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Yes. It's terrible. Everytime i see a picture of a person killed in these things i ask myself about who these people are, what are their names, and who their friends and family are. There's a story behind every face that's often more beautiful than anything that can be written or told. Maybe a sercret love that will never be fulfilled, or a dream that will never come true. I imagine each person as like myself, and i guess that makes death so very tragic.
 

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Most people seem to think it's more sad to see a child die than to see an adult die, but i think their dreadfully mistaken.

A child's death is tragic because of the potential future that awaited him or her. The death of an adult is tragic because of the storie and foot prints left behind that could have done so much more....
 

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Cliff said:
I didn't know how serious it was, 8.9 on the richter scale!
Biggest in the world for 40 years!
Over 7000 deaths!!!!
Affected 8 nations!!!!
I slept right through it and didnt even figure how serious it was until I read the papers this morning too. Woah.....this is bad!
 

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redstone said:
This is the first time I've heard tsunamis on such a large scale! :eek:

Sounds like a mini Day After Tomorrow, with those tsunamis...
It's happened before, but a long time ago. Somewhere in the 1900s, a volcano on an indonesian island erupted, sending up smoke that eventually travelled all the way to new york. Tremors could be felt from thailand, and the resulting tsunamis hit australia and parts of india..... wasn't an earthquake, but much the same thing....
 

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EyeToEye said:
It's happened before, but a long time ago. Somewhere in the 1900s, a volcano on an indonesian island erupted, sending up smoke that eventually travelled all the way to new york. Tremors could be felt from thailand, and the resulting tsunamis hit australia and parts of india..... wasn't an earthquake, but much the same thing....
Yup...
Krakatau of 1883, I think...
The sound was heard as far as India, I think...

The biggest eruption in history...
 

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And Europe and North America witnessed real blue moons when the ash covered the sky. Another large Tsunami was around Scandanavia, where a huge undersea landslide caused a huge Tsunami that wiped out many of the tribes that lived on the coast.
There is a potential catastrophic Tsunami that will happen in the Pacific Ocean, where a chunk of one of the Hawaian islands is already cracking and breaking off, once this huge piece of land splashes into the ocean, it'll cause a tsunami that will sweep across the ocean, as high as a few hundred metres(this one in Asia is just 10m), engulfing islands on the way, The Phillipine islands are our(Singapore) only hope of surviving this.

This one however, is more than enough to worry about, especially the aftershocks that most probably will follow. Btw, Aceh is the most badly hit, it is only that the Indonesian Gov. does not allow journalists to enter the area, and it is not documented at all, besides several poor quality images. Myanmar should be badly affected, but I guess BBC and CNN only focus on Phuket, Maldives, etc.
 

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It looks really catastrophic on the news........with seas of water literally washing out everything that it touches........:no:
 

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Business Times - 27 Dec 2004

S'pore ready to help with relief and rescue

(SINGAPORE) Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said yesterday he was shocked and saddened by the extent of the earthquake's destruction and the large number of casualties in the region.

He said that Singapore is ready to help with relief and rescue efforts and the government is considering the kind of assistance it could offer.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said that Singapore's overseas missions in Sri Lanka, India, Thailand and Bangladesh have been in touch with the local authorities and are rendering the necessary consular assistance to Singaporeans in the affected areas.

So far, relatives and friends of over a hundred Singaporeans in Phuket and its surrounding islands have contacted the MFA.

'We are working with the Thai authorities to assist them. We have also received reports of a number of Singaporeans in the affected areas of the Maldives, Sri Lanka and India, and MFA is in contact with the local authorities to assist them,' said the MFA.

The MFA reminded Singaporeans residing or travelling in the affected region to continue to monitor developments and to register with the nearest Singapore embassy or consulate.

They can also register through the MFA's website www.mfa.gov.sg/consular. Relatives or friends of Singaporeans who are in the affected areas can call the MFA duty office at telephone number 63320000 to register their contact details.

Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
 

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^
Yes it is.......:yes: Deeply sadden by the catatrophy......:no:

Some technical information about the quake:

WORLD'S BIGGEST QUAKE IN 40 YEARS

LONDON - The underwater quake, which the US Geological Survey put at magnitude 9.0, was the biggest since 1964, when a 9.2-magnitude temblor struck Alaska, also touching off tsunami waves. There were at least a half-dozen powerful aftershocks, one of magnitude 7.3.

Mr Enzo Boschi, the head of Italy's National Geophysics Institute, likened the quake's power to detonating a million atomic bombs the size of those dropped on Japan during World War II, and said the shaking was so powerful it even disturbed the Earth's rotation.

'All the planet is vibrating' from the quake, he told Italian state radio. Other scientists said it was too early to say whether the rotation was affected by the quake.

The earthquake occurred at a spot where the Indian Ocean plate is gradually being forced underneath Sumatra, which is part of the Eurasian plate, at about the speed at which a human fingernail grows, Mr David Booth, a seismologist at the British Geological Survey explained.

'This slipping doesn't occur smoothly,' he said. Rocks along the edge stick against one another and pent-up energy builds over hundreds of years.

It's 'almost like stretching an elastic band, and then when the strength of the rock isn't sufficient to withstand the stress, then all along the fault line the rocks will move,' he said.

Indonesia is well-known as a major quake centre, sitting along a series of fault lines dubbed the Ring of Fire. But scientists are unable to predict where and when quakes will strike with any precision.

The force of Sunday's earthquake shook unusually far afield, causing buildings to sway hundreds of kilometres from the epicentre, from Singapore to the city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand, and in Bangladesh. -- AP

ABOUT TSUNAMIS

A tsunami is not a single wave, but a series of travelling ocean waves generated by geological disturbances near or below the ocean floor. With nothing to stop them, these waves can race across the ocean like the crack of a bullwhip, gaining momentum over thousands of miles.

Most are triggered by large earthquakes but they can be caused by landslides, volcanoes and even meteor impacts.

The waves are generated when geologic forces displace sea water in the ocean basin. The bigger the earthquake, the more the Earth's crust shifts and the more seawater begins to move.

In a tsunami, waves typically radiate out in directions opposite from the seismic disturbance. In the case of the Sumatra quake, the seismic fault ran north to south beneath the ocean floor, while the tsunami waves shot out west and east.

Tsunamis are distinguished from normal coastal surf by their great length and speed. A single wave in a tsunami series might be 161km long and race across the ocean at 966kmh. When it approaches a coastline, the wave slows dramatically, but it also rises to great heights because the enormous volume of water piles up in shallow coastal bays. -- AP

CHAIN REACTION STARTED BENEATH INDIAN OCEAN

LONDON - The chain reaction that sent enormous, deadly tidal waves crashing into the coasts of Asia and Africa on Sunday started more than 10km beneath the ocean floor off the tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Geologic plates pressing against each other slipped violently, creating a bulge on the sea bottom that could be as high as 10m and hundreds of kilometres long, one scientist said.

'It's just like moving an enormous paddle at the bottom of the sea,' said Mr David Booth, a seismologist at the British Geological Survey. 'A big column of water has moved, we're talking about billions of tons. This is an enormous disturbance.'

As the waves moved across deep areas of the ocean in the early morning, they may have been almost undetectable on the surface, with swells of about a metre or less. But when they approached land the huge volumes of water were forced to the surface and the waves grew higher, swamping coastal communities and causing massive casualties.

Moving at about 800kmh, the waves took more than two hours to reach Sri Lanka, where the human toll has been horrific, and longer to spread to India and the east coast of Africa.

And because such tidal waves rarely occur in the Indian Ocean, there is no system in place to warn coastal communities they are about to be hit, such as exists in the Pacific, Mr Booth said.

An Australian scientist had suggested in September that an Indian Ocean warning system be set up, but it takes a year to create one. -- AP
 

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Krakatoa
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Krakatoa (Indonesian name: Krakatau) is a volcano on the Indonesian island of Rakata in the Sunda Strait. It has erupted repeatedly, massively and with disastrous consequences throughout recorded history, but the most well known of these events occurred on August 26, 1883.

Before its final catastrophic eruption Krakatoa had lain dormant until May 20, 1883, when it erupted. By August 11, three vents were regularly erupting on the volcano. During this time tides were unusually high, and phenonema such as windows suddenly shattering were commonplace. Ships at anchor were sometimes tied down with chains as a result.

The August 26 eruptions occurred at 5:30 am, 6:42 am, 8:20 am and 10:02 am local time. The lattermost was the loudest and most destructive one, and could be heard from locations in Australia 3500 km away (2200 miles), and even from 4800 km away (3000 miles), on the island of Rodrigues near Mauritius, caused by the upper atmosphere bouncing back the sound to the surface. It is believed that this explosion is the second loudest noise ever heard by modern humans (the loudest is believed to have been generated during the 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora, also in the Indonesian archipelago).

Although no one is known to have been killed as a result of the initial explosion, the tsunamis it generated had disastrous results, killing some 36,000 people (some sources say 36,417), and wiping out a number of settlements, including Telok Batong in Sumatra, and Sirik and Semarang in Java. An additional 1000 or so people died from the effects of volcanic fumes and ashes. Ships as far away as South Africa rocked as tsunamis hit them, and the bodies of victims were found floating in the ocean for weeks after the event. There are even numerous documented reports of groups of human skeletons floating across the Indian Ocean on rafts of volcanic pumice and washing up on the east coast of Africa up to a year after the eruption.
Krakatoa before and after the explosion
Krakatoa before and after the explosion

The 1883 eruption was amongst the most severe volcanic explosions in modern times (VEI of 6, equivalent to 200 megatons of TNT. In comparison, the biggest bomb known to be exploded Tsar Bomba is around 50 megatons). Concussive air waves from the explosions travelled seven times around the world, and the sky was darkened for days afterwards. The island of Rakata itself largely ceased to exist as over two thirds of its exposed land area was blown to dust, and its surrounding ocean floor was drastically altered. Two nearby islands, Verlaten and Lang, had their land masses increased. Volcanic ash continues to be a significant part of the geological composition of these islands.

The eruption produced exotic sunsets throughout the world for many months afterwards, as a result of sunlight reflected from suspended dust particles ejected by the volcano high into Earth's atmosphere. Interestingly, researchers in 2004 proposed the idea that the blood red sky painted as a background to Edvard Munch's famous 1893 painting The Scream accurately depicts the sky as it appeared in Norway after the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa.

It has been suggested that an eruption of Krakatoa may have been responsible for the global climate changes of 535-536. Additionally, in recent times, it has been argued that it was this eruption which created the islands of Verlaten and Lang (remnants of the original) and the beginnings of Rakata - all indicators of that early Krakatoa's caldera size, and not the long-believed eruption of c. 416, for which conclusive evidence does not exist.

Since the 1883 eruption, a new island volcano, called Anak Krakatau ("Child of Krakatoa"), has formed in the caldera. Of considerable interest to volcanologists, this has been the subject of extensive study since 1960. Additionally, it has also been studied as a case study of island biogeography and founder populations in an ecosystem being built from the ground up, virtually sterilized, certainly with no macroscopic life surviving the explosion. However, the island is still active, growing at the rate of five inches (12.7 cm) per week.

Krakatoa was the name of a short 1933 movie about the volcano which won the Academy Award for Best Short Subject, Novelty for its producer Joe Rock. This movie was also notable for overwhelming the sound systems of the cinemas of the time. In Australia, the distributors insisted on a power output of 10 watts RMS as a minimum for cinemas wishing to show the movie. This was then considered a large system, and forced many cinemas to upgrade.

The eruption is also the subject of a 1969 Hollywood film entitled Krakatoa, East of Java starring Maximilian Schell - the title however mistakenly referred Krakatau at East of Java, when actually Krakatau is actually at West of Java.

Krakatoa is also a location of Professor William Waterman Sherman's adventures in the book "The Twenty-One Balloons" which was written by William Pene du Bois and awarded the Newbery Medal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakatau
 

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Singapore gives $2m in medical supplies, aid to tsunami-hit nations

SINGAPORE : The Singapore Government has said it is giving half a million dollars to the Singapore Red Cross to help launch its appeal for public donations to send relief supplies to Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Thailand.

It will also send an SAF medical team to Indonesia within the next 48 hours, and is working with Indonesian authorities on how best to deploy the team.

Two personnel from MINDEF and SCDF will also go to the UN Disaster Assistance and Coordination (UNDAC) to help coordinate work in the affected countries.

The Government said the total amount of its contribution was expected to be approximately S$2 million.

The Foreign Ministry will also work closely with the Red Cross and relevant authorities in the affected countries to determine their respective needs.

Earlier on Monday, the Ministry despatched a special emergency consular team to Phuket, where about 450 Singaporeans are believed to be holidaying until Sunday's killer waves affected the region.

The team will assist Singaporeans stranded there or in the nearby resorts and islands.

Channel NewsAsia understands there has been unconfirmed reports of a few Singaporean fatalities.

The Ministry is verifying these reports and will render the necessary assistance to the families concerned.

The Ministry says its Duty Office Telephone No 6332-0000 will continue to be manned 24-hours to help concerned Singaporeans calling about relatives and friends who could be in the affected areas.

Besides the Singapore Embassy in Bangkok and Jakarta, High Commissions in Kuala Lumpur and New Delhi, Consulates in Chennai, Dhaka and Pekanbaru, and the Consulate General in Colombo are working closely with the local authorities to contact and assist Singaporeans in the affected areas.

Singaporeans staying or travelling within the region are reminded to register with the nearest Singapore embassy or consulate.
 

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Actual headline from a Brit newspaper:

"Over 4,000 British holidaymakers could be affected after flooding triggered by the earthquake."

Does anyone else feel utterly disgusted? Thousands of people die and the british media complains about ruined holidays.....
 
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