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Except Pheonix Park which already has a thread!

This thread is for other parks and news or pics or vids relating to them.

Parks are a big part of the city and there are quite a number of really nice parks in Dublin as we all know. Some secret parks too ;)



Let's kick off with a picture I saw on broadsheet.ie from St Stephen's Green in Dublin City Center.

"Think they own the place..."



https://twitter.com/NiamhNic/status/476777902319874048
 

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Iveagh Gardens would be the least-known and probably best kept secret of Dublin's main city parks. It's a great Victorian idyll behind the National Concert Hall

Here's a photo of the waterfall which is one of the main features;

 

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I like that a lot of people don't seem to know about the Iveagh gardens. It is a nice change from Stephen's green.
 

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I like that a lot of people don't seem to know about the Iveagh gardens. It is a nice change from Stephen's green.
Yep, I'm quite familiar with a lot of Dublin city centre and have visited and been in a lot of Dublin's landmarks and I've only rarely frequented the Gardens. I think the fact it's hemmed in by buildings on three sides and a wall on the other as opposed to the Georgian squares which are only defined by black railings contributes to their obscurity.
 

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From Dublin City Council:
Dublin City Council opens its first in a series of new city park cafes

Dublin City Council has announced the opening of an eagerly awaited addition to Harold’s Cross Park – a new tearooms operated by Noshington Café. The new café is part of Dublin City Council’s broader plan to provide tearooms in parks where there is a demand. The council also plans to open a new café in St. Patrick’s Park this autumn and in Herbert Park in spring 2015.

The Harold’s Cross Park café is sure to be a big draw to locals in the area and encourage even more people to visit the popular park on Harold’s Cross Road. It operates from the western end of the park, facing Mount Jerome Cemetery, and occupies a disused public toilet block which was originally constructed in 1943. It has now been imaginatively redesigned by Dublin City Council.

Cllr Mary Freehill, representing the Lord Mayor of Dublin, will officially open the café at 11.30am on Thursday 31st July. She says, “The new café is a great addition to the facilities in Harold’s Cross Park. As it is very conveniently located near the playground I am sure that it will be a big hit for parents and guardians of children in particular. I congratulate Dublin City Council on their creative reimagining of a disused building and wish Noshington Café every success in operating it.”

Noshington in Harold’s Cross Park will open from 10am-6pm, Monday to Sunday during the summer and 7.30am-4.30pm during the winter. It’s also sure to be a great addition to the growing choice of cafes and restaurants in Harold’s Cross.

Harold’s Cross Village Community & Business Association won the Cities category in last year’s IPB All Ireland Pride of Place competition.

Ends

For further information contact:


https://twitter.com/DubCityCouncil
www.facebook.com/DublinCityCouncil
www.noshington.ie
 

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I just happened to stop there for coffee this morning and didn't realise it was the grand opening. Very nice spot and worth a visit.
 

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I just happened to stop there for coffee this morning and didn't realise it was the grand opening. Very nice spot and worth a visit.
Cool, I'm working on some cafe designs for a Park here in Blackpool. If you could get any pictures of the new cafe, I would be really grateful :cheers:
 

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I had wondered what the work going on in St. Patrick’s Park was but the press release posted above gives me the answer. Pity they hadnt the cafe open at the start of the summer, the park attracts a lot of people when the weather is good.
 

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I had wondered what the work going on in St. Patrick’s Park was but the press release posted above gives me the answer. Pity they hadnt the cafe open at the start of the summer, the park attracts a lot of people when the weather is good.
Well there's all of August to go yet and we could still get a few more weeks of good weather! Great development all the same - tea is the elixir of life and the more places you can get it, the better!
 

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Excellent development, though it seems quite pricey.
€8 million plan for restoration of Mountjoy Square park

Olivia Kelly

Last Updated: Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 21:45



The children’s playground and buildings at Mountjoy square Dublin. Photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

Plans to remove a creche, community centre and sportsgrounds from the centre of Mountjoy square and restore the park to its original Georgian design have been published by Dublin City Council.

The council proposes to relocate the non-original facilities to other sites away from the historic square, reinstate the formal gardens and introduce tearooms and a bandstand at an indicative cost of up to €8.1 million.

Mountjoy Square was first laid out in 1790 and the railed park at its centre was opened to residents of the square in 1805. In 1830 those living in the surrounding neighbourhood were given access to the garden for one guinea per family per year.

It is the only “true” Georgian garden square in the city as it is the only one of the five Georgian squares to have four equal sides. It was designed as a “beautiful and refined garden” around a central circular lawn with formal planting and defined paths.

Privately owned

It remained privately owned until 1938 when it passed into the hands of Dublin Corporation. Most of the significant changes to the park date from this handover, with the addition of public toilets, a nursery and a community building. The central lawn was bisected with tennis courts screened by fencing.

Later changes were made in the late 1960s when a park works depot was built. The most recent intervention was about 10 years ago when a new playground was installed.

Today the park is in two distinct halves separated by a tall hedge. The western half remains as an open grass park, with the buildings and sports facilities concentrated in the eastern half. Two years ago Mountjoy Square was designated an Architectural Conservation Area (ACA) by the council, which in addition to preserving the historic buildings, seeks to protect the character of the area.

The conservation plan for the park, commissioned by the council and the Mountjoy Square Society and finalised in recent weeks, seeks to build on the ACA designation by reinstating the historic landscape to its original form and use.

Finest example

The park is “the centrepiece of one of the finest examples of Georgian urban design in the city” according to the report, but has fallen prey to “unsatisfactory” and “ill-informed” interventions. The buildings are generally in poor condition and nearing the end of their lifespan. “In the context of the restoration of the historic garden design, their removal is desirable.”

The park was intended for “passive” and “relatively sedate” enjoyment, and the plan aims to reinstate the original path network and central lawn, “for the appreciation of nature and the historic architecture of the square”, and introduce appropriate uses such a tearoom and a bandstand.

The redevelopment will be carried out in two stages: the western half will be restored first, with the eastern side to follow only after alternative community facilities are provided in the vicinity of “equal or higher quality”.

Costs outlined in the plan are indicative and would be subject to change, depending on the designs and specifications for the work. The restoration and reinstatement of the square is estimated at €4,670,000, while the relocation of the creche, community building, depot and sports courts could cost up to €3,450,000.

The timescale for the project will depend on council budgets, but the work is due to begin in the coming months with the restoration of the railings.

© 2014 irishtimes.com
 

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€4.67m is a crazy amount for demolishing a couple for basic buildings, putting down a new lawn and paths and installing new railings. They should be doing a lot more for that money. The soon to be empty DIT campus is the ideal place for the replacement creche and other community facilities and good quality residential accommodation also. I would not be surprised if it was allowed to lay empty and totally undermine any works to promote the square.
 

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Agree, I've actually been inside the facilities as part of a corporate social leadership thing where we helped painting the inside. The quality of the houses are dire and I really hope the kids will get some proper facilities. The park and surrounding area would be amazing if restored. It's just such a shame with so many of the buildings being turned into flats with no decent facilities...
 

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Council to turn €4.25m estate into park

Friday 12 December 2014 22.50

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council has completed the €4.25m purchase of Fernhill Estate in the foothills of the Dublin mountains.

Fernhill, which is famous for its gardens and set on 84 acres, dates from the 1720s. It is about 11km south of Dublin city centre on the Enniskerry Road between Sandyford and Stepaside.

The local authority now plans to create a new regional park to meet the recreational needs of local residents.

Plans for the redevelopment will be prepared over the coming months.

The gardens were initially laid out in the early 19th century and were enlarged and developed by their owners over the decades.

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown cathaoirleach Marie Baker said: "I warmly welcome the purchase. I view this as one of the last opportunities for the council to purchase a sizeable parcel of land that can be used for recreation purposes."

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/1212/666559-council-to-turn-4-25m-estate-into-park/
...
 

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Iveagh Gardens would be the least-known and probably best kept secret of Dublin's main city parks. It's a great Victorian idyll behind the National Concert Hall

Here's a photo of the waterfall which is one of the main features;

Those spiky cannon balls on the railings looks rather intimidating. They look like something out of a bad horror movie. :nuts:
 
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