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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm sorry if there's already a thread on this. This thread is devoted to areas of a city or neighborhood that have seen drastic economic, social and/or population changes over time.

Some examples I can think of are currently low end or abandoned neighborhoods of Flint or Detroit that may have once been upper or middle class. Or on the other spectrum, there might be neighborhoods somewhere that are currently higher end that were at one time lower end or abandoned.

Please provide pictures if possible :)

(ps. I'm not trying to belittle or pick on Michigan. It's just an example I came up with)
 

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Boston had a small $16+ billion project which put all of I-93 under the entire city, opening up a bit of space downtown and on the South Boston Waterfront.
 

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Journeyman
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My portion of Seattle's Belltown district had converted from half parking lots to a small forest of 12-story condos. 14 so far, as well as a few lowrises. Unfortunately retail is required in every building, so it's too dispersed to allow a successful retail core, along with the fact that some key parcels are still undeveloped or underdeveloped.

Of course that's probably not what you're looking for.
 

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Miami. Mostly Brickell, Midtown, Dadeland, Downtown and South Beach. But I'm not sure if you're looking for areas that have grown drastically or fallen drastically. Regardless, here's Miami's growth:

Brickell:


Brickell Avenue:


Downtown, Brickell and Midtown:


Downtown and Brickell:


Sunny Isles Beach:


...and South Beach:


The complete Miami skyline:
 

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Try the neighborhood just East of Forest Lawn Cemetery in Detroit. Lost of empty lots. No Streetview yet, though. But you can tell there are plenty of houses gone.

In North St. Louis I would try the area North of Cass Ave. and East of Parnell St. (just looking at Maps), but there's no streetview yet. Also check out the area just West of the Pruitt-Igoe Housing project at Cass and N. Jefferson Ave.
http://builtstlouis.net/northside/map-overall.html It may not have been updated for a while though.

Also try East St. Louis.
http://builtstlouis.net/eaststlouis/intro.html

This site mostly shows the neglect, so it doesn't show as much of the good parts of St. Louis.

Other St. Louis links:
http://newoldnorth.blogspot.com/
http://builtstlouis.blogspot.com/
http://ecoabsence.blogspot.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies!

All of those are great responses. I hope the Big Dig will have some positive impacts. mhays, yeah I love seeing how Belltown is growing, especially from I5 South. Oh man, Miami is going nuts. Dubai anyone?

STL, I especially love those links. I find white flight and urban decay so interesting. It's also interesting how places like Seattle are having such a resurgence of urban living and gentrification.
 

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How many of those will actually be occupied in two years? Are looking at a forest of dead trees? :)
The buildings are actually filling up pretty well. That's not to say there's vacancy, but in two years, the occupancy rates will be high. Miami has always been popular and people continue to move here. Downtown and Brickell have become so popular that a lot of people are leaving the suburbs for the center. Plus, the public transit is great in that area. No car = saving money when you're in a recession.
 

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I'll bite - for Indianapolis its Fall Creek Place. It was a upper-middle class neighborhood in the earlier part of Indy's history (President Benjamin Harrison's home is less than 1 mile south) - it then decayed to the point it was known as Dodge City in the 80's & 90's for all the drive-by bullets you'd dodge living there.

Through a HUD grant, the city bought up abandoned homes & vacant lots and fixed up the streets & sidewalks. Then, the abandoned homes were either leveled or rehabbed, and the vacant lots sold to new homebuilders, with special financing in place to encourage development. Its been pretty successful, as they've added another phase to the original 3 phases.

Link to the homeowner's association page (has the only before/after pics I could find):
http://www.fallcreekplace.com/index.php?module=BlockHome&func=main&pid=6
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'll bite - for Indianapolis its Fall Creek Place. It was a upper-middle class neighborhood in the earlier part of Indy's history (President Benjamin Harrison's home is less than 1 mile south) - it then decayed to the point it was known as Dodge City in the 80's & 90's for all the drive-by bullets you'd dodge living there.

Through a HUD grant, the city bought up abandoned homes & vacant lots and fixed up the streets & sidewalks. Then, the abandoned homes were either leveled or rehabbed, and the vacant lots sold to new homebuilders, with special financing in place to encourage development. Its been pretty successful, as they've added another phase to the original 3 phases.

Link to the homeowner's association page (has the only before/after pics I could find):
http://www.fallcreekplace.com/index.php?module=BlockHome&func=main&pid=6
Awesome. Thanks for sharing that!!
 

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For me, I would say some of the areas around OSU. I can remember when they were much much worse then they are now. Actually, most of the neighborhoods along High Street have improved! But thats just my opinion.
 
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