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East India Dock
Blackwall
E14


EIA Scoping Report: Tower Hamlets PA/14/00799



Development Facts

Floors: 5 towers between 20 and 40 storeys

Location: Mulberry Place, London E14

Commercial space: 14,000m²

Homes: 2,300 units

Developer: EID Ltd



East India Dock now




Site Application boundary






Not to be confused with the East India Dock Road proposals.
 

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I saw an article about this yesterday here: Skyscrapernews.com

The scale of the project will see 5 towers of between 20 and 45 storeys built meaning the tallest building should top out at perhaps 135 metres making it roughly the same height as the under construction Quebec Building which is only a short walk away.

Simultaneously they have been working on a second option which would utilise recently passed legalisation that would see all the buildings but Mulberry House converted from their present office use to residential with 431 new homes created.
 

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  • Public consultation exhibition next week
  • Planning application for the autumn

From ConstructionEnquirer.com 8 Sept

London property investor Criterion Capital has set out plans to build the country’s largest private rental scheme in East London.

The proposals will see four office blocks cleared at the East India Dock Estate to make way for 1,500 new private rental homes in buildings of between 8 and 38 storeys.
From Criterion Capital website 6 Sept

Criterion Capital is set to launch a public consultation on proposals for one of the UK’s largest dedicated PRS scheme at its East India Dock Estate. The proposals will see the transformation of the existing 8-acre estate into a 1,500 unit residential scheme exclusively for the private rental market.

The proposals will see the East India Dock estate, currently comprising four office blocks, transformed to provide around 1,500 new homes in new buildings between 8 and 38 storeys. In addition to the 1,500 new homes for private rent, the scheme will provide new cafés, shops, a gym and new parkland, as well as space for small and start-up businesses.
 

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No, moved out years ago to that office block in the Royal Docks. My friend works at Pershing which is still there, but they are in the process of moving in the next year to Canary Wharf tower, making way for this. In the next few weeks there is a consultation going on in the building.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know a couple of people that for Tower Hamlets and are currently working in offices at East India Dock.

They say that there's a model of the scheme in their lobby.
 

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No, moved out years ago to that office block in the Royal Docks. My friend works at Pershing which is still there, but they are in the process of moving in the next year to Canary Wharf tower, making way for this. In the next few weeks there is a consultation going on in the building.
I think that is Newham you are thinking of - LB Tower Hamlets are still in these offices.

Be interesting where LBTH go - councils are a bit more footloose and can be the first into development sites.
 

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Most of the new London housing developments appear repetitiously humdrum and similar and are undoubtedly the London vernacular for the 21st century. Straightforward square/rectangular, unexciting and tedious blocks of identikit brick and/or reconstituted stone with projecting balconies. Hardly creative. The grey tower block in the background is particularly forbidding and void of any character or uplifting distinction. How can architects of today design such forgettable blocks (except perhaps copying other 'architects' from the cereal packet). They should look to Chicago for some inspiration. At least the London Island high rise buildings exhibit some variety in colour and their relationship to each other. It has a few other buildings that express some identity, such as providence, Baltimore and Lexicon but the majority of proposed future stock is just boring.
 

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I like the original offices better, some nice 80s granite facade blocks which were sensitively designed and haven't dated IMO (and are in keeping with the area's history) but the new scheme also looks decent and kind of European.

Wonder how much of the water will be covered up.
 

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yes, the latest thing seems to be to fill in remain traces of the docks... which is slightly depressing. the character of the area, what little there is, is just destroyed by development that anonymises the area further.
 

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Most of the new London housing developments appear repetitiously humdrum and similar and are undoubtedly the London vernacular for the 21st century. Straightforward square/rectangular, unexciting and tedious blocks of identikit brick and/or reconstituted stone with projecting balconies. Hardly creative. The grey tower block in the background is particularly forbidding and void of any character or uplifting distinction. How can architects of today design such forgettable blocks (except perhaps copying other 'architects' from the cereal packet). They should look to Chicago for some inspiration. At least the London Island high rise buildings exhibit some variety in colour and their relationship to each other. It has a few other buildings that express some identity, such as providence, Baltimore and Lexicon but the majority of proposed future stock is just boring.
The direction of design is being influenced from the top down.
 

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yes, the latest thing seems to be to fill in remain traces of the docks... which is slightly depressing. the character of the area, what little there is, is just destroyed by development that anonymises the area further.
I think they're leaving the remaining dock and just filling in the 80s decorative water features?

Which docks are being filled In? I know South dock and North dock are being eroded by crossrail et al but they will still be leaving large stretches of water. I haven't heard of any other docks being filled in since the 80s?
 

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An, I see. actually that makes sense given where the dock walls are. Hmmm, shame they're not keeping them then. These particular docks were probably the most important in the world, being with the east India company. empire and all that!
 

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I'm actually very angry to see that now. This race for foreign investor greed kills London's true heritage again. I love how London needs to keep evolving (it always did) and don't want it to be only for Londoners, but this destruction of every little part of its history which means something to us true Londoners is happening on one of the largest scales ever right now, and nobody seems to really notice or think of the long term impact on our history, because it's so commonplace.

BTW, also discovered the current buildings aren't even 80s - most completed in early 90s, (but obviously designed in the late 80s). Shame they're all being scoped for redevelopment already. This whole white collar quarter is also an important part of British history from the Docklands era.

The current buildings:
http://www.emporis.com/building/anchoragehouse-london-unitedkingdom

http://www.emporis.com/building/capstanhouse-london-unitedkingdom

http://www.emporis.com/building/mulberryplace-london-unitedkingdom (town hall)

the other (curved) block is Lighterman House.

Capstan House is my favourite design because I like how it pays homage to the historic warehouses of the area in its design.

This proposed development is just bland in comparison. It doesn't care for the history of the area or what it meant. They haven't attempted to build any kind of homage to the docks or industry that came before it, which is all too often the case with this current resi property boom. They just want the quick buck, but if they tried harder and incorporated some of the history (or even converted parts?), they could've created a properly des-res place instead of more identikit absentee investors flats.

Yeah, I know, rant over! ;)

Oh and PS EH really needs to change that 30 year rule to a 25 year rule to take into account the new speed of redevelopments. I hope we won't see the loss of One Canada Square et al in future.

It'll obviously get approval, but I don't believe for a minute any of these flats will be in reach of the average person, as usual.
 

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I personally find the current building offensive. They a form of architecture that turned it's back on the modern, on the idea of progress, and instead searched for the kitsch, the twee and the tacky in old forms of architecture, blended them together and affixed them onto the floorplates demanded by commerce. The style represents the worst of 1980s Thatcherite yuppiedom.

They also don't work as a neighbourhood. I remember walking from the DLR station there to a friend who my wife and I were staying with through them and feeling unsafe - no eyes on the street. While what is replacing them isn't great, at least it will provide community to the area.

The real crime in the area was the demolition of Brunswick Wharf power station, which looked like this:

 
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