SkyscraperCity banner

141 - 160 of 216 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Recovering from tsunamis

THE immediate priorities in responding to Sunday's tsunami disaster are clear: The missing have to be accounted for and resources have to be marshalled to help the millions who survived the disaster. Tents to house the homeless, food, medical supplies and sanitation equipment are urgently needed. Sewage systems in the affected areas have been destroyed and water supplies are now probably unfit for human consumption. Unless medical aid is made available quickly, and portable sanitation facilities provided, there is a serious risk of a public health disaster. At all costs, this must be prevented. Much, however, will remain to be done even after all this has been accomplished. Beyond the first aid, there is the task of helping the victim nations to recover, and that will include restoring the infrastructure that has been destroyed - the schools, clinics, roads, businesses and homes. As many as one million people may have lost their homes in Indonesia alone, and the number of homeless may be similarly high in Sri Lanka. Assistance will be required to help the victims rebuild their lives, for most of them live in developing countries. Developed countries have offered aid, as have international agencies, and it is to be hoped that such aid will remain forthcoming even after the immediate disaster relief is over. The Singapore Government has offered aid, and we urge all Singaporeans to open their hearts - and their wallets - to the victims of this natural disaster, the worst to hit the region in decades. Geography sheltered Singapore island from the tsunamis' devastation, but humanity links its people to the rest in the region.

In the long term, the region must develop an effective early-warning system to deal with tsunamis. One of the most poignant remarks heard in the past two days came from the director of the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who said his office tried to send out a warning soon after the earthquake off Sumatra's northern tip occurred, but they did not 'have contacts in our address book for anybody in that part of the world'. This cannot be allowed to happen again. An early-warning system is not prohibitively expensive, and constructing one would be more a matter of coordination than big bucks. Surely the region can cooperate to avoid disasters that, inevitably, do not recognise national boundaries.
 

·
More excitment ahead!!!
Joined
·
17,714 Posts
01 January 2005

PSA waives port charges for transportation of relief supplies
By Debra Soon, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE : PSA is donating S$100,000 to the Singapore Red Cross Society for the tsunami victims.

This is to support a drive by the Singapore Port Workers' Union (SPWU) and the Port Officers' Union, who have appealed to staff to raise funds.

In addition to cash, the port operator will waive all port handling charges incurred in its Singapore Terminals for the transportation of relief supplies bound for victims of tsunami-stricken countries.

Shipping lines that are transporting such cargo through the Port of Singapore, can contact PSA Singapore Terminals for the waiver of port handling charges. - CNA

Copyright © 2004 MCN International Pte Ltd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Dec 30, 2004
Where are the 299 S'poreans?

Officials warn that final Singapore death toll could rise much higher
By Joyce Teo and Chang Ai Lien


ONLY three Singaporeans have been confirmed dead so far from Sunday's tsunami disaster, but officials warned yesterday that the final toll could be much higher.

There are now 20 Singaporeans confirmed missing, and a further 279 who are still uncontactable four days after the tragedy.

'I think we have to be realistic,' Defence Minister Teo Chee Hean said yesterday. 'It is possible that some of those who are unaccounted for may end up on the missing list over the coming days and we have to be prepared for it.'

Most of the missing Singaporeans were in Phuket, Thailand, where desperate family members struggled through another wretched day of trying to locate their loved ones in hospitals and among the hundreds of dead.

Of those confirmed missing, 18 are in Phuket and two in Aceh.

Of those who are uncontactable, 183 were in the Phuket area, 29 in India, 27 in Malaysia, 14 in Sri Lanka, 12 in Bangladesh, seven in Myanmar and seven in Indonesia.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is verifying with local authorities in India media reports about the death of a 13-year-old girl in Tamil Nadu.

Across the 11 nations struck by Sunday's tragedy, the death toll reached 80,000 yesterday and an International Red Cross official warned that it could well top 100,000.

Indonesia has turned up the highest number of dead with 45,268 so far, amid fears that many thousand more perished in inaccessible areas of Sumatra where rescuers are heading to only now.

Sri Lanka's toll stood at 22,493 and India's at 10,850.

Against such numbers, Singapore's are tiny. Yet, if the worst happens, Singaporeans may find themselves facing one of their worst tragedies ever.

Yesterday, the Foreign Affairs Ministry said that to date it has contacted 722 Singaporeans in Phuket and helped those who wanted to return home. So far, 175 have done so.

A consulate team has been visiting hospitals, registration centres and liaising with local officials to locate those still on the uncontactable list.

But with each passing day, the task of finding those who remain on the list is set to become harder.

'In situations like these, it is possible that some people may never be found,' said an MFA spokesman.

Mr Teo said some people may be uncontactable because of communication difficulties, while others may even have returned home.

Anyone who is home from affected countries should contact the Foreign Affairs Ministry, he added.

Mr Teo was at Sembawang Air Base to send off two helicopters to Medan to assist with relief efforts in Indonesia.

World health experts have sounded the alert to a looming health crisis if rapidly-decaying bodies are not disposed of properly and supplies of clean water, medicines and food do not arrive fast enough.

In joining the worldwide help effort under way, Singapore is also arranging for potable water to be sent to the Maldives. Medical teams are waiting for the go-ahead to give aid in Sri Lanka.

Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng, who was at Paya Lebar Airbase to send off Singapore Civil Defence Force search and rescue contingents to Phuket and Aceh yesterday, said that Singapore was playing its part in the rescue and assistance efforts.

'Our officers will be there until they have done what they can, and they will do their best.'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Dec 30, 2004
Outpouring of donations comes from all quarters

By Yap Su-yin


THE quaint streets behind Tekka Mall spilled over with relief supplies yesterday as people from across Singapore dropped off hundreds of bags of clothes, blankets, canned food and medicine for tsunami victims.

A solo effort by Frico Express, a Sri Lankan freight-forwarding company at Dalhousie Lane, to collect aid supplies for victims in their home country gathered momentum in just two days, as shop-owners and staff from nearby shops, children and even tourists came forward to donate items.

Many stayed on to help sort, pack and load the donations onto lorries. By noon yesterday, Dalhousie Lane and Madras Street looked like a relief zone, with cartons of goods piled taller than the adult volunteers.

Traffic crawled to a snail's pace as vehicles stopped to drop off donations, and the police turned up to help direct traffic.

Amazed at the public's response were restaurant partners Nancy Leelavathi and Jeff Kummah who opened up their Madras Street restaurant Roots de Cafe as an alternative drop-off point for donations.

'Volunteers have poured in non-stop since we opened at 9am, and so have donations,' said Ms Nancy, 36.

Emergency supplies filled at least six containers, weighing over 5,000kg, flown by Sri Lankan Airlines to the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo yesterday.

Although the relief aid was meant only for Sri Lanka, there were so many clothes donated that the surplus was shared with the Indonesian Embassy.

'We're short of disposable syringes, gloves, medicated plaster and water purification tablets now, not clothes,' said Frico Express's country manager Ranga Edirisinghe, 29.

Apart from individuals, more companies have stepped forward to help. Some offered money. Others rallied staff to donate relief items.

Apart from cash, local textile and apparel manufacturer Ghim Li Group, whose manufacturing plant and staff in Sri Lanka were spared, donated some 5,000 pieces of clothing for men, women and children there.

Traditional Chinese medicine manufacturer Eu Yan Sang gave 2,000 cartons of 1.5-litre bottles of drinking water and 1,500 boxes of essence of chicken products to Mercy Relief for distribution to stricken areas.

Charity organisations have also activated fund-raising drives. The Medical Foundation is raising money to buy medical supplies, water purification tablets and drugs against infectious diseases. It will commit $25,000 worth of medical supplies and drugs for disaster relief efforts in Aceh, Indonesia.

The airline industry is also doing its bit. Singapore Airlines Cargo is helping relief aid from as far as Europe and the United States to reach affected areas. Singapore Airlines flew the first shipment of emergency supplies totalling 19 tonnes from Singapore, from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Red Cross here, to Thailand and Sri Lanka last night.

Tiger Airways plans to offer free seats to Singapore-based aid agencies to transport emergency aid teams and medical equipment to Phuket.


INSTANT RELIEF ZONE: Cartons of goods are piled taller than the adult volunteers on Dalhousie Lane, as a Sri Lankan freight-forwarding company's initiative to collect aid supplies for victims gathered momentum in just two days. -- LAU FOOK KONG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Dec 30, 2004
President Nathan sends condolences

PRESIDENT S R Nathan has sent letters of condolences to the heads of state of countries affected by the earthquake off the coast of Aceh, Indonesia, and the tsunamis that followed.

'In his letters, President Nathan expressed his sympathies to the families of the victims of the disaster and offered such means of assistance as is possible towards the relief and rescue efforts,' the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement yesterday.

The letters were sent to Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej and the Malaysian King, Tuanku Syed Sirajuddin Jamalulail.

President Nathan also sent the letters to Sri Lankan President Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, Indian President A P J Abdul Kalam, President of the Maldives Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, and Bangladeshi President Iajuddin Ahmed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
EyeToEye said:
Oh wow... this photo is very well taken....
Able to spot a mata in the picture? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
3,000 give to the Red Cross

More than $2 million raised from walk-in donors and firms by yesterday evening
By Theresa Tan


HOUSEKEEPER Tan Geok Huay, 51, whose son survived the killer waves in Thailand, broke down while waiting in line at Red Cross House to donate to those hit by the disaster.

'Even though my son called home on Monday to say he's safe, I still feel extremely sad because so many died,' said the mother of four.

She was among nearly 3,000 people who showed up yesterday with their cheques, piggy banks and offers of help.

By 6.30pm, the Singapore Red Cross had raised more than $2 million from the public and from corporations for the tsunami victims.

Madam Tan, whose 27-year-old son went to Krabi for rock-climbing, wanted to take the donation tin to work as it's 'bonus time' and people are generous, but was told that she couldn't.

So she put in her donation at Penang Lane.

Other donors also expressed shock and grief at the tragedy and said they wanted to help.

Said Ms Helen Tay, 55: 'I feel so helpless just sitting at home watching the news. So I have decided to come here to donate money and volunteer my services.'

Donors ranging from octogenarians to entire families filed in through the day, giving amounts which ranged from $2 to $50,000.

Walk-in donors gave more than $1 million while companies gave another $1 million.

The money will be used to buy and deliver emergency items such as medicine, first aid, food parcels, water and other relief supplies.

The sporting fraternity also got together yesterday to rally around the disaster victims.

Thirty-three national sports associations and the Singapore Sports Council hope to raise about $100,000 for the Red Cross.

The Red Cross is currently accepting only monetary contributions, and requests no donations in kind due to 'logistical considerations'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Dec 30, 2004

S'pore sending more aid to affected areas

Package will be 'several times' more than $2 million pledged earlier
By Karamjit Kaur and Chang Ai-Lien

SINGAPORE has upped its humanitarian assistance with eight helicopters, a navy ship, rescue and medical expertise and emergency supplies being dispatched to tsunami-devastated areas in Indonesia and Thailand.

In all, up to 700 personnel from the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) and the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) will be deployed to affected areas in Indonesia and Thailand.

The largest contingent will be aboard a Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) landing ship tank which sets sail tomorrow to assist in rescue and relief operations in remote and isolated areas in West Sumatra.

The total aid package will be 'several times' more than the $2 million pledged by the government on Tuesday, said Defence Minister Teo Chee Hean yesterday.

He met reporters at Sembawang Air Base before sending off the first two helicopters to Medan, in Indonesia.

Both he and Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng who was at Paya Lebar Air Base to send off 46 SCDF officers, mainly rescue experts - 23 to Aceh in Indonesia and 23 to Phuket - said the Singapore Government will continue to render whatever assistance it can to affected countries.

Mr Teo said: 'Ever since the earthquake and tsunamis took place, we have put our forces on standby to render assistance to our friends in this region.

'We have been in close contact with them to see what needs they have and we have been steadily deploying our assistance teams to assist our friends.'

For example, Singapore is sending the four helicopters to Medan - two left yesterday and another two will leave today - at the request of the Indonesian government, he said.

Another four helicopters will be heading to Phuket soon.

Mr Teo, who spoke to Indonesia's Defence Minister Juwono Sudarsono yesterday morning, said: 'They have a great need for helicopters to do search and rescue as well as for logistics support, personnel transfer and medical evacuation in the affected areas.'

Extending his condolences to those affected, Mr Wong said: 'In such a disaster, it is important that we help each other and governments cooperate, as people have done - locals helping foreigners.'

The two SCDF contingents, with three rescue dogs heading to Phuket, include veterans involved in earlier rescue missions overseas and this year's Nicoll Highway collapse.

But the challenges this time will be different, said SCDF Commissioner James Tan who was also at Paya Lebar Air Base yesterday: 'It's very different from a collapsed structure.

'There will also be muddy ground to contend with. This is the first time they are dealing with such a disaster.'

The plan is for the SAF and SCDF officers to remain in Indonesia and Thailand for about two weeks, but the actual length of their tour of duty will depend on the situation on the ground.

Added Mr Wong: 'Our officers will be there until they have done what they can, and they will do their best.'

HOW SINGAPORE IS HELPING

Indonesia

- The first consignment of relief and medical supplies, including tents and blankets, arrived in Indonesia on Tuesday, airlifted by the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF). Other consignments will follow.

- One SAF medical team of nine people left yesterday.

- Two SAF helicopters left yesterday and two more will leave today to assist in search and rescue efforts.

- One SAF Landing Ship Tank, with a team of engineers and a second medical team, will leave tomorrow.

- 23 Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) officers from the Disaster Assistance and Rescue Team (Dart) left yesterday.

Thailand

- A consignment of relief and medical supplies, including tents and blankets, was airlifted by Singapore Airlines (SIA) to Thailand yesterday.

- 23 SCDF officers from Dart left yesterday.

- Four SAF helicopters will leave soon to assist in search and rescue efforts.

Sri Lanka

- A consignment of relief and medical supplies, including tents and blankets, was airlifted by SIA to Sri Lanka yesterday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,968 Posts
7 S'poreans dead, 17 missing, 157 uncontactable in tsunami disaster: MFA

SINGAPORE: A Singaporean man previously reported as "missing" in Thailand has actually returned home safely, says the Foreign Affairs Ministry.

His family had said he had been swept away by the tidal waves in Phuket.

But the man was actually not in Phuket.

The status of Singaporeans in the areas affected by the tsunami is as follows: 7 dead, 17 missing, 157 uncontactable.

At its daily media briefing on Saturday, the MFA also said Singapore's rescue and medical teams in Thailand and Indonesia were making progress.

Working closely with local authorities, Singapore's military rescue teams have as requested by the Indonesia government, zeroed in on Meuloboh province in Aceh.

Helicopters airlifted medical supplies, equipment and medical personnel into Meuloboh.

The team also helped set up field hospitals in Meuloboh and Medan.

Relief efforts will intensify when the Landing Ship Tank (LST) arrives on Sunday.

Colonel Bernard Tan, a Singapore Defence Ministry spokesman, said: "When the LST, which is due to arrive at about midday tomorrow, the second medical team will be able to get ashore, and this would be most helpful because there're many many people there who need medical assistance services. Apart from that, we have engineering equipment on the LST comprising bulldozers and excavators. And these will be most helpful in opening up roads, creating access for more supplies, more aid. Other aid agencies could also use this."

The MFA says its consular offices are doing their best to help those who survived the tsunamis but who may have lost their documents and belongings and even anxious family members.

Andrew Tan, a MFA spokesman, said: "For families that go over to the affected areas, we have been helping them at the airport, making sure that they have the means to travel to these places that can be very far away. We even have officers to accompany them to affected areas. We've also given interpretation, counselling advice and there've been instances where our officers have gone beyond our call of duty to actually provide money and documents to people who need them most!" - CNA
 

·
Success and Happiness
Joined
·
6,696 Posts
This is also depressing...

SINGAPORE : The Land Rover Club, on the way to Krabi in Thailand to help victims of the tsunami disaster, suffered a loss themselves.

On Saturday morning, a member of the 30-car convoy lost control of his vehicle, crashed and died.

The accident happened along Malaysia's North-South Highway, near Alor Star.

The convoy was just 60 kilometres from the Thai border.

Fong Peng Khoon, who would have turned 46 on Monday, died after he apparently lost control of his vehicle along the highway.

Fong's sister told Channel NewsAsia that her brother is a divorcee with a 10-year-old son.

A member of the Land Rover Club who was travelling with the convoy, arrived at the scene some 2 to 3 minutes after the accident.

Indi Tulsi, Land Rover Club, said, "When I arrived there, Fong was already taken out of the vehicle. There were some professional nurses there who were trying to resuscitate him. And they did a very good job and he was starting to breathe on his own again. By then the ambulance arrived and they took him to Sungei Petani Hospital. But I understand he collapsed again on the journey.

"In the morning we started our journey at about 7.30 and the tragedy struck at about 8-8.15. We were just half an hour into our journey and this is not because of fatigue or anything like that." - CNA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
redstone said:
The highest tsunami is 524m high, speed 160km/h. :eek:

Hit Lituya Bay in Alaska on 9 July 1958.
Watched a documentary in CNA today. They said that the maximum height an earthquake generated tsunami would be around 10 metres or so, though it might be higher, but not to the extend to the 3 digits.

The tsunamis that are super high are called Mega Tsunamis. And they're formed mainly through massive landslides. The Alaskan one was featured in the documentary, and what happened was a massive piece of rock from a surrounding mountains, dropped straight into the coastal water. Creating waves and tsunamis 500+ metres in height. The waves smashed through the lower lying forests on the lands and mountains devastating everything. Luckily there wasn't people living there, only a few boats and 2 people managed to survive that by riding the waves somehow, to the top of the forests and dragged back down safely to the shore.

They also mentioned that a particular volcanic island in North Africa has it's entire west side weakened and might collapse in a few more eruptions. But each eruption takes a few decades and will not happen anytime soon. But if the island does collapse crashing into the sea, the resulting tsunami will be so powerful it'll travel the whole Atlantic Ocean in around 8 hours and will be probably be as high or higher than the Alaskan one, and crash down on North American coastal cities, destroying cities like New York. And then even the tallest skyscrapers will not be spared.

So you can pretty much imagine what a meteor around 2-3KM in width when dropped in the centre of the Pacific Ocean is able to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,842 Posts
Dec 30, 2004
SPH launches public appeal

SINGAPORE Press Holdings (SPH) yesterday launched a public appeal for funds and relief supplies to help victims of Sunday's devastating tsunami.

To spearhead its efforts, the mainboard-listed company will donate $200,000 to the Singapore Red Cross Society and use its headquarters as a collection point for donations.

From today till next Friday, between 9am and 6pm every day, people can drop off money and supplies such as canned food, over-the-counter drugs, clothing and blankets at News Centre, 1000 Toa Payoh North.

Said the company's chief executive officer, Mr Alan Chan: 'We want to help rally the Singapore community to take supplies as quickly as possible to the victims of this colossal tragedy.'

SPH will distribute funds and items received to the Singapore Red Cross and relief groups.

Meanwhile, a number of corporations gave generously to the Singapore Red Cross yesterday, with Singapore Airlines Group pledging $300,000. Hong Leong Foundation donated $200,000, OCBC Bank and its subsidiary Great Eastern Holdings will donate $250,000, Haw Par will give $100,000 and Canon Singapore $60,000.

Canon has also set aside a further $49,500 (US$30,000) for five key distributors in Indonesia, Maldives and Sri Lanka to give to organisations of their choice, to help relief efforts in those countries.

Petrol giant Shell will donate five cents for every litre of fuel sold at its stations island-wide from tomorrow to Jan 6, and expects to raise more than $400,000 this way.

Singapore Red Cross manager for international services Lim Theam Poh said: 'Response is overwhelming. It shows how compassionate and caring Singaporeans are.'

PLEDGES OF CONTRIBUTION

THE following is a list of contributions pledged by various countries and regions to help Asian states hit by Sunday's disaster:

Australia: Commits US$27 million (S$44 million) in aid.

China: Offers 21.6 million yuan (S$4.3 million) of aid to India, Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Maldives.

European Union: Ready to release up to 30 million euros (S$67 million) in aid.

Japan: Pledges some US$30 million.

Malaysia: Sends an aircraft and a helicopter with a team of four armed forces doctors to Indonesia; sends food, medicine and clothes for about 2,000 victims.

Singapore: Contributing some US$1.2 million to global relief effort; military medical teams and supplies to be sent to Indonesia's Sumatra Island and to Thailand.
South Korea: Sending US$2 million.

Taiwan: Pledges additional US$5 million.

United States: Pledges initial US$35 million.

Prominent figures also made donations to disaster relief efforts:

Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka Shing: One of Asia's richest men, he pitches in with HK$24 million (S$5 million).

Action star Jackie Chan: Donates

HK$500,000 to the United Nations Children's Fund.
Actor Andy Lau: Donates HK$200,000. -- REUTERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
 

·
Lurker
Joined
·
14,081 Posts
CW8 said:
Watched a documentary in CNA today. They said that the maximum height an earthquake generated tsunami would be around 10 metres or so, though it might be higher, but not to the extend to the 3 digits.

The tsunamis that are super high are called Mega Tsunamis. And they're formed mainly through massive landslides. The Alaskan one was featured in the documentary, and what happened was a massive piece of rock from a surrounding mountains, dropped straight into the coastal water. Creating waves and tsunamis 500+ metres in height. The waves smashed through the lower lying forests on the lands and mountains devastating everything. Luckily there wasn't people living there, only a few boats and 2 people managed to survive that by riding the waves somehow, to the top of the forests and dragged back down safely to the shore.

They also mentioned that a particular volcanic island in North Africa has it's entire west side weakened and might collapse in a few more eruptions. But each eruption takes a few decades and will not happen anytime soon. But if the island does collapse crashing into the sea, the resulting tsunami will be so powerful it'll travel the whole Atlantic Ocean in around 8 hours and will be probably be as high or higher than the Alaskan one, and crash down on North American coastal cities, destroying cities like New York. And then even the tallest skyscrapers will not be spared.

So you can pretty much imagine what a meteor around 2-3KM in width when dropped in the centre of the Pacific Ocean is able to do.
Theorectically, a landslide at the Canary Islands' west side could devestate the whole east coast of USA. :eek:
 

·
More excitment ahead!!!
Joined
·
17,714 Posts
01 January 2005

Over S$10m raised by Singapore Red Cross so far for tsunami victims
By Farah Abdul Rahim, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE : Over S$10 million has been raised so far by the Singapore Red Cross less than a week after its launch.

More than half came from individual donations, and the rest from corporate donors.

Meanwhile, Mercy Relief is sending two teams to Sri Lanka and Aceh.

The rain failed to prevent these donors from turning up personally at Red Cross House on Saturday.

They continued to come forward, even though it is a public holiday.

There were those who had special New Year wishes for those affected by the disaster.

One donor said, "(I) pray they will find strength in the midst of suffering and press on look ahead."

Another added, "We've been having too many calamities. I hope we will have a safe year ahead."

More than half of the donations raised so far comes from individual donors, ranging from children who bring in just a few cents to the single largest donation of half a million dollars by Creative founder Sim Wong Hoo.

Singapore's Police officers are also lending their hand to provide security, since large sums of money are being handled daily.

Meanwhile, the Sri Lankan High Commission repeated a call to Singaporeans on Saturday to stop donating clothes and items, but to give cash instead as it cannot cope with the load.

Johari Ibrahim is one of six volunteers heading to Galle, Sri Lanka with Mercy Relief, and got his vaccinations courtesy of fellow team member Dr Kevin Chan.

Satwant Singh, Board Member, Mercy Relief, said, "The two teams are there to verify and assess the situation there, and also look into the possibility of mounting future projects, especially in terms of medical and food relief."

Mercy Relief has been collecting donations for the Red Cross, so even though it is not listed by the tax authorities as one of the bodies to collect funds for tsunami victims, it is operating under the umbrella of the Singapore Red Cross. - CNA

Copyright © 2004 MCN International Pte Ltd
 
141 - 160 of 216 Posts
Top