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What I mean by " mixed " is so many different classes of neighborhoods that surrounds our area by less than a mile , I live in a condo complex we have college kids , young professionals , families , single people , snow birds , blue collar folks including people from 25 different nations which I think is really cool .
behind our complex there is the ghetto , in front of our complex there are multimillion dollar homes , to the east of our complex , there are well established middle class neighborhoods , a couple of blocks down the road , it is the shopping areas and the industrial zone with several lower middle class / working class neighboorhoods .
in our condo complex we have people ranging from section 8 / poor all the way up to very wealthy doctors / a couple of lawyers as well .
Does any one in here live in an area that is so diverse like here ?
 

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ONE WORLD
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^sounds pretty much like most of London.

Residential mixing of classes is a Victorian tradition (grand developments made more of a statement in salubrious districts and thus commanded higher prices) and was exacerbated in the Twentieth Century as once grand mansion blocks were subdivided into bedsits for the poor, whilst on the other hand council tower blocks were gentrified by 'pioneering' yuppies. Thus rich and poor really did live cheek by jowl, not just street by street, and often swapping buildings. Today this has translated into legislation that demands every large development no matter how luxury devotes 30-50% of its units to affordable homes.

I live in the Jamaican part of town (Brixton) though, like all of London's ethnic foci, is actually majority White or mixed rather than the ethnicity it represents. Although the district caters to a specific community the shoppers that congregate here actually live elsewhere. In fact the highest minority cut anywhere in the London metro is only 65% in the Central Slough ward (Pakistani), despite the fact that at the very lowest counts the city is 40% minority. This comes as quite a surprise to many Londoners themselves used to so many ethnic foci across the city. Although Brixton's High street and markets are dominated by Black shoppers, they only make up 24% of the people who actually live here.
 

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ONE WORLD
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My building is a 7 storey Victorian apartment block for about 300 people, a mix of upper middle class families, middle class young renters and poor benefits recipients. The units are small if youre sharing (we don't actually have a living room), but it has a huge community roof terrace that stretches across two blocks and looks like something off a magazine cover - which it in fact was used for, aswell as a porn shoot according to lore. Across from us is another grand building, that for the past decade has been used as a squat for posh art students, hippies and lots of young Italian travellers. Round the corner is a once notorious council estate, now being 'colonised' by middle class yuppies and rows of stucco mansions, some of them subdivided up into bedsits, others remaining multi-million £ homes. The 200m street I'm on has 5 pub/ bars, 3 takeaways (Middle Eastern/ Caribbean), 5 restaurants (Jamaican /Eritrean / Japanese / Indonesian/ Thai), a hotel and 2 clubs, one an underground 24 hour drum n bass dive, the other a rooftop gay terrace. The nail salon is Chinese and their children play in the Jamaican Jerk Chicken stops on either side, two hairdressers specialise in European hair, the other four for Afro-Caribbean, one second hand shop for assorted junk, the other for fine books, one record studio/ music centre for urban beats, the other reggae, a musical equipment store, a health food shop, three cafes - one traditional London caff, another a Greek deli, the last a posh duck egg specialist (run by Thais), a vegan cupcake shop, a pub that was once a haunting ground for serial killers, an always empty police station (tiny) and a famous live music bar on the corner popular with teenagers. At the other end is a trendy cinema and bar where you can drink while watching the film. The Jamaicans play backgammon on tables outside the reggae shop, from every generation, and alot of weed is smoked on the street by all races - its tolerated and not an arrestable offence. It's not quiet, but is packed with residentials above. I hate the corner music bar.

Overall the area has a reputation for nightlife, drugs, music, food, artists and gangs. - The covered art deco market behind us, once falling into neglect has come roaring back to life as London's new foodie destination with startup restaurants of amazing quality and cheap price attracted by the council offering free or low rents in the difficult economic climes. We now have the best Mexican, pizza (complete with Neapolitan ovens and bakers), okonomiya (Japanese omelette), and gourmet burger joints in the entire city yet all at prices under a tenner, plus some of the best cafes, bakers, dumpling stops and patisseries - the queues are growing. The market outside is predominantly ethnic for halal meats, saris, bushmeat, fishmongers, Pan American products, Black hair specialists (run by Middle Easterners), Chinese supermarkets and Jerk Chicken and exotic fruit stalls - but a vintage section has set up, a sure sign of gentrification. The area is the centre of the Jamaican community and is next door to the mixed Portuguese and Brazilian community up the road - this has also attracted other large Caribbean, African and Latin American minorities such as the Colombians, Venezuelans, St Lucians, Ghanaians and new kids on the block, the Mexicans.
 

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Unlike Brixton, where I live (Peckham) is majority Black:

Black African – 35.67%
White British – 25.73%
Black Caribbean – 15.45%
Other White – 4.58%
Other Black – 3.58%
Chinese – 3.51%
Other Asian – 2.14%
White Irish – 1.93%
Mixed White-Black Caribbean – 1.86%
Bangladeshi – 1.25%
Other Mixed – 1.17%
Mixed White-Black African – 1.08%

It's less socially mixed than Brixton, my area of Peckham (north of the high street) is yet to attract much gentrification due to being far from the nearest Tube, so my neighbours are typically all working class and the majority of houses are still subdivided into flats interspersed with big council estates which seem to be mostly African residents.

I'm pretty sure since the 2001 census it's got even more 'African' around here... It's nicknamed 'Yorubatown' after the prevalent Nigerian dialect. There's certainly not much in the way of white working classes left, the young families tend to move out to suburban SE London and North Kent leaving behind their parents.

There's a great variety of housing... probably the most salubrious street near me is Glengall Road... these houses are about £3/4 million:



Contrasted with typical Inner London council estates like the Ledbury Estate at the top of my road:



I guess you can generally judge a London district by its high street, and Peckham high street / Rye lane are still un-gentrified. No Marks & Spencer, no Waitrose, no Costa / Starbucks or any other type of 'upmarket' coffee shop that I've seen... Just lots of ethnic food stores, shops selling weaves, nail salons, poundstores, mobile phone shops.

Interestingly the second you get to the bottom of Rye lane and hit the common, it's a different story and very gentrified / upmarket and Dulwich is bleeding into Peckham now.

When I occasionally commute into Victoria station using Peckham Rye station, I can see barely a single white face on the 10 minute walk there, then see 200 white faces waiting for the train on the platform (and barely a black face)... these are all commuters from the gentrified bit around the common.
 

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Journeyman
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Yes. Seattle's Belltown district (between the central business district and the Space Needle) is very mixed-income, and somewhat mixed-ethnicity.

Generally, we're a mix of new market-rate condos and apartments (four good waves since the late 80s), new low-income housing, a few mid-century low-income buildings, some condos from before the booms, old housing that's cheaper because it's older, and a scattering of office buildings.

We have a large low-income population. The non-profit low-income buildings are workforce housing in some cases, and post-street housing in other cases. The public buildings tend to be more welfare types.

Condo residents are less diverse, but there's been a big influx of Asians. My building, which opened in 2008 and finally sold out in early 2011 or so, is probably 40% Asian (Chinese primarily). That compares to 16% that NYT reported from the 2010 census for my portion of Belltown (the north part west of 3rd) with 196% Asian growth compared to 56% overall growth.
 

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Free Cake
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Yep, in fact arguably one of the most mixed in this city since much of the West End became too expensive for those of us with less fortunate backgrounds.

Dennistoun was originally planned as a genteel suburb of villas and terraced homes, a small part of which was built. After the developer died it quickly became obvious to the new, less adventurous owner that the profit in this part of town was to be made from working class tenements, hence the rest of the area was built in this fashion, and the area gained a reputation as a 'respectable' working community amidst the wider squalor of the East End.

Fast forward and the area has gained new recognition for its good quality flats and close proximity to the city centre, while still being cheap thanks to the classic East End reputation. Hence the area is a mix of elderly locals, working class families, professional couples, students, recent immigrants and wonderfully 'miscellaneous' types... artists, struggling bands, drug dealers, drug users, and an old grizzled man in a leather jacket who'll tell you some stories. The main roads accommodate a mix of corner shops, discount stores, greasy fast food outlets, hip cafés, a few art galleries and studios, Polish and African shops... as well as good old fashioned bakers, butchers, and purveyors of fresh vegetables and fruit, which by law ought to have been decimated by supermarket monopolization in provincial urban Britain.

It's popularity among a variety of people is really down to that handy mixture of 'cheap' and 'location'. There's no doubt that most of these people would be in the West End or City Centre if they could afford it, but alas circumstance has thrown us all together. :)
 

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ONE WORLD
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I guess you can generally judge a London district by its high street, and Peckham high street / Rye lane are still un-gentrified. No Marks & Spencer, no Waitrose, no Costa / Starbucks or any other type of 'upmarket' coffee shop that I've seen... Just lots of ethnic food stores, shops selling weaves, nail salons, poundstores, mobile phone shops.

Interestingly the second you get to the bottom of Rye lane and hit the common, it's a different story and very gentrified / upmarket and Dulwich is bleeding into Peckham now.

When I occasionally commute into Victoria station using Peckham Rye station, I can see barely a single white face on the 10 minute walk there, then see 200 white faces waiting for the train on the platform (and barely a black face)... these are all commuters from the gentrified bit around the common.
Woop I used to live off Queens Rd, squatted there in a luxury art deco conversion when I first moved into London (when I say 'squatted' I mean lived there in a three while my sister paid the rent for one). The road was a mix of boho middle class families, the luxury conversion, and poor rents and council houses in grand 150 year old properties, plus an addiction centre that looked like a mass of brickwork. I used to avoid Rye Lane at night though to be fair it does have the award winning library/ community centre where we used to do a whole load of stuff from the usual hire to stone sculpting (and Building of the Year), the big chain supermarkets, and the cheapest cinema almost anywhere. There's also a pop up bar/ art space on the big multi-storey carpark in summer where some of my Italian friends now live off. The high street may be dominated by Black shoppers and locals but a fair amount of other ethnicities stay in the flats around the lane and above the shops, mostly young twenty-somethings. My mates were just behind the train station in a 1990s? new build and renting.

Back in the early noughties the crime was pretty high, I remember the no. 36 passing those big yellow police signs calling for witnesses every few junctions, changing sporadically through the year, including some for the bus itself when the driver got angry at another driver, lost control and ended up ploughing into a bus queue, killing a kid in front of his mum (he claimed he was distracted by a wasp), another incident when a man had his eye pulled out by schoolkids in a fight on the top deck. One notorious nightclub saw in three fatal shootings over the years - the council and police repeatedly tried to close it down but the punters always stayed the same despite the change of owners. My mate went in with a regular, he said it was filled with the most beautiful, classiest women he'd ever seen, and got told to stop staring.

The thing with Peckham then it had a bad reputation as the highest crime in the city (along with Hackney), but had a real chip on its shoulder with New Cross. Both areas had one of the poorest Black populations in the city with poor schooling and low opportunities, but one had the highest crime, the other next door had the second lowest. There was also a big rift between the long standing Caribbean community and the new African arrivals who were flooding the place, another sore point being that the Africans fast became one of the top earning strata of society, and their kids the best performers in education - whilst the Caribbean men continued to suffer at the bottom and Caribbean women often bought up their children alone. The local private school was dominated by Africans, not Caribbeans. Things culminated in the symptomatic murder of Damilola Taylor by a school gang (newly arrived, studious African kids were often bullied across the board), and the two communities united considerably. Things have changed for all now and things have levelled out more.

The estates between Rye Lane and Queens Rd was where alot of the working class tower blocks survived, the whole notorious North Peckham Estate and surrounding area behind the Library was demolished after Damilola's murder and made into dense, mixed income lowrises, with varying success.

After a couple of years we moved to Honor Oak, on the other side of Peckham Common - a vision of leafiness, quietude and not much happening.
 

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Well all mexican cities are very mixed, you can have right next to a millionaire home a super poor house, right next to a mall, and a metro station, some apartment buildings, right next to a supermarket, a park and a highway in just 3 blocks.


And yes, my neighbourhood is very mixed, there is a 7-Eleven and 2 Oxxos 1block away from each other, a Blockbuster, several banks, a metro statios, a national buses station, a trolley station, 3 parks, a lot of houses (prices between (US$175,000 - US$850,000), an elementary school, 2 main avenues and a highway, a supermarket, a lot of restaurants at just 2 blocks around my street, some working class apartments of about $US100,000.

Ethnically, in Mexico we are all mestees, just a bit whiter or a bit more indigenous, so yes all neighbourhoods are mixed.









 

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perthistan
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In my city Perth, AUS, most neighbourhoods are very mixed as about 35% of the population are born overseas, this does not include ppl of a different ethnicity who were born in australia, so the % of racial diversity is even higher.
 

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My neighborhood in Metro Manila is getting diverse. Alot of Koreans have moved in and we are seeing a rising expat community mostly from The US, Western Europe or Australia.
 

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Socially mixed but not particularly ethnically mixed.

There are a few foreign or ethnic minority people dotted about, in my street and the few immediately around it I can think of a Thai woman a few doors down, one or two mixed white/black families, a guy from Madagascar, a French couple, an Irish woman, a mixed English/Italian family, a couple of British-Indian households and obviously there are others I'm not aware of as I don't know everybody in the neighbourhood but probably 90%+ are both British and white.

In terms of income/social groups there is a big spread from some quite wealthy people and upper middle-class households in nice big villas to social housing with low income families and pensioners.

Having checked, in the immediate neighbourhood within 400m / 0.25 miles of my house there are currently properties available to rent between £375 and £1250 per month while properties for sale at the moment in the same area range from £69,995 to £475,000. If you widen that to the wider neighbourhood within a 1600m / 1 mile radius the properties currently available range between £265 and £1350 per month to rent or £69,995 and £950,000 to buy.
 

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Socially mixed but not particularly ethnically mixed.
Usually a perfect combination. Social diversity of a neighborhood reduces social tensions and increases mutual understanding and respect between classes. That's what I think at least.
 

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I live Downtown, on the residential section of it. So I think it's pretty diverse, the most you can get of it. It's the heart of the city: retail, offices, banks, bars, restaurants and many people living on it. The density of 11,000 people/km² (around 50,000 people km² during the day) helps a lot.

That's how the area looks like (focusing on wooden houses, the ones left):

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...1xObb4f1stREh-Q_Q&cbp=12,203.75,,0,-0.14&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...rAPPwEEnZUvPRsAdA&cbp=12,251.75,,0,-0.83&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...=Ckj6Zi5I_wspnTRKaIz6tg&cbp=12,27.29,,0,-2.56

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...wZw06S6KEXWp4J4KeEwP5g&cbp=12,237.73,,0,-9.49

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...77uS76hT-dLtId6xg&cbp=12,319.91,,0,-1.45&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...eLIzgz3sor2Ol6Wvfw&cbp=12,303.49,,0,3.12&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...rohPNtBCp7JH5fbneyQ&cbp=12,342.8,,0,0.97&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...fECxfUPXB_95crCPDHg&cbp=12,32.76,,0,0.14&z=16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...=l7uUxXrKC1RmD9YKXgexwA&cbp=12,46.45,,0,-9.49

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...6OgDuCfcsQq6uPUwCqci2A&cbp=12,267.43,,0,-9.56

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...VWuiUJTVU93LEiy_r01Z9A&cbp=12,148.21,,0,-4.71

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...RHerRgVk_xXj2t2BSNhKBw&cbp=12,151.12,,0,-3.67

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...d=FPoYimiBBq5H44vlFTvbWw&cbp=12,139.54,,0,2.7

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...=NOcnducWF8GxRyxOEOGS2w&cbp=12,179.79,,0,4.16

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...d=7jRcvx9RVO0JB-rWBD2kMg&cbp=12,87.91,,0,1.66

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...=YeLHlQvUAPDsVizeN1m3NQ&cbp=12,226.92,,0,-7.9

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...oBnoVjZAcZeEM-XAztrGWA&cbp=12,321.68,,0,-3.19

http://maps.google.com.br/maps?hl=p...d=fDVoaOz4ZzABNyHyM1N7rg&cbp=12,95.38,,0,2.22


And some data:





CENTRO

Population --- 32.601

Age:
-14 --- 3.209 --- 9,84%
+70 --- 3.405 --- 10,44%

Ethnic makeup:
White --- 27.297 --- 83,73%
Asian --- 2.967 --- 9,10%
Mixed --- 1.894 --- 5,81%
Black --- 423 --- 1,30%

Men --- 14.137 --- 43,36%
Women --- 18.464 --- 56,64%

Average income --- R$ 2.240,74

Household income*:
0 - 1/2 SM --- 14 --- 0,10%
1/2 - 1 SM --- 370 --- 2,73%
1 - 2 SM --- 981 --- 7,25%
2 - 5 SM --- 3.369 --- 24,88%
5 - 10 SM --- 4.025 --- 29,73%
10 - 20 SM --- 2.849 --- 21,04%
+ 20 SM --- 1.407 --- 10,39%
*SM = month minimum wage, which was R$ 540.00 in 2010 (R$ 622.00 today)


^^
In terms of ethnic makeup, however, not a lot of diversity.

Amongst whites, the vast majority of them, are Italians, followed by Germans, Spanish, Portuguese, Lebanese, Polish, to mention the largest ancestry groups. One could argue the white community itself is diverse, but people have blended together, looking pretty much the same, forging a common identity by now.

The Japanese add a nice mix though. They are underestimated due the stupid "yellow" thing on the Census. 15% would be closer to the reality.
 

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on the road
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My current neighborhood has two basic well defined groups living in:

(a) young professional and some students attached to the university

(b) older couples, barely any young children seen around.

Group (a) is a bit transient as many are people in temporary contracts or doing Ph.Ds etc., but is highly internationalized. Group (b) is almost entirely Dutch.

Fortunately, we don't have any ethnic shop of those things. I dislike ethnic neighborhoods to the heart and wish them all "blended into mainstream demographics". As group (a) here has many foreign people, but no dominant nationality/area, it at least don't foster the "ghetto feeling" some other areas of the city have.
 

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My suburban Orlando neighborhood has upper-middle to lower-class income, homeowners and renters, highly-educated and those lacking highschool diplomas, people all over the political map and, off the top of my head:

Indian
Puerto Rican
Chinese
Congolese
Vietnamese
Guyanese
Colombian
Dominican
Venezuelan
Cuban
Irish
Algerian
Vietnamese
Haitian
Jamaican
 

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Oh No He Didn't
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Houston's neighborhoods are very ethnically mixed but for the most part they are (with a few exceptions) still pretty segregated regarding income levels as is the case in most of the US.

However it is pretty common to go from a very high end neighborhood to a very poor neighborhood in just a few blocks, and in some neighborhoods the houses themselves tend to be inhabited by middle class people while those residing in the apartments nearby within the same neighborhood might even be below the poverty level.
 
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