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Plan change 48

^^ What's plan change 48? I haven't heard about it before...
It was a comprehensive review of the district plan for wellington's Central Area. There were lots of changes to heritage areas, rules about height and mass, and other details (online here, if you enjoy reading that sort of thing), but the main change was an emphasis on urban design rather than just planning. Before, if a proposal met all the rules but was still of poor quality, there was little that could be done to stop or improve it. Now, there's more scope for urban designers to assess the quality of a building and its effect upon the streetscape, and with luck it might help to lift the bar for developers. On the other side, it also means that a development might be allowed to breach the rules on occasion if it's of exceptional quality or gives something special to the city.
 

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il Casino Appartmento

Is it just me or is every apartment block being marketed as "up market" these days :)

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/BU0804/S00313.htm


Il Casino Site To Become Up-Market Development
Thursday, 17 April 2008, 11:11 am

Press Release: Sorenson Group PR

Il Casino Site To Become Up-Market Development

Remiro Bresolin’s former Il Casino restaurant, which was known as Wellington’s ‘most Italian of restaurants’, is to be transformed into an up-market residential development to be called ‘Appartamento Il Casino’.

The development, on the corner of Tory and Jessie Streets, will have up to 31 apartments over nine floors. Occupying the ground floor there will be a specialist café and possibly a restaurant, and ample resident parking.

Stephen McDougall, director of leading architectural practice Studio of Pacific Architecture, has designed the development which will retain the well-known original Tory Streetfaçade of the restaurant. The development is being undertaken by award-winning Wellingtoncompany, Globe Holdings.

Globe Holdings director Andrew Fawcet says, “We sought permission to use the restaurant’s name and Remiro Bresolin graciously gave us his blessing before he passed away in March 2007. This has enabled the development to preserve a little of Wellington’s history and the memories associated with Remiro and his restaurant.”

The apartments, planned to rise above the façade, will comprise a mix of one bedroom and two bedroom dwellings, some with a study, and on the upper levels, three and four bedroom apartments with a study. The two bedroom and three bedroom apartments will have two bathrooms and generous balconies.

“Our desire was for a building with more personality and character than that found in other contemporary apartment blocks. The brief to our architects was to create a building that would continue as a landmark and contribute something to the City; time will tell whether we’ve succeeded, but we’re confident that this will be the best development that Globe has embarked upon to date,” Mr Fawcet said.

The apartments will be highly specified with chef’s kitchens, floor to ceiling windows, heated bathroom floors, timber decks and walk-in or built in wardrobes. The living and dining areas of each apartment will feature reverse cycle ceiling mounted air conditioning. Security features will include deadlocks on apartment entry doors, access care entry from street level with intercom access for visitors and video capability to an internal MATV system.

Car parking will be provided for by way of a state-of-the-art fully automated car stacker, with secure parking over 40 cars.

Two of Globe Holdings’ recent developments, The Summit Apartments on Molesworth Streetand the Courtyard houses which form part of The Waterfront Seatoun, have achieved recognition by winning the Wellington NZ Institute of Architects (NZIA) Resene Awards for Architecture in 2006. The Summit Apartments also won the NZIA 2006 Resene Colour Award.

Globe Holdings has previously been recognised by a Year of the Built Environment Award for The Waterfront Seatoun, the NZIA 2003 Wellington Urban Design Award for The Waterfront Seatoun’s masterplan, and an NZIA Resene Local Award for Architecture for its Croxley Mills development on Frederick Street, Wellington.

The Appartamento Il Casino development will be marketed by leading Wellingtonreal estate agency Tommy’s in conjunction with Globe Holdings.

“We envisage that Appartamento Il Casino will appeal to owner-occupiers who want to enjoy high quality inner-city living without compromise. The design provides great indoor/outdoor flow making the most of natural light and the city landscape while the security features enable owners to lock and leave their home without worry, while they are away on business or out of town. This will result in considerable interest from those who need a central Wellington residence during the week but might have a holiday home in the Wairarapa or further afield,” Mr Fawcet said.


ENDS
 

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Upcoming developments?

Walked through Willis St today, there was a notice outside Munns Menswear (22-26 Willis):

Suit Hire Closed!

Due to the up and coming demolition of this site, Munns will no longer be able to offer the suit hire service.

All product booked prior to the 10/4/08 will be honoured in store.

If you have any further queries please ask for Warren or Jason.

We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.
And the Vodafone retail shop @ 78 Willis has just closed down.

Both sites have been marketed for development in the past, so development rumours are bound to circulate.
 

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^^ And just to add to the speculation, I noticed Vault on Willis st is moving out by June, and the clothes shop on the same floor has already gone. My my, paints a mighty interesting picture!! Hopefully we'll get an announcement from the Wellington Company about their big "Wellington Central" development soon!
 

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PS: Construction of Cubana Apartments is finally under way, after laying quiet for a few months. The diggers were hard at it, even at night.
 

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Walked through Willis St today, there was a notice outside Munns Menswear (22-26 Willis):



And the Vodafone retail shop @ 78 Willis has just closed down.

Both sites have been marketed for development in the past, so development rumours are bound to circulate.
Perhaps has something to do with whats happening in this photo I took last year:
(note: the date is wrong it was taken later in the year than shown)
Something being done at 22 Willis st. Appears to be drilling. Any ideas about what, if anything, is going to happen?

and perhaps has something to do with this rendering from way back:



If this is whats happening, or a similar height development then I'm excited. Double excited if the same is true about the vodafone thing.
 

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With Chews Lane, the proposed tower above New World and another next door - alongside the existing BNZ Centre at one end and Majestic Centre at the other - the bottom of Willis St should turn out to be quite dense. Excellent.
 

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How Wellington might grow
The Dominion Post | Friday, 25 April 2008

Lyall Bay Pde could be transformed into a high-quality residential area, Karori Rd's shopping areas would have apartments upstairs and Berhampore's Luxford St become a "little corridor" with 250 new homes.

Wellington City Council's discussion document "How and where will Wellington grow?" sets out proposals for accommodating thousands of extra people in infill housing in the capital by 2051.

The central city, Johnsonville and Adelaide Rd would get the biggest numbers, but city planners have also picked out smaller areas with potential for growth. They have given estimates of how many extra houses and people each of the 12 areas can fit by 2051 and identified opportunities for affordable housing.

The proposals set out specific maps for each area, with taller buildings closer to the town centres.

For example, the Karori Rd corridor would run from Morley St to Marsden Village, with apartments above the ground floor in the two village centres. Within 50 metres of the centres, three-storey or four-storey medium density apartments and terrace houses would be built.

Within 100 metres, the apartments, terrace houses and townhouses would be two or three storeys high.

Councillor Andy Foster said the document reflected the biggest change in city planning policy since 1994, when "what we allowed was essentially ad-hoc infill".

City planning manager Luke Troy said: "The biggest thing is certainty. The problem with the old approach was you never knew what would be next door.

"You will know where you stand and you can make your decision over where you want to be."

"How and where will Wellington grow?" will be open for consultation from May 10 till July 7. Summary pamphlets will be sent to ratepayers.

Areas for infill housing:

Parts of Wellington where infill housing will be encouraged, with the number of homes, and the number of people being housed. The plans involve a mix of apartments, terrace housing and townhouses.
  • Central city: 8500 extra homes and 13,500 extra people by 2051.
  • Johnsonville centre: 1700-2000 homes; 2800-3500 people.
  • Adelaide Rd: 1000-1700 homes, 1500-2700 people.
  • Kilbirnie town centre: 600 homes, 950 people.
  • Riddiford St: 500 homes, 850 people.
  • Tawa town centre: 1100 homes, 1800 people.
  • Karori Rd corridor: 500 homes, 850 people.
  • Miramar town centre: 1000 homes, 1600 people.
  • Newlands centre: 420 homes, 670 people.
  • Crofton Downs centre: 140 homes, 250 people.
  • Lyall Bay Parade: 250 homes, 400 people.
  • Luxford St (Berhampore) 250 homes, 400 people

Areas of character protection:

Inner-city residential suburbs: Thorndon, lower Kelburn, Aro Valley, Mt Cook, Mt Victoria and most of Berhampore and Newtown. They are already subject to pre-1930 demolition rules.

Coastal fringe areas: Scorching, Karaka and Worser bays, Seatoun, Breaker Bay, Moa Pt, part of Lyall Bay and Houghton, Island and Owhiro bays.

Other areas being considered for character protection are: Crawford Green reserve area (Miramar), Glen Rd area and west Bolton St area (Kelburn), "consistent streetscape areas" east and south of Kilbirnie town centre, "consistent streetscape areas" in Karori (such as Messines Rd and areas around Nottingham and Standen streets), Aro Valley village, Kelburn village, Brooklyn village, Hataitai village, commercial buildings around Luxford and Rintoul streets (Berhampore), commercial buildings around Mersey St and at the seaward end of The Parade (Island Bay).
 

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metroman
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That's an incredibly slow growth if that is to be by the year 2051. Christchurch is aiming for another 15-20,000 to live in the innercity within a decade and a half. A lot can happen, at the moment Wellington's growth rate is reasonably slow, unlike where I live which is the Sunshine Coast. I can't help thinking, that with such good infrastructure which is being developed in Wellington that the region could grow significantly bigger than that.
 

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That's an incredibly slow growth if that is to be by the year 2051. Christchurch is aiming for another 15-20,000 to live in the innercity within a decade and a half. A lot can happen, at the moment Wellington's growth rate is reasonably slow, unlike where I live which is the Sunshine Coast. I can't help thinking, that with such good infrastructure which is being developed in Wellington that the region could grow significantly bigger than that.
Then again, ChCh is starting from a smaller base, CBD wise. It'll probably continue to grow outwards in spite of any smart growth policy by the CCC, since they're not going to run out of space anytime soon.

If in the outside chance Lloyd Morrison pulls off the B787 thing, or if Google etc opens a data centre in Wellington, that would change the equation entirely.
 

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stupid sexy flanders
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^^ Exactly. Remember also how compact Wellingtons CBD is and how many people already live it. There is hardly any room due to topography, geology and density of buildings especially in the Lambton or Parliament Quarters for instance. Therefore most new residents will be around Cuba and Willis which are already pretty congested. An increase of 25000 people in the CBD will result in the skyline resembling Hong Kong. (Not a bad thing I suppose).

In comparison Christchurchs CBD is flat and vast with only Hagley Park as a natural boundary. There are unlimited opportunities within the 4 avenues for tens of thousands of additional residents. Even the absolute centre of the city from Victoria Square to Cashel Street has plenty of lots available for residential development.

You cant compare the two.
 

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metroman
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I think Wellington is a great little spot and once people start finding out about the place which they are starting to, from an overseas experience then the place will attract more interest. The airport sounds great.:lol:
 

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More on 151-159 Willis St

Turns out Phil Stratford is still in charge of this project, seems he's turned to a different revenue stream for it. Hopefully it's been through the council's urban design panel.

~~~~~~~~

Sunday Star-Times; 20/04/2008, pD6

Park your investment here for a concrete return

Edition: A, Section: BUSINESS, pg. D6

~~~~~~~~

Rob STOCK

WE'VE HAD the "Green Gold" rush to invest in forestry, the "Black Gold" rush to profit from rising oil prices, the "Blue Gold" rush to invest in water resources, and now one property developer wants the public to invest in "Grey Gold".

Wellington-based Philip Stratford uses the term to refer to car parks - "grey" because that's the colour of the drab concrete they're made from.

Stratford is selling the freehold unit titles to 300 of the 353 spaces in a Willis St, Wellington, car parking building he owns to help fund the development of apartments on the building's roof and a serviced apartments hotel in front.

The asking price is $55,000-$60,000 plus GST, and each title comes with a "guaranteed nett 6%" yield for the first two years.

The guarantee is a personal one, not one investors pay an inflated purchase price for, says Stratford, who achieved fame and then notoriety as the founder of Renouf Properties, which was merged into Renouf Corporation, which he briefly headed as chief executive.

He then became embroiled in the collapse of investment firm Energycorp, which ultimately led to his headline- making bankruptcy in 1989.

He bases his optimism on the current occupancy rates for the car park which is managed by Tournament Parking: "The full sign is switched on three to four times a week," he said.

The addition of serviced and privately owned apartments on the roof and in front will increase that, Stratford predicted, as well as driving up the capital value of the sites.

Stratford said one major bank had agreed to provide finance of up to $40,000 on each car park. That translated as 67-73% finance, which provided a hint at the level of comfort the bank has in the car park market and the security it needs to lend into it.

Colliers' car park specialist Roger Seavill says car parking spaces have been good investments for those who bought them a few years ago and are typically selling for yields of between 6 and 8%.

While yields like that might look good compared to residential property investment, it's less than can be had by putting cash on deposit at a bank, Seavill says.

But it's not hard to find examples of unit-titled car parking spaces that have proven themselves good investments, he says.

At Auckland's old Farmers Building on Hobson St prices have risen from $18,000 at purchase a decade ago, to more than $40,000, based on recent sales, he said. Sales of some spaces have gone even higher.

Stratford talks of some recently sold unit-titled car parks in Wellington selling for upwards of $70,000.

He's confident city populations will continue to rise far faster than new car parking space becomes available.

"There are no car parking buildings being considered by Wellington City Council, and yet we are fixing up the Hutt motorway to get people into the city faster."

Traditionally, Seavill said, real estate agents haven't been too excited about selling individual car parking spaces as the sums involved were small and so were the commissions.

The market may get more profile in the coming years. Colliers has launched a website dedicated to car parking real estate, www.carparknz.co.nz to provide a shop window for those with spaces to sell or lease.

--------------------

CAPTION:

Investing in car parks could provoke a grey-gold rush.

Picture: Neville Marriner
 

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Munns Menswear happened to be open after work today, and the sales guys confirmed that the whole row from Munns to the Paddington Coat Factory (22-48 Willis St) will be meeting the wrecking ball. Other than that, plans are still under wraps. Unless it's two separate developments, it's plausible that Willis Central will be bigger than first thought. :banana:
 

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Sounds like something big is Brewing ....

Munns Menswear happened to be open after work today, and the sales guys confirmed that the whole row from Munns to the Paddington Coat Factory (22-48 Willis St) will be meeting the wrecking ball. Other than that, plans are still under wraps. Unless it's two separate developments, it's plausible that Willis Central will be bigger than first thought. :banana:
:cheers:
 
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