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More excitment ahead!!!
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EyeToEye said:
Actual headline from a Brit newspaper:

"Over 4,000 British holidaymakers could be affected after flooding triggered by the earthquake."

Does anyone else feel utterly disgusted? Thousands of people die and the british media complains about ruined holidays.....
Yeah and ppl use this as a cheap way to dismiss Singapore as an unsafe place.......:yes:
 

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Success and Happiness
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Dec 28, 2004
Man loses wife, daughter missing
But grief-stricken Singaporeans find ray of hope in little boy saved from death

By Tanya Fong
PHUKET - VINCENT MAK was inconsolable yesterday. He had just identified the body of his dead wife. His six-year-old daughter Mak Jean Lee is still missing.

Mr Mak, 38, was among a group of Singaporeans who had travelled to Phuket with their families. On Sunday, the men had just left on a snorkelling trip, leaving their wives and children onshore, when the waves hit.

Now four of them are missing.

Mr Mak's friend Desmond Heng, 40, told The Straits Times: 'We were about 20 minutes into the boat ride when the tsunami hit. We could not see the shore at all. And we were helpless in the boat.'

His 39-year-old wife, Madam Tan Cheo Tee, is still missing. Their two children are safe.

Also unaccounted for are 42-year-old Madam Ong Bee Ling and three-year-old Tricia Ng Jia En, daughter of Mrs Belinda Ng.

The surviving members of the group have been staking out the hospital in Phuket Town since Sunday, waiting for news of their loved ones.

They have posted photos of them at the hospital's main reception, which has been turned into a gallery of the missing.

But among the tragedy and grief, there have been some stories of hope.

Tan Wei En, three-year-old son of missing woman Madam Ong Bee Ling, was on Phi Phi island with his mother when the waves hit.

They had gone there to wait while his father, Mr Tony Tan, was on a snorkelling trip.

The little boy was among a group of survivors transported to Phuket on Sunday, when he was found by some Singaporeans at the island's Wachira Hospital, naked and crying and wrapped in brown blanket.

There were bruises on his body, possibly caused by debris carried in the waves.

Ms Agnes Tan Mei Thing, a Singaporean among the group that discovered the boy in hospital, said she was told a doctor had resuscitated the boy by pumping water out of his lungs.

Ms Tan travelled with Wei En to Bangkok, where he was admitted to the Bumrungrad Hospital. Mr Tan remained behind in Phuket to search for his wife.

Yesterday, Ms Tan said she had been watching over the little boy since he left Phuket.

'I'm feeling a little stoned now,' she told The Straits Times over the phone from Bangkok. 'I haven't slept all night.'

Wei En's grandparents were due to arrive in Bangkok last night.

Doctors said he will be kept in hospital for one to two days.


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Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings.
 

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Success and Happiness
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Dec 28, 2004
We failed to warn, admit govts
No early detection systems in place and they are too expensive, say Asian countries

JAKARTA - ASIAN officials conceded that they failed to issue broad public warnings immediately after the massive undersea earthquake in Indonesia, which could have saved countless lives from the subsequent giant waves that smashed into nine countries.

But governments insisted they did not know the true nature of the threat because there was no international system in place to track tidal waves in the Indian Ocean - an area where they are rare - and they cannot afford to buy sophisticated equipment to build one. And what warnings there were came too little, too late.

Indonesia villages closest to the temblor's epicentre were swamped within minutes, but elsewhere the waves radiated outwards, gathering speed and ferocity until they made landfall.

Waves began pummelling southern Thailand about one hour after the earthquake. After two hours, the torrents had travelled some 1,600km and slammed India and Sri Lanka. Malaysia, the Maldives, Myanmar, and Bangladesh were also hit. Eventually they struck Somalia in Africa.

Indonesian officials said they had no way to know that the earthquake had caused the earthquake-driven waves, or tsunamis, or how dangerous they might have been.

'Unfortunately, we have no equipment here that can warn about tsunamis,' said Mr Budi Waluyo, an official with Indonesia's Meteorology and Geophysics Agency. 'The instruments are very expensive and we don't have money.'

But Mr Thammasarote Smith, a former senior forecaster at Thailand's Meteorological Department, said governments could have done much more. 'It is true that an earthquake is unpredictable but a tsunami, which occurs after an earthquake, is predictable.'

Mr Kathawudhi Marlairojanasiri, the department's chief weather forecaster, said it had sent out warnings on Sunday about a possible undertow along the south-west coast of Thailand. But that was after the first waves hit.

Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak and India's Information Minister Dayanidhi Maran said their countries would consider establishing an warning system.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard and and Japanese officials said yesterday they would lend their expertise to help build it. But an Australian official said at least a year would be needed to set one up. -- AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, ASSOCIATED PRESS


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Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings.
 

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Dec 28, 2004
Help for S'poreans in affected areas
ABOUT 450 Singaporeans were holidaying in the Thai resort town of Phuket on Sunday when the tidal waves hit, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) said yesterday.

The Ministry, which was unable to confirm the number of Singaporeans in other affected areas and the number of casualties, said it has sent a team of officials to help Singaporeans in Phuket. They include First Secretary Chian Kuan Yew from the Singapore Embassy in Bangkok and Consular officer Chua Beng from MFA headquarters.

They have established their base at the Governor's Provincial House in Phuket and are working with the Thai authorities to contact and assist Singaporeans stranded in Phuket and the nearby resorts or islands.

The Ministry said Singapore's representatives in Bangkok, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, New Delhi, Chennai, Dhaka, Pekanbaru and Colombo are working with the local authorities to contact Singaporeans in the affected areas.

It advised Singaporeans living or travelling within the region to continue to monitor developments and to register with the nearest Singapore mission or through the Ministry's website www.mfa.gov.sg

Relatives and friends of Singaporeans who are in the affected areas can call the MFA Duty Office on 6332-0000 to register their contact details. \-- GLENYS SIM


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Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings.
 

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Success and Happiness
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Dec 28, 2004
Heartbreaking wails and tears...
Grieving kin across stricken region struggle to recover and bury bodies

CUDDALORE (INDIA) - IN A SCENE repeated across tsunami-hit Asia yesterday, weeping and red-eyed parents here buried more than 150 children in mass graves.

About half of the nearly 400 people who perished in Cuddalore in Tamil Nadu state were children, leaving the town of 100,000 people in stunned bereavement.

Relatives carried corpses into pits gouged out of the ground by excavators. Most of the children were buried as they were found - in their Sunday clothes without the luxury of a shroud.

One man, spotting the corpse of his eight-year-old son, collapsed on the ground, wailing.

In Aceh, Indonesia, volunteers laid bodies in rows under sarongs at makeshift morgues. Others were stacked in white fish crates.

'I am hoping there are still enough coffins available,' said Mr Mustofa, mayor of Aceh's Bireuen regency.

Throughout the region, distraught relatives hunted through piles of corpses for missing kin and prayed for the safe return of thousands still missing.

Residents of Karapitiya, about 3km north of the southern Sri Lankan port city of Galle, milled in the streets outside the town's hospital, shirts or handkerchiefs clutched over their noses against the overpowering stench of decaying bodies.

Corpses of hundreds who drowned lay bloated and disfigured throughout the lobby and corridors of the hospital. The bodies kept arriving at a makeshift morgue in a hospital car park, where distraught relatives and friends gathered to search for a familiar face - or a recognisable scrap of clothing.

Information was scarce on the fate of thousands of holidaying foreigners caught in walls of water that swept across the Indian Ocean, slamming into coastal areas of Thailand, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, India and the Maldives.

Calls from worried relatives around the world swamped hotlines set up by foreign ministries and tour operators. Communications were hampered by damaged and clogged phone lines.

In Japan, government agencies and groups issued differing figures on missing nationals.

A South Korean travel agency said nine people sent to Koh Phi Phi, an island in southern Thailand, were unaccounted for.

'We are being flooded with calls from families who have not heard from them,' said Mr Kim Jin-kook, head of public relations for Hana Tours.

For all too many in Phuket, the search also ended in heartbreak. An Australian man and then a woman broke down after identifying their partners. A Thai woman did the same. Staff tried to comfort an Australian teenager who had lost a friend. 'No,' he kept crying out.

'My husband is dead. Please help me. I don't know what to do,' said a German woman who cannot speak English or Thai, sitting on the grass.

'Most of these bodies (coming in) are divers,' said a health worker helping to unload bodies, some still wearing wetsuits, beside a stack of 50 hastily assembled coffins.

Beside those were half a dozen filled coffins with photos of those inside taped to the side. Hotel workers checked guest lists against names.

The government sent five air force C-130 transport planes to help in the airlift of the injured and dead bodies to Bangkok. One plane was packed with empty coffins. -- REUTERS, AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, ASSOCIATED PRESS


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Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings.
 

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Success and Happiness
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Just seen MFA's website...

They have a eRegister for Singaporeans who are travelling overseas to register their whereabouts and contact details with MFA. Not exactly sure how it works, but is definitely useful to have a consolidated list of Singaporeans abroad in times of trouble like this... Help is faster... gets accounted for dead or alive... Maybe, this should be made compulsory for Singaporeans travelling abroad?

http://www.mfa.gov.sg/internet/eregister/eregister.html
 

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Facts at a glance

Preliminary Earthquake Report
U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center
World Data Center for Seismology, Denver



The devastating megathrust earthquake of December 26, 2004, occurred on the interface of the India and Burma plates and was caused by the release of stresses that develop as the India plate subducts beneath the overriding Burma plate. The India plate begins its descent into the mantle at the Sunda trench, which lies to the west of the earthquake's epicenter. The trench is the surface expression of the plate interface between the Australia and India plates, situated to the southwest of the trench, and the Burma and Sunda plates, situated to the northeast.

In the region of the earthquake, the India plate moves toward the northeast at a rate of about 6 cm/year relative to the Burma plate. This results in oblique convergence at the Sunda trench. The oblique motion is partitioned into thrust-faulting, which occurs on the plate-interface and which involves slip directed perpendicular to the trench, and strike-slip faulting, which occurs several hundred kilometers to the east of the trench and involves slip directed parallel to the trench. The December 26 earthquake occurred as the result of thrust-faulting.

Preliminary locations of larger aftershocks following the megathrust earthquake show that approximately 1200 km of the plate boundary slipped as a result of the earthquake. By comparison with other large megathrust earthquakes, the width of the causative fault-rupture was likely over one-hundred km. From the size of the earthquake, it is likely that the average displacement on the fault plane was about fifteen meters. The sea floor overlying the thrust fault would have been uplifted by several meters as a result of the earthquake. The above estimates of fault-dimensions and displacement will be refined in the near future as the result of detailed analyses of the earthquake waves.

The world's largest recorded earthquakes have all been megathrust events, occurring where one tectonic plate subducts beneath another. These include:

the magnitude 9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, the magnitude 9.2 1964 Prince William Sound, Alaska, earthquake, the magnitude 9.1 1957 Andreanof Islands, Alaska, earthquake, and the magnitude 9.0 1952 Kamchatka earthquake. As with the recent event, megathrust earthquakes often generate large tsunamis that cause damage over a much wider area than is directly affected by ground shaking near the earthquake's rupture.

http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/neic_slav_ts.html
 

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28 December 2004

Deadly quake rattled Earth orbit, changed map of Asia: US geophysicist

LOS ANGELES : An earthquake that unleashed deadly tsunami waves on Asia was so powerful it made the Earth wobble on its axis and permanently altered the regional map, US geophysicists said Monday.

The 9.0-magnitude temblor that struck 250 kilometers (155 miles) southeast of Sumatra island Sunday may have moved small islands as much as 20 metres, according to one expert.

"That earthquake has changed the map," US Geological Survey expert Ken Hudnut told AFP.

"Based on seismic modeling, some of the smaller islands off the southwest coast of Sumatra may have moved to the southwest by about 20 metres. That is a lot of slip."

The northwestern tip of the Indonesian territory of Sumatra may also have shifted to the southwest by around 36 meters (120 feet), Hudnut said.

In addition, the energy released as the two sides of the undersea fault slipped against each other made the Earth wobble on its axis, Hudnut said.

"We can detect very slight motions of the Earth and I would expect that the Earth wobbled in its orbit when the earthquake occurred due the massive amount of energy exerted and the sudden shift in mass," Hudnut said.

Another USGS research geophysicist agreed that the Earth would have got a "little jog," and that the islands off Sumatra would have been moved by the quake.

However, Stuart Sipkin, of the USGS National Earthquake Information Center in Golden Colorado, said it was more likely that the islands off Sumatra had risen higher out of the sea than they had moved laterally.

"In in this case, the Indian plate dived below the Burma plate, causing uplift, so most of the motion to the islands would have been vertical, not horizontal."

The tsunamis unleashed by the fourth-biggest earthquake in a century have left at least 23,675 people dead in eight countries across Asia and as far as Somalia in East Africa.

The tsunamis wiped out entire coastal villages and pulled beach-goers out to sea.

The International Red Cross estimated that up to one million people have been displaced by the natural calamity. - AFP

Copyright © 2004 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved.
 

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rocks
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cool... my dad donated 200 bucks through red cross
very sad indeed....


Toll closing to 45000
COLOMBO : The biggest humanitarian relief operation ever mounted was underway Tuesday along Asia's devastated shores as the death toll from a massive earthquake and the tidal waves it unleashed was predicted to hit 45,000.

With the scale of the catastrophe still unfolding the confirmed death toll was approaching 25,000 in nine countries - but Indonesia warned that it alone could have suffered up to 20,000 more fatalities on top of its official figure of 4,725 deaths.



Indonesia's Vice President Yusuf Kalla, who is in charge of coordinating relief efforts, said he estimated that "21,000 to 25,000 people" had been killed.

The Indonesian toll keeps rising as contact is restored with devastated coastal areas.

The quake, the biggest in 40 years at 9.0 on the Richter scale, ruptured the Indian Ocean seabed off Indonesia's Sumatra island, sending huge waves of death thousands of kilometres to kill and destroy in countries around southern and southeast Asia and even in Africa.

More than one million people have been displaced in the disaster, the International Red Cross said, as hopes faded for many thousands more still missing and fears grew that disease could unleash more tragedy.

Horrific scenes of destruction met emergency teams as bodies piled up by the hour in Sri Lanka, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, the Maldives and Myanmar, while international aid agencies rushed food and clothing to hundreds of thousands left homeless.

As survivors were evacuated from stricken areas across Asia, the full horror of carnage wrought by the tidal waves emerged: babies torn from their parents' hands, children and the elderly hurled out to sea from their homes, entire villages swept away.

Hundreds of rescue ships, helicopters and planes were mobilised to evacuate tourists from wrecked resorts and airlift stricken victims to hospitals already overflowing with the injured and corpses.

UN disaster relief coordinator Jan Egeland told a press conference at UN headquarters in New York that relief operations would be the biggest ever as the destruction was not confined to one country or region.

"There are thousands of dead people, and there are tens of thousands of dead animals. The people should be buried and the animals should be destroyed and disposed of before they infect the drinking water. It's a massive operation."

"The cost of the devastation will be in the billions of dollars. It would probably be many billions of dollars," he said.

In Sri Lanka, where nearly 12,000 people were killed, the country is banking on 2,000 Indian medical workers and planeloads of other foreign relief to help it stave off disease from thousands of decomposing bodies.

Drinking water wells along the country's coastal regions were badly contaminated with sea water that left a massive trail of destruction on the island, government minister Susil Premajayantha said.

"We are asking mainly for medical supplies from our foreign friends," Premajayantha said. "We need things like water purification tablets and safe drinking water. We also need equipment to clean water wells."

Police along the hardest hit areas have begun mass burials of unidentified decomposed bodies as the government waived normal legal procedures to dispose of the thousands of bodies piling up at rural hospitals.

"We have about 375,000 families displaced," Agriculture Minister Anura Dissanayake said. "This means we have a serious challenge to ensure that diseases don't spread in place where we locate these refugees."

A spokeswoman for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies in Geneva said that there were one million people displaced in Sri Lanka alone and 29,000 more in Thailand.

Indonesia's Aceh province bore the brunt of the temblor, hit at point-blank range and then battered by a tsunami.

An AFP reporter among the first to reach the province's main city Banda Aceh, which has been in blackout since the quake struck, described a scene of death and ruin, with hundreds of bodies and pulverised buildings.

Bloodied corpses covered by plastic sheets lay rotting on the ground at an Indonesian Red Cross office in Lambaro on the northern outskirts of Banda Aceh.

Police said there were 500 bodies at the centre.

In southern India vultures gathered as survivors grimly buried or burnt their dead as the death toll rose to more than 6,800, with thousands more missing.

In the worst-hit Indian state Tamil Nadu, fisherman A. Ravi wept as he recalled watching his family, including four children, swept away as his village was flattened.

"We went fishing in the early morning and a few hours later the water started swirling around us and suddenly the level went down so sharply we could see the seabed," said Ravi.

"Then I saw a huge sheet of water going towards the shore...when I got back I found my village under water and my family gone," he said.

The Indian death toll included about 3,000 in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, close to the quake's epicentre where tens of thousands of people were still unaccounted for.

Thousands of people were fleeing the coasts of the islands after fresh tremors hit Monday and meteorologists warned aftershocks could trigger "big waves" until Tuesday afternoon.

In Thailand, more than 700 foreign tourists are believed to be among the total of 990 dead.

"The latest figure we have is more than 990 confirmed deaths. Of these some 200 were Thais and the rest were foreigners," Sutham Sangprathum told reporters before a cabinet meeting on the disaster.

"But from what I have witnessed more deaths will be reported."

Sutham estimated that the final death toll could surpass 2,000 in six southern provinces.

Almost 29,000 people were evacuated from the worst affected areas, which included the resort islands of Phuket and Phi Phi where thousands of European tourists had been enjoying holidays.

Hardly a building was left standing on Phi Phi island east of Phuket, where bodies were seen strewn about the island, covered in white cloths before being taken away by emergency crews or Western tourist volunteers.

"I saw bodies almost everywhere on land, and in the water too, and I think there are many more bodies trapped under the bungalow debris," said rescuer Wirat Mansa-ad, estimating 300 died on the island alone.

As Thailand mobilised its army and navy in a huge rescue operation, dazed foreigners began flying home - still struggling to come to grips with what had happened.

Just before the first wave struck, "there was no water left in the ocean.

The fish were just flapping and dying on the beach," Danish tourist Svend Falk-Roenne, 52, told AFP in Bangkok on his way home from Phuket.

"Then the wave just came towards us. I've never seen anything like it."

Melina Heppell, a six-month-old baby girl from Australia, was swept from her father's arms on Patong Beach, Phuket, when a tsunami wave hit, her uncle Simon Illingworth said on Australian television.

"They were walking along Patong Beach yesterday...he thought he had the baby in his hands, but all he had was clothes," Illingworth said, tears streaming down his cheeks.

The waves triggered by the quake were so powerful that the destruction reached the shores of Africa about 7,000 kilometres (4,000 miles) away, killing more than 100 Somali fishermen. - AFP
 

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27 December 2004

No tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean and affected countries
By Joanne Leow, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE : A tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean could have saved thousands of lives after the Sumatra earthquake.

But the system does not exist currently, because tsunamis are a rare occurrence in the region.

Usually caused by a massive earthquake under the sea, tsunamis are a series of travelling ocean waves which can wreak severe destruction on low lying coastal areas.

Assoc Prof Yong Lu, a Earthquake Engineering Expert from Nanyang Technological University said, "you have an earthquake which causes large movements of the seabed, so when you have the seabed moving up and down quickly then you create a huge body of massive tidal wave."

Because of the magnitude of the Sumatra earthquake, tsunamis travelling at almost 500 kilometres an hour hit many Asian coastal areas.

Waves reaching heights of 4 stories left a disaster zone unprecedented in its scale and reach.

"The tsunami is very severe this time mainly because the magnitude of the earthquake is rather severe, reported at 8.9-9.0 on the richter scale which is one of the highest in our recorded history, so therefore there is a huge amount of sea wave and it travelled very far away from the epicentre." said Dr Chew Soon Hoe, a tsunami expert from the National University of Singapore.

Singapore was not affected by the tsunamis because it is sheltered by neighbouring countries. However it is a member of an international coordination group for a tsunami warning system in the Pacific.

This network enables 26 countries in the Pacific Ocean to monitor and warn each other of potential tsunamis when an earthquake hits the region.

But there is no official alert system for the countries in the Indian Ocean or the Bay of Bengal where it could have saved thousands.

Extensive collaboration between countries in the region would be needed to make a warning system work.

Experts say an early alert system could warn people of an imminent tsunami up to a few hours before it hits land.

And even though the worst may be over - they warn coastal areas could still be dangerous, because of potential aftershocks. - CNA

Copyright © 2004 MCN International Pte Ltd
 

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By Spirit
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The 9.0-magnitude temblor that struck 250 kilometers (155 miles) southeast of Sumatra island Sunday may have moved small islands as much as 20 metres, according to one expert.
truly earth-shattering! :eek:
 

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Business Times - 28 Dec 2004

Chances of tsunami hitting S'pore remote

Island is sheltered from quake zones by land masses

By DANIEL BUENAS

(SINGAPORE) Most experts say it's extremely unlikely that Singapore could be hit by a tsunami caused by an earthquake, although some believe it's not impossible.

Associate Professor Lee Fook Hou, of the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering, said yesterday that whether a tsunami hits a particular place depends on 'obstacles' between that place and the epicentre of the waves. 'Singapore . . . is relatively sheltered from the known active earthquake locations - in this case mainly off the west coast of Sumatra - by land masses and narrow straits,' he said. 'So it is much less likely to experience the effects felt by, say, Phuket or Penang.' But Prof Lee said that while the chances of Singapore being hit are remote, it's not out of the question. 'In this kind of business, one can never say 'never',' he said. 'Singapore has been relatively lucky.'

Associate Professor Wong Poh Poh, of NUS's Department of Geography, said Singapore is 'very very safe'.

'The chances of being hit (by a tsunami) are virtually zero,' he said. 'We don't have earthquakes, although we might have earth tremors, and we have very little water space between land masses.'

Associate Professor Lu Yong, of Nanyang Technological University's Civil and Environmental Engineering Deparment, said that even if a tsunami were to reach Singapore, destruction would be mainly along the shore line, and most buildings would be untouched because they are far back. Prof Lu said an NTU study had shown that if a 'worst-case scenario' earthquake with a 9.0 magnitude on the Richter scale were to hit the closest fault line to Singapore - around 400 km away - there 'wouldn't be a lot of damage'.

'If this were to happen, there might be some stronger shaking, but it is not a problem for normal buildings,' he said. 'For some of the high-rise buildings built on soft soil layers, there might be more damage.'

When contacted, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) could not confirm if there are contingency plans for a tsunami. 'MHA's Homefront Crisis Management Centre has the responsibility of dealing with all major civil contingencies, including security-related contingencies or those caused by natural disasters,' MHA said in a statement. 'The government is also constantly reviewing its existing contingency plans to handle civil contingencies, to keep them up to date.'

Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
 

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deceased
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Attention all readers: Please turn away from the computer screen, pick up your phone, and dial 1900-911-1110 to donate 10sgd to the Singapore Red Cross in aid of the thousands of victims of the Asian Earthquake and resulting Tsunamis
 

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Success and Happiness
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I've done that through Red Cross (Option 3)

1) By cheque
Please address the cheque to "Singapore Red Cross Society" and indicate behind the cheque "Tidal Waves Asia". Include name, address and telephone number at the back of the cheque as a receipt will be sent to you.

Post the Cheque to:
Singapore Red Cross, Red Cross House, 15 Penang Lane, Singapore 238486

2) Donors may wish to come personally to make a donation (either by cash or by cheque) at the Red Cross House, 15 Penang Lane between 9.00am to 5.30pm on weekdays and from 9.30am to 12.30pm on Saturdays.

3) Donors may also make on-line donation at DBS website @ https://internet-banking.dbs.com.sg (This is the fastest method and can indicate the amount you want to donate. )
 

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More excitment ahead!!!
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EyeToEye said:
Attention all readers: Please turn away from the computer screen, pick up your phone, and dial 1900-911-1110 to donate 10sgd to the Singapore Red Cross in aid of the thousands of victims of the Asian Earthquake and resulting Tsunamis
Or 1900-911-1150 to donate 50sgd.....:yes:
 

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babystan03 said:
Business Times - 28 Dec 2004

Chances of tsunami hitting S'pore remote

Island is sheltered from quake zones by land masses

By DANIEL BUENAS

(SINGAPORE) Most experts say it's extremely unlikely that Singapore could be hit by a tsunami caused by an earthquake, although some believe it's not impossible.

Associate Professor Lee Fook Hou, of the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering, said yesterday that whether a tsunami hits a particular place depends on 'obstacles' between that place and the epicentre of the waves. 'Singapore . . . is relatively sheltered from the known active earthquake locations - in this case mainly off the west coast of Sumatra - by land masses and narrow straits,' he said. 'So it is much less likely to experience the effects felt by, say, Phuket or Penang.' But Prof Lee said that while the chances of Singapore being hit are remote, it's not out of the question. 'In this kind of business, one can never say 'never',' he said. 'Singapore has been relatively lucky.'

Associate Professor Wong Poh Poh, of NUS's Department of Geography, said Singapore is 'very very safe'.

'The chances of being hit (by a tsunami) are virtually zero,' he said. 'We don't have earthquakes, although we might have earth tremors, and we have very little water space between land masses.'

Associate Professor Lu Yong, of Nanyang Technological University's Civil and Environmental Engineering Deparment, said that even if a tsunami were to reach Singapore, destruction would be mainly along the shore line, and most buildings would be untouched because they are far back. Prof Lu said an NTU study had shown that if a 'worst-case scenario' earthquake with a 9.0 magnitude on the Richter scale were to hit the closest fault line to Singapore - around 400 km away - there 'wouldn't be a lot of damage'.

'If this were to happen, there might be some stronger shaking, but it is not a problem for normal buildings,' he said. 'For some of the high-rise buildings built on soft soil layers, there might be more damage.'

When contacted, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) could not confirm if there are contingency plans for a tsunami. 'MHA's Homefront Crisis Management Centre has the responsibility of dealing with all major civil contingencies, including security-related contingencies or those caused by natural disasters,' MHA said in a statement. 'The government is also constantly reviewing its existing contingency plans to handle civil contingencies, to keep them up to date.'

Copyright © 2004 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
Very interesting read....this is the question popping up in everyone's lips over here in Singapore, and they keep asking ME that qn bec I happen to be a geographer!
 

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By Spirit
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Lets just hope there are no strong earthquakes in Southern Sumatra..where the impact would be felt stronger and possibilities of tsunamis greater!
 

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Death count from various sources

CNN Int' - 33,000++
BBC Int' - 60,000++
ST - 55,000++
Streats - 39,000++
WikiPedia - 59,000++
WikiNews - 22,000++
Reuters UK - 63,000++
ABC Int' - 53,000++
FOX - 52,000++

source feeds correct as of 1020h GMT +8
 
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