s population will overtake the *Harbour City in the next 20 years.

Urban Taskforce chief executive Chris Johnson said Sydney needed to increase the economic output of its CBD to keep ahead of Melbourne.

He said Sydney’s urban planners should be aiming to have tens of thousands of people living in the city centre, creating a bigger workforce connected to world finance and consulting services.

A similar approach, on a smaller scale, should be adopted in key centres Parramatta, Chatswood, Liverpool, Penrith and Hurstville.

A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers report found Sydney’s annual economic growth over the past 10 years was 2.2 per cent, while Melbourne’s was 4.7 per cent and Brisbane’s was 4.4 per cent.

Melbourne, Brisbane and Parramatta all have taller buildings planned than Sydney’s CBD.

Mr Johnson said Sydney was being held back by out-of-date planning rules that worked on the basis the 309m tall Sydney Tower should remain the CBD’s tallest building.

In a vision of Sydney for 2045 revealed in The Daily Telegraph on January 1, 2000, the recognisable structure was still the CBD’s tallest building. Mr Johnson said the world now had dozens of high-rise towers planned that are double the height of Sydney Tower, including Kuala Lumpur’s 452m Petronas Towers, Taipei’s 508m Taipei 101 and Dubai’s 828m Burj Khalifa.

He said the architects’ images would “make us wonder (if a) generation jump” in the height of Sydney’s skyline was possible.

“But the same reaction must have occurred in 1882 when the Farmers building (at the corner of Pitt and Market streets) set a new height *record of 27m,’’ he said.

Philip Vivian of architectural firm Bates Smart envisaged the state *government raising up to $7.1 billion through the sale of “super-tall floor space” in the CBD to skyscraper *developers, which would then fund a new metro system.

James Fitzpatrick, of fitzpatrick+partners, visualised Sydney in 2050 as having a series of major centres including North Sydney, Glebe Island, Central Station and Woolloomooloo, connected by a new circular metro line.

Architect Richard Francis-Jones, of Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp, proposed new green parks that cross the Harbour Bridge and Bradfield Highway on suspended decks above existing roadways.

PLANNING PROBLEMS THREATEN OUR CITY John Lehmann

DISJOINTED decision-making by Sydney’s patchwork of small councils is holding the city back while Melbourne gears up to steal away our crown as Australia’s No. 1 capital.

Sydney think tank, the Committee for Sydney, says “radical and concerted action” is urgently needed.

The committee is setting up a taskforce, led by former Parramatta City chief executive Rob Lang, to campaign for change and draft a Sydney 2054 strategy.

On present growth rates Melbourne is predicted to overtake Sydney as Australia’s biggest city in 2053.

The taskforce will include leading business operators, planners and “big thinkers”.

Dr Lang said Melbourne was growing faster than Sydney because it had kept housing prices under control and created more jobs closer to people’s homes.

“To add insult to injury, Melbourne — aided by local council amalgamations and greater collaboration between tiers of government — has a long-term plan that sets out just how they’re going to beat us,’’ he said.

Dr Lang said, with more than 40 councils scattered across Sydney, there was “no single voice” to develop a *vision and strategy.

The committee, chaired by former Sydney mayor Lucy Turnbull, wants a Greater Sydney Authority established to bring focus to planning.

“Business-as-usual will not keep us No. 1,’’ Dr Lang said.

“(Sydney) must overcome the lack of metropolitan leadership and disjointed approach created by a multitude of small local councils and poor co-ordination across government.’’

STRATEGIC FIGHT TO MAINTAIN NO. 1 TITLE

Dr Rob Lang and Lucy Turnbull comment


ON current trends, Melbourne will overtake Sydney as Australia’s biggest city in 2053.

As we find it hard to believe that Sydney can continue to be Australia’s global city while being No. 2 — or that Sydneysiders want that to happen — we believe there needs to be a dynamic response from government, business and the community. We can and must remain the nation’s No. 1 city.

To help identify what will be required we have set up a 2054 Taskforce, made up of leading business figures and big-city thinkers, with one *objective: To ensure Sydney remains both the biggest and best Australian city as well as a leading global city in the Asia-Pacific region.

Sydney is growing in a haphazard way and without a co-ordinated vision. A Sydney 2054 strategy, developed across all tiers of government and capturing the imagination of Sydneysiders, is needed to overcome the lack of leadership and disjointed approach created by a multitude of small local councils and poor co-ordination across government.

Business as usual will not keep us No. 1, something we believe our new Premier understands. Our strategy must be ambitious and co-ordinated.

It must bring together the west and the east of Sydney in a One Sydney approach.

We want the community to help shape this strategy — people who share our passion for Sydney and a determination to make it successful.

This is an opportunity to create the future of Sydney.

Hands up those who want to be No. 2?

We didn’t think so.


http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/national/taking-sydney-to-new-heights-how-the-city-could-look-by-the-year-2050/story-fnii5s40-1226902704336
 

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just wow.
 

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Na, would never happen, CASA has a 300 metre cap on heights and SCC has a 235 metre cap on that.

Is someone saying that in the next 15 years or so, CASA hardware is going to be updated and attitudes are going to change leaving about 20 years for those visions to become reality in 2050.

They do look awesome though.
 

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Na, would never happen, CASA has a 300 metre cap on heights and SCC has a 235 metre cap on that.

Is someone saying that in the next 15 years or so, CASA hardware is going to be updated and attitudes are going to change leaving about 20 years for those visions to become reality in 2050.

They do look awesome though.
Also factor in that grey haired NIMBY will be died off by then, it would be a perfect recipe for visionary construction boom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lots of this vision is very possible in a shorter timeframe than 2050.

Density is a good thing for everybody and necessary in a big modern city.

These visions hopefully will show people at all levels that SYD needs to start now.

"A similar approach, on a smaller scale, should be adopted in key centres Parramatta, Chatswood, Liverpool, Penrith and Hurstville"

Parramatta is a great example of what can happen in a very short time.


 

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Thanks for posting all the links and images upwards, am reading through them all now.

I noticed the Urban Ideas brochure lists skyscrapercity as a useful website :)
 

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Some thoughts

FJMT
1. Do not like the idea of expanding Prince Alfred Park to the extent that it is the dominant land use above Central Station. This is our major train station, serviced by the vast majority of rail lines on the Sydney Trains / NSW Trains networks and both of the future light rail lines. Because of its good transport connections, the airspace needs to be heavily developed.

2. Question the aesthetic benefits of a suspended green deck on the Harbour Bridge. By the time you put up barbed wire to stop suicides and noise barriers to block traffic and train noise, it wouldn't be a particularly nice location to sit and ponder.

3. I wonder if their scope for this scheme excluded Eveleigh / Bays Precinct / Garden Island?

Bates Smart

1. Their metro concept excludes Parramatta - considering the development expected to take place in Parramatta and the east-west demand you'd expect this to generate, I think a metro would need to extend to Parramatta / Westmead.

2. $7.1 billion may be enough to fund a metro in the CBD, however it would be a drop in the ocean for significant coverage across the inner ring suburbs.

fitzpatrick and partners

1. I don't think it's a good idea to build visually intrusive skyscrapers at Garden Island.

2. Bays Precinct has a good approach where the skyscrapers are focused at Glebe Island, away from immediate shadow / height / bulk impacts on Balmain or Rozelle.

3. No to a bridge between the Headland Park at Barangaroo and McMahons Point.
 

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Given the State Government's desire to maximise return from assets, it is conceivable that development similar to these visions could be achieved in both the Central-Eveleigh precinct and the White Bay precinct.
 
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