SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 71 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yemen, Djibouti bridge part of $200bn project.

A property firm owned by a Saudi businessman from the bin Laden family plans to spearhead a $200 billion project next year to connect Africa to the Arabian Peninsula with a bridge across the Red Sea, the region's largest infrastructure project by far.

Dubai-based Middle East Development, in which Osama bin Laden's half brother Tarek owns a majority stake, will begin work in 2009 on the project to build two cities in Djibouti and Yemen and a 28.5-kilometre bridge, a company official said.

"The bin Laden family is originally from Yemen... they want to fight poverty, unemployment and connect the Gulf Arab region with Muslim Africa," Issam Halabi, vice president for technical affairs, told reporters on the sidelines of a Meed conference in Dubai on Monday.


The group will invest at least $10 billion in the project and seek to raise the remainder from other investors and financial institutions.

The bridge, to be the development's centrepiece, will carry vehicles, trains, natural gas and water, Halabi said.

The bridge aims to provide a safe route between the Arabian Peninsula and the Horn of Africa region as the waterway between them is highly dangerous due to Somali pirates.

Somalia has been without an effective central government since the 1991 toppling of a military dictator, allowing anarchy and violence to flourish.

Denmark's Cowi, the consultant on the world's longest, planned causeway linking Qatar with Bahrain, is advising on the bridge.

The bridge will cost $14 billion, with construction of the entire scheme completed in phases over seven to 15 years, Halabi said.

"We will have seed capital of at least $10 billion... and $190 billion in project finance," Halabi said, adding that private investors would also participate, primarily through build-operate-transfer contracts.

The project has attracted interest from companies including US firms Bechtel and Hewlett-Packard, Sweden's Ericsson and Veolia Environnement of France, according to Halabi.

The company aims to house as many as five million people in Yemen and 1.5 million in Djibouti under the project.

The "Noor" cities will include residential, commercial, healthcare and entertainment areas, Halabi said, and would create about one million jobs.

Yemen, one of the world's poorest countries, has faced unrest over unemployment and rising prices in the south and renewed fighting between government forces and Shi'ite Muslim rebels in the north.

Middle East Development Singapore is a unit of Middle East Development.

The firm has projects in Syria, Dubai and Yemen, according to its website. (Reuters)

link: http://www.arabianbusiness.com/520959-red-sea-bridge-to-link-yemen-and-djibouti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More news with renders!

American firm to build a bridge across the Red Sea.

5/1/2007
By Tom Sawyer

Acting on endorsements and pledges of land from the president of Yemen and the president of the African nation of Djibouti, a Dubai-based developer has tapped an American firm to build a bridge across the Red Sea.





Middle East Development LLC on April 25 issued a notice-to-proceed to Noor City Development Corp., Napa, Calif. It authorizes Noor City, as sole agent, "to proceed with the planning, development, construction and management of the bridge between Yemen and Djibouti."

MED is chaired by Tarek M. Bin Laden. His second-generation company, a powerhouse of construction in the Middle East, labors under the dark reputation of Bin Laden's notorious half-brother, Osama Bin Laden. While Osama's name is an anathema to much of the world, the greater Bin Laden family has a long history of driving major construction and development in the region. Its work continues today with signature projects throughout the region. Tarek Bin Laden turns aside questions about his half brother, saying he has no contact with him and no knowledge of his whereabouts.

The newly formed Noor City Development Corp. is led by Tariq E. Ayyad, president. Ayyad is also president of ShareChive LLC, San Francisco, a technology firm with patented systems for delivering constantly refreshed project data to mobile computers on jobsites, with an emphasis on highway and large infrastructure. Ayyad is an American of Kuwaiti extraction, a civil engineer, construction manager and a former bridge engineer with the California Dept. of Transportation.

Ayyad says MED's goal is to create economic opportunity and stability on both sides of the Red Sea by tying in the bridge to new rail and road construction hubs and networks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

"MED is a developer. They want to create jobs, they want to move products," Ayyad says. "It is very, very critical to connect the African nations and their products and crops right to the Middle East. The Middle East is extremely wealthy in money and oil, but we lack quite a lot of crops and services."

Noor City is forming an international commission to refine concepts for a design/build/operate/transfer concession to create the rail and highway crossing. Concepts developed by Danish engineering firm COWI envision a 28.5 km crossing with a suspension span over the Bab al Mendab Straits.

Phase I will likely be a 3.5 km leap to the Yemeni island of Perim and a 4 km land link to the western channel. Phase II may be broken into several contracts for the 21.5 km transit to Djibouti, which will include 13 km of suspension bridge and 8 km of girder bridge. Cost is estimated at between $10 billion and $20 billion, depending on design, project organization and financing. Construction would take seven to nine years.

"If you open up to this [transportation system that provides access into the heart of Africa] then you can create jobs by moving products, moving services," Ayyad says. "You can ignite economic development just by the transportation element. The bridge is really critical."

source:
http://nazret.com/blog/index.php?title=ethiopia_yemen_american_firm_to_build_a_&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
This whole project seems insane.:nuts: 200 BILLION!!!! in the poorest region on earth. How will they ever get a return for their money. I welcome the project because it will bring a lot of business to the area but Im still puzzled by it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
This whole project seems insane.:nuts: 200 BILLION!!!! in the poorest region on earth. How will they ever get a return for their money. I welcome the project because it will bring a lot of business to the area but Im still puzzled by it.
Despite the enormous price tag, developers said they don't expect to have much trouble raising private capital to build the bridge, given the flood of petrodollars in the Middle East these days.




Tarek Bin Laden's Red Sea bridge
A company owned by Osama Bin Laden's half-brother has proposed building a bridge across Mandab Strait on the Red Sea, to link Djibouti to Yemen.
Tarek Bin Laden Construction is negotiating with the two governments about plans for the 28.5km bridge - one of the longest in the world.

The proposed bridge would carry a six-lane motorway and a railway.

Apart from the $70bn cost, critics have pointed out that the project would be sited in an earthquake zone.

New cities would be built at either end of the bridge.

Tarek Bin Laden has spent time lobbying politicians in Djibouti and Yemen to accept his proposal to build the bridge across the Mandab Strait, from Djibouti to Yemen's Perim Island, which is the narrowest stretch of sea between the two countries.

Djibouti Prime Minister Dileita Mohamed Dileita told the AFP news agency his government was not actively involved.

"The project fell on us from the sky with the proposal by Osama Bin Laden's brother, who has a construction company in Saudi Arabia," Mr Dieita said.

"People are talking about it a lot here - the Yemenis are convinced the project will be carried out with Saudi and Emirates' funds to connect the Arab world to Africa."

The new town in Djibouti would be called the City of Light.

"Numerous American, Yemeni and even French businesses are taking part in the project," the prime minister said.

"But the big advantage will be to take millions of African Muslims to Mecca, by train or by bus".

But the bridge would not only benefit pilgrims - hundreds of African migrants drown each year trying to reach Yemen from Djibouti's neighbour, Somalia.

If the bridge were ever constructed, it would be among the world's longest.


The longest existing cross-sea bridge is the 32-km Donghai Bridge in China.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7259427.stm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Investors in tiny Djibouti are thinking big!

Investors in tiny Djibouti are thinking big
By Jeffrey Gettleman

Friday, May 30, 2008
DJIBOUTI: For centuries, nomads have dropped down from the rocky hills around here to carve bricks of salt from an ancient lake and haul them away on the backs of camels.

But a new salt miner is trying his hand, and he may be a harbinger of what is to come.

"As a salt person, my first impression was why was all this salt just sitting here," said Daniel Sutton, an American salt miner who is overseeing a new $70 million operation to industrialize the collection of Djibouti's plentiful salt. "There's 50 square miles of salt. It runs 20 to 30 feet deep. This could be huge."

Djibouti is becoming the little country of big dreams. Hundreds of millions of dollars of overseas investment are pouring in, promising to turn this sleepy, sweltering ministate, which does not even have a stoplight, into something of an African trade center.

There are gold miners from India, geothermal experts from Iceland, Turkish hotel managers, Saudi oil engineers, French bankers and American military contractors. Tycoons from Dubai are pumping in a billion dollars just on their own, largely for the country's all-important port, a gateway to the region. There is even a project on paper to build a multibillion-dollar, 28-kilometer, or 18-mile, bridge across the Red Sea, captained by Tarek bin Laden, the half-brother Osama bin Laden.

Djibouti does not have many people - about 500,000 - and few outsiders have heard of it. Its soil is mostly sand; it is unearthly hot, often more than 35 degrees Celsius (100 Fahrenheit); and just about everything - including bottled water, rice and gasoline - is imported.

But the country's draw is it location. Djibouti sits at the mouth of the Red Sea, where Africa and Asia nearly touch. It overlooks some of the busiest shipping lanes in the world, especially for oil heading from the Gulf to Europe and the United States. And because of its strategic position, both France and the United States have military bases here.

Shipping is already big business in this country - and it is getting even bigger, with investors from Dubai hoping to expand the Port of Djibouti to three million containers a year from its current capacity of 300,000. Dubai World, a large holding company, has also bought a controlling share in a local airline and built an industrial park, new roads and a $200 million, five-star hotel.

"Djibouti is perfectly positioned to become a services and logistics hub," said Jerome Martins Oliveira, chief executive of the port, which is operated by a subsidiary of Dubai World.

He said Djibouti could become a key link between the raw materials of Africa and the oil wealth of Arabia, with Dubai as its main partner.

Dubai is the country's model for development, said the Djiboutian foreign minister, Mahmoud Ali Youssouf. "We're a small country with a big port," he said "And we're even better located than Dubai."

Clearly, Djibouti has a long way to go. Djibouti is ranked 149 of 177 on the United Nations human development index, which measures life span, education and income.

But Djibouti's smallness - it basically has one city, known as Djibouti town - is a virtue, business people say.

"If you need something, the government responds very fast," said Nikhil Bhuta, the chief financial officer for the JB Group, an Indian mining company.

Bhuta said he had set up mines across Africa but had never experienced such generous terms of business as the deal he struck to split gold profits 80 percent for his company, 20 percent for the government. "In Africa, you never even get 50 percent," he said.

Other selling points are a stable currency that is pegged to the U.S. dollar, excellent French food and the fact that Djibouti is an outpost of relative stability in the Horn of Africa, a region plagued by war, famine and drought - sometimes all at the same time.

"If you want to participate in the development of this region, Djibouti is the only place to be," said Ould Amar Yahya, the director of a commercial bank that opened a branch in Djibouti a year ago. "Ethiopia has too many regulations. Sudan has the embargo. Eritrea has serious problems, and Somalia is too violent."

Yahya said that his branch opened 10 to 15 new accounts a day and that profits had shot up 70 percent the first six months of 2008 compared with the same period last year.

But there is a very visible cloud on the horizon: Eritrea. Djibouti's prickly neighbor recently moved more than 1,000 soldiers into a disputed border zone, and Djiboutian officials fear that war might break out at any moment. The troops are heavily armed and very close.

"We've got a lot going on right now," Youssouf said. "Maybe the Eritreans are jealous."

Local customs can also be a bit of a minefield. The population here is predominantly Muslim, divided between Somalis and Afars, a nomadic group that plies the desert and sticks to its traditions.

Sutton said that shortly after he arrived to begin the salt mining operation, an Afar chief threatened to kill him.

The chief was apparently angry that Sutton had not paid his respects. The chief's people live around the salt flats.

Sutton said that he had agreed to hire as many Afars as possible and that he and the chief were now friends.

Source: Herald Tribune


We will see, the bridge will have no negativ impact for that country at all!
 

·
Madinah Munawwarah, KSA
Joined
·
158 Posts
Al-Noor cities — ‘bridge of the horns’
Mahmoud Ahmed | Arab News

DJIBOUTI: Prime Minister of Djibouti Dilita Muhammad Dilita and officials from Al-Noor Holding Company of Tariq Binladen attended launch ceremony on Monday to establish 2 industrial cities — one in Yemen and the other in Djibouti — which will be linked by a road and rail bridge across the Red Sea.

The two cities are to be built at a cost of $200 billion and will be the first physical connection between Africa and the Middle East since the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869.

The so-called “Bridge of the Horns” promises to be one of the great engineering feats of recent times linking Yemen to the island of Perim in the Red Sea, and on to Djibouti in Africa.

The ceremony was held at Kempinski Hotel here and was attended by official delegations from 19 countries. The Al-Noor Holding Company is undertaking the giant project for which it has so far collected $50 billion from investors in Saudi Arabia, Gulf countries, Europe and China.

“The realization of this dream began the day the project contract was signed between President of Djibouti Ismail Omer Jeelah and Tariq Binladen,” Al-Noor Holding Company said in a statement, adding that the project will make engineering history, and boost the future prosperity of emerging economies in Africa and the Middle East.

Tariq Binladen said the project will provide more than a million job opportunities in Yemen and half a million in Djibouti.

Under the project, one Al-Noor city will be established in Yemen on an area of 1,500 sq. kms and another city bearing the same name in Djibouti on 1,000 sq. kms. The two twin cities will be linked by a bridge that will be able to carry a six-lane highway and four light rail lines, as well as water and oil pipelines. According to Muhammad Ahmed Al-Ahmed, CEO of Al-Noor Holding Company, the bridge will be 28.5 kms long, comprising of girder and suspension bridge structures. “The suspension portion of the bridge will be the longest in the world. It is anticipated that about 100,000 cars and 50,000 rail passengers will cross the bridge daily in addition to thousands of tons of cargo in trucks and rail wagons,” he added. “Having developed the business plan and master-plans for the two cities and the bridge, we’re now ready to talk to potential investors about the opportunities that exist within this ground-breaking project,” he added. Al-Noor cities project has indicated the initial phase of planning is complete and agreements are in place with the Yemeni and Djibouti governments to commence investment discussions with institutional investors, private investors, corporations and governments, he added.

“We’re interested in developing many forms of investments including the early stage where the potential for capital growth exists until operational ramp-up,” Al-Ahmed said, adding, “for investors, there are many options and investment vehicles we will consider related to the project; not just in the two cities, but also in the related infrastructure.” The Red Sea is one of the busiest and most important seaways in the world and is also one of the most dangerous due to the great irregularity and complexity of water currents.

Ship traffic primarily travels north or south currently; getting resources and people east or west across this constant traffic by ship would be close to impossible and treacherous. The bridge will also allow much greater speed of transit, and more cargo and people to be transported from one point to another.

The characteristics being designed into the cities will ensure they rival some of the major trade, financial, business and tourism hubs of the world. The urban planning will consider the synergy of each district to its neighbor making ease of business and travel cornerstones of each city’s heartbeat.

The geographical location of the cities in Djibouti and Yemen make them obvious trade and distribution hubs that will link major trade routes through Africa, the Middle East and beyond. As in any major urban infrastructure development, the Al-Noor cities will house all the services essential to a modern, hi-tech, connected metropolis.

Aside from essential services, the project will also feature free trade zones, research and development campuses, technology parks, financial districts and major commercial and business districts to house the worlds leading commercial entities. The cities will also house some finest educational institutions, leading-edge medical facilities and high end tourism attractions making the cities compelling destinations in what will soon be the most dynamic markets in the world.

“The goal of the Al-Noor cities project is to create globally integrated cities bridging two continents that deliver a major shift in not just the economies of Yemen and Djibouti, but the regional economy of the Middle East and Africa. These two city developments, linked by a bridge across the Red Sea, will be the catalyst for economic growth for generations to come,” Al-Ahmed concluded.

http://www.arabnews.com/?page=6&sec...m=7&y=2008&pix=business.jpg&category=Business
 

·
Expert
Joined
·
21,675 Posts
This Bridge will be Longer than the Bridge in Lagos which is currently the longest in Africa, at 12.5 km
 

·
Expert
Joined
·
21,675 Posts
^^Tbite, we are talking among the longest bridges in the world!
The Bridge in Lagos is among the longest in the world.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
What is the security situation like in Djibouti?

I am very excited by this story, but have never been to this region and do not know enough about it. Do problems in places like Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia have an impact in Djibouti?

Will the presence of United States and French/Dutch Military in Djibouti make the place a target?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
What is the security situation like in Djibouti?

I am very excited by this story, but have never been to this region and do not know enough about it. Do problems in places like Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia have an impact in Djibouti?

Will the presence of United States and French/Dutch Military in Djibouti make the place a target?
^^its probably the same as Dubai being next to Iraq, Iran, and the Middle East in general. Or the same as Qatar basing U.S. troops for the Iraq mission....or Germany being just north of the Caucasus, Bosnia, Serbia, Kosovo and at the same time hosting U.S. Europe Command.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,329 Posts
What is the security situation like in Djibouti?

I am very excited by this story, but have never been to this region and do not know enough about it. Do problems in places like Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia have an impact in Djibouti?

Will the presence of United States and French/Dutch Military in Djibouti make the place a target?
Djibouti is a safe country. That's what happens when you have two major Western military in your country, plus the city shuts down in the middle of the afternoon from what I heard. It's too hot to do much there.

Plus, the parts of Somalia (Somaliland rather) that Djibouti borders is actually quite safe and stable. The only real dangerous part of Somalia, known as Mogadishu, is over 1000km away. The thing that I hate to hear is the idea that all of Somalia is a warzone...the vast majority of it is not.

I don't believe that the borders of Ethiopia and Eritrea are dangerous either, although Eritrea with their "napoleon complex" is kind of aggressive against Djibouti and they are kind of in the middle of a problem right now. But it's nowhere near anything of significance and I think the whole thing blew over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
This bridge will cost $200,000,000,000?! I could easily build an entirely new city housing 1,000,000 people with that kind of money! This bridge should cost about $10-15 billion.
 

·
Student Architect جاري&#15
GG
Joined
·
5,877 Posts
They should just give the money to the people or even better, me.:colgate: waaaaay to expensive, even for one of the longest in the world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
^^Where's the rest of the project?
 
1 - 20 of 71 Posts
Top