Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Knowing the US well and knowing the San Francisco Bay Area very, very well, I have a question based on my lack of knowledge of all the major metropolitan areas in the world:

Is there any metropolitan area in the world that completely surrounds a single body of water as large (or larger) than San Francisco Bay?

I'm including all the smaller bays (i.e. Richardson or San Paulo) that are arms of SF Bay.

In the US, I can't think of any body entirely in one metro area that comes close. Globally, I'm not sure.

Also, is there any metropolitan area in the world that is laid out as amphitheatre like as the SF Bay Area: a huge body of water in the middle with the hills and mountains rising like seats rising above a flat stage?

I find the Bay Area to be a unique type place in the sense that it thorughly combines a setting for man and for nature. Other metro areas have that mixture,too, but the Bay Area's scale (the mountains are in the back drop and don't always domnate) make it different to me. I don't know if others see it that way.
 

·
Just Relax
Joined
·
22,870 Posts
Not sure about the first question. I did however find Lisbon to have a similar topography to San Francisco. Other than the direct comparison arising from the similarities of the suspension bridges, both are based on slopes overlooking a body of water, although in the case of Lisbon its a river.
 

·
Journeyman
Joined
·
16,920 Posts
I sure hope not. While the SF area is dense by US standards, most of the world doesn't sprawl like we do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Well I don't have any statstics for your first question, but I guess the closest in the United States would be New York metro area (if you include both Upper and Lower New York Bay). Internationally, the one I can think of right now is Tokyo and Tokyo Bay, but I'm not sure how large it is.

For you second question, there are lots of cities overlooking water surrounded by mountains. I think Seattle would qualify, and Hong Kong is another famous example.
 

·
Mơמkƹ͛ƴ∆ґ&#4
Joined
·
5,767 Posts
Internationally, the one I can think of right now is Tokyo and Tokyo Bay, but I'm not sure how large it is.
Its pretty much surrounded by urbanization.


Also worth mentioning: Pearl River Delta. While not a single city, it is consistently urbanized all the way around.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,944 Posts
I would think of The New York area. This includes Long Island, parts of Connecticut and NJ.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
125,482 Posts
Manhattan is surrounded by water on 3 sides. The suburbs in Connecticut don't face the water as much. They're a bit more inland and develop around the rail lines. Pockets of exclusive rich people homes then dot the coastline.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
39,269 Posts
Halifax, Nova Scotia does but on a much smaller scale. Halifax-Bedford-Dartmouth wraps around Bedford Basin. Population is only 400,000 and the basin is smaller than San Francisco Bay.
 

·
BANGED
Joined
·
772 Posts
I always felt Seattle to be the little San Francisco. try looking up the map of Seattle Metro. you'll find a huge water mass: Lake Washington, Lake Union, Elliott Bay, Lake Sammamish, and the Greater Puget Sound.
 

·
~ Mysterious Entity ~
Joined
·
4,865 Posts
Halifax, Nova Scotia does but on a much smaller scale. Halifax-Bedford-Dartmouth wraps around Bedford Basin. Population is only 400,000 and the basin is smaller than San Francisco Bay.
Halifax is sort of similiar, but there is a gap on the northern-eastern part of Bedford basin that isn't urbanised
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top