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Dublin Port have released the Grafton Architects led masterplan for the old Odlums Flour Mills. To include Port Museum, conference centre, cafe, bakery, space for large market, theatre, sky deck and possible location for City of Dublin Museum. Will be linked to the city by a 'Portline' above the working port. Would be a fantastic addition to the city if realised. Dublin Port are really investing an awful lot in their integration efforts. Should start to see work on the new Tolka Estuary Greenway next month and they're about to start submitting planning for the Tolka-Liffey Link.

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its the odlums mill and silo in Dublin port which I believe was recently made a protected struture. its in the heart of industrial dublin port and the images came out today as pat of a pr announcement of the building of a cycle track on part of the port owned lands. these are just concept photos
 

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its the odlums mill and silo in Dublin port which I believe was recently made a protected struture. its in the heart of industrial dublin port and the images came out today as pat of a pr announcement of the building of a cycle track on part of the port owned lands. these are just concept photos
Thank you!
 

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I've been wondering for a while now if a tourist attraction was in the plans ever since they refurbished the Dublin Port Company Building. I really like the idea! Especially seeing that a lot effort is put into pedestrianizing the area and making it more cycle friendly.
It makes sense. A french friend of mine once told me about how she cycled along the Liffey all the way to the end in order to make it to the sea. At the time it was her way of exploring Dublin. She ended up feeling disappointed that the area she arrived at felt rather hostile.
I had a similar experience when I was visiting Edinburgh and walked from my accommodation along the Water of Leith all the way to the end. I had planned to find a place to drink a pint when I made it to the sea, but instead I had to take a bus back into the city center to do so.
Celebrating history and culture in a place that people will naturally be drawn to can only be a good thing.
 

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its the odlums mill and silo in Dublin port which I believe was recently made a protected struture. its in the heart of industrial dublin port and the images came out today as pat of a pr announcement of the building of a cycle track on part of the port owned lands. these are just concept photos
The idea looks a bit more beyond a concept in fairness.

No idea on funding etc.
 

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It's very cool but there's a lot of no-man's land left in that plan - I'd hoped that they'd be thinking about the next phase for the north docklands outside of the current SDZ - particularly along the east side of East Wall Rd. There's at least 3 hectares there which looks very under utilised on google maps.

I've never really explored Dublin port, anyone know about port operations in this area? On the maps it looks like just a small ferry terminal and some sparsely used car and truck parking. There must be a reason developers haven't been sniffing around here?

I think they should also consider including some non "cultural" uses around the Mills site - i.e. boring old apartments and offices - to balance out the focus on tourist/event destinations.
 

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There was talk years ago of a really snazzy cruise terminal outside 3Arena/ Exo at the East Gate Bridge. I assume we are unlikely to see anything like this, but would go towards your point in a big way Gjim.


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Is there any project statement available from that Dublin Port project released by Grafton Architects? I agree we need that area to be redeveloped but what I see overall looks very random and not much considered (like that rised walk for example). It needs serious strategy to make it alive and working.
 

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Is there any project statement available from that Dublin Port project released by Grafton Architects? I agree we need that area to be redeveloped but what I see overall looks very random and not much considered (like that rised walk for example). It needs serious strategy to make it alive and working.
You can read the Design Statement here: https://www.dublinport.ie/wp-conten...our-Mill-Masterplan-GraftonArchitects-DPC.pdf

But overall, the idea is that the walkway allows to create a connection between the port and the city. The walkway allows people to access the Flour Mill as a new cultural destination without intruding on the operation of the port and avoiding the health and safety issues of mixing heavy industrial and port activity with pedestrians and leisure/cultural activity.

They argue that the walkway is an attraction in upon itself as it offers the visual spectacular of the port activities to visitors, putting the large industrial and shipping infrastructure and processes on display as something to be appreciated and marveled at.

I also would personally say, Dublin Port has recently and for a while before been in the news and even in Government / Council planning documents as somewhere that could be moved out of the city so that the land can be redeveloped for housing and as a Docklands 2.0. Any efforts by the Port Company to expand operation are met with opposition and it is generally not seen as a positive or contributory part of the bay. Most Dubliners don't see the Port as a part of the culture and urban value in our city and as such, this seems to be a way for Dublin Port to place themselves within people's frame of vision and intermingle it more clearly within the cultural context of the city; to reframe its physical presence as an important part of the city's heritage rather than as a growing concern and barrier to the city's future. In short, Dublin Port's chief executive is strongly opposed to moving the port and this is perhaps a way for the Port Company to solidify their place in the city and try to soften pressure for it to move to Bremore etc.
 

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Its a nice idea and the ambition is impressive, however, its hard to see there being a big enough return from it to justify the huge expense. Would make sense to incorporate the cruise terminal there which would help generate footfall there and cruise passengers could then use the walkway to get to the Luas.

I think the walkway would be better if it ran to the square being the Point rather than the quays. Would be better to access it from the pedestrianised area than the busy quays with the Eastlink right beside. Also, most people will probably be getting down there by Luas.
 

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I wouldn't say they have no idea of what they want to achieve, it's just I'd imagine the logistics of building this kind of amenity beside such intense heavy industry is pretty new ground to cover and will change the design very significantly buy the time it actually advances toward more finalised and realistic design

Most of all these designs are very evocative and as Nigel described very well it helps us to imagine for the first time how the port, a place we as people who have no direct connection to it would ordinarily take no notice of at best or avoid at worst, might form a new position in our minds as a place that holds social value for local people and begin to appreciate it's presence in the city.
 

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Thanks for the link but it unfortunately is like I expected - they have no idea what they want to design and achieve. I can't see possible success in this project, but still agree the area need redevelopment and completely new strategy.
It might be hard to imagine the success of something that is quite far from our normal frame of vision of what we might expect of a cultural venue or a port, but I don't think that the project is completely void of successful precedent either though. Contemporary Copenhagen is a good example of an arts exhibition and creative space within the comparatively isolated industrial context of Refshaleøen. The Refshaleøen area as a whole has ultimately become an interesting layering of industrial with new creative startups, galleries, restaurants and street food markets such as Reffen. And right beside Refshaleøen, we have now also seen the completion of the Bjarke Ingels' new Waste-to-Energy Plant-come-Ski-Slope which is again mixing leisure into a very industrial landscape.

Van Nelle Factory in Rotterdam is also sort of similar with a lot of events and arts/creative startups located in a famous modernist factory building in the Spaanse Polder Industrial Estate.

Another example is also im Hafen Theatre in Hamburg
 

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I had a similar experience when I was visiting Edinburgh and walked from my accommodation along the Water of Leith all the way to the end. I had planned to find a place to drink a pint when I made it to the sea, but instead I had to take a bus back into the city center to do so.
Are you sure you went the right way? There's dozens of pubs and restaurants in Leith at the mouth of the river!
 

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Are you sure you went the right way? There's dozens of pubs and restaurants in Leith at the mouth of the river!
It's a couple years back and I remember being there with a some people I met along the way, who suggested we'd be better off somewhere else. So I imagine there might be nice pubs there, but I just didn't see them. It was a very spur of the moment journey so I really didn't look much into it (it was before I had a smartphone). Main point is, that people like to walk to the sea along whatever river they find, so it's always a good idea to develop the area near the mouth of the river. Much love to Edinburgh though, it's beautiful.
 

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Kind of sums up why we are where we are with regards to progress. This mill was built in 1920. The fact its on the protected structures list is nuts. There is very little architecual merit to it.

Great plans though. Unlikely to come to fruition due to the usual naysayers and nimbys whos fingers even extend to the grimey parts of the city. I regularly walk down this part of Dublin and between it and the South docks area they are industrial wastelands. The city needs this type of vision, would be great.
 
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