SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After my first visit to Downtown Toledo a few weeks ago, the one thing that stood out to me was its amazing potential for a rebirth. I mean, there's the river, the historic architecture and not to mention the beautiful Fifth Third Ball Park situated in what appeared to be a trendy urban neighborhood. What's holding this city back?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
I agree with the amount of potential there. Friends and I checked out Toledo on a trip to Cedar Point a couple of years ago and were really surprised at the nice, tight urban setting the city has. If they could get some business momentum going, it could really take off.

Hoping so in any case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,687 Posts
All cities in the former rust belt are like that. They all have the greatest potential, yet for some reason people keep wanting to move south and survive on air conditioning 3/4 of the year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I believe most Great Lakes port cities are going through a reinvention process right now and will rise again only much slower than in the early 1900's. Is it possible that Toledo suffers from being geographically in between Detroit and Cleveland?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Toledo Story

ManageMich said:
After my first visit to Downtown Toledo a few weeks ago, the one thing that stood out to me was its amazing potential for a rebirth. I mean, there's the river, the historic architecture and not to mention the beautiful Fifth Third Ball Park situated in what appeared to be a trendy urban neighborhood. What's holding this city back?
Toledo has been hit hard with the recession since 2001; there's a lot of projects underway with a new Arena, Marina district with housing, boating, retail, new glass pavilion museum--its a smaller city with a slower development compared to larger cities that move faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Toledo Story #2

HowardL said:
I agree with the amount of potential there. Friends and I checked out Toledo on a trip to Cedar Point a couple of years ago and were really surprised at the nice, tight urban setting the city has. If they could get some business momentum going, it could really take off.

Hoping so in any case.
With a city's population of 310,000 and with suburbs around it with about 500,000 combined which is good since most cities' population is outnumbered with the number of people living in the suburbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Toledo Story #3

hudkina said:
All cities in the former rust belt are like that. They all have the greatest potential, yet for some reason people keep wanting to move south and survive on air conditioning 3/4 of the year.
True! Soon as winter or snowing starts in December--it's nice to look at...but once it keeps on until Feb. or March--it makes you want to flee to Florida.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Toledo Story #4

ManageMich said:
I believe most Great Lakes port cities are going through a reinvention process right now and will rise again only much slower than in the early 1900's. Is it possible that Toledo suffers from being geographically in between Detroit and Cleveland?
Toledo has one of the busiest freshwater port in the world--which ships grain, coal, ore, steel on the east bank of the Maumee River toward the lake as it ships through the St. Lawrence River. Toledo is a great location since two major highways in the nation runs through it (I-75 and I-80)---historically with Auto boom in Detroit and Steel boom in Cleveland took off as it made their cities huge in the late 1800s to early 1900s which is an advantage.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top