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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As there is so much development in our universities, colleges and schools I thought it would be good to bring all the various activities together in one thread.

First up:
Fears for future of art school
Jun 29 2007
Ben Goldby


A renowned Birmingham art school could face eviction from its historic Victorian home after 122 years of teaching at the site.

Leading figures in the city's art community believe Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) will be pushed out of its Grade I listed Victorian base on Margaret Street.

Prof John Butler, head of the department of art at University of Central England (UCE) run site, says that rumours of a move were backed up when he saw the Margaret Street site being discussed as a future sale on a property website.

"We have got a new vice chancellor who wants to bring the faculty of arts together on three sites including a new one in Eastside," he said.

"That would mean getting rid of the major city centre sites to fund the new building over there. I am waiting for a period of consultation. They are trying to say that nothing has been decided, but I have been sent property webpages showing that the Margaret Street site will come on the market soon.


"We feel very strongly, and not for nostalgic reasons, that the city should have an art school in the centre. This is a flagship building for art education in the UK and operates as well now as it did when it was first built.


"No new build could ever match it as a resource for artists of the future."


Mary Martin, pro-vice chancellor of the university, said the move to Eastside was great news for the UCE and that rumours of Margaret Street being closed down without consultation had been exaggerated.


"The Eastside development is a big part of our future plans but no decision has been made about Margaret Street yet," she said.


"This is a ten year project and at the moment we are just looking at the feasibility of it. If we can move the majority of art-related students into Eastside that might mean we have a city centre building for other uses to the university or we might sell it.


"There is absolutely nothing on the website to say we will sell Margaret Street and rumours that we have decided to are unfounded. We are looking at selling a number of sites over the next five years but the sale of Margaret Street is not something that was taken into account for funding the Eastside project.


"This project is the most positive thing that has happened to our university for a long time."


Rumours of the sale were published on the propertyweek.com site and have prompted former students and planning experts to condemn any future plans to move the BIAD from its historic home.


Joe Holyoak, who was controversially sacked from Birmingham City Council's conservation and heritage panel last month, believes the possible relocation is bad for Birmingham.


He said: "It's a terribly regrettable and retrogressive step by the UCE and it says something about the way the university sees itself and its place in the city.


"A lot of people would say the process of doing and teaching fine art is not significantly different from the 1880s and the building is well suited to its purpose. Things do change and you need new technical processes and so on, but generally things like that can be added into the building.


"I think Associated Architects did a really good job of bringing it up to modern-day standards, so I'm not convinced it should be replaced."


Former BIAD student and BA member Mark Renn, said: "I obviously have a lot of fond memories of the Margaret Street site. It was a fantastic place to learn.


"This certainly isn't a move that bodes well for art in Birmingham and coming on the back of the BA grant being removed it is bad timing."


Concerns over the future of the site come just a week after The Birmingham Post revealed that council leaders have removed a £50,000 grant from Birmingham Artists Board (BA), in a move which the group claim will force at least 25 members to leave their Lee Bank studios.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And a reminder of the Aston Plans:

Heres a reminder of the plan for Aston Uni campus.




A committee report for the 5th July has gone online at:
http://80.86.36.120/vault/XDDocStor...eport Aston University Campus C0208707FUL.pdf

I don't think there is anything too exciting we don't know already in it.

Mixed use development of up to 66,672m2 (gross internal area) to include staff (4 x 1-bed tutor and 30 x 1-bed visitor) and student (413 cluster flats [269 x 5-bed, 144 x 7-bed]) residential apartments, student ancillary and amenity services, university management administration offices, retail within use classes A1 to A5 (shops, financial & professional services, restaurants & cafes, drinking establishments, hot food takeaways) (1600 sq.m G.I.A.), car parking (325 spaces), highways and infrastructure works and associated development

The proposals would therefore result in the demolition of buildings within the application site including: Stafford Tower, Vauxhall Court, King Edward VI House, Lawrence Tower, Old Cross, Bishop Ryder House, Gem House and Dalton Tower along with the existing allweather sports pitch. The nursery building fronting Jennens Road would also be demolished. The existing sports hall would be retained. 2117 student bedspaces would be lost.

A total of 1307 student bedspaces provided within Blocks A/B along with 8 tutor apartments. They would form the first phase of the development. Once completed, students from the existing buildings would be moved into these blocks to enable the demolition of the existing buildings and the construction of Blocks C and D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
and also:

Mason Hall
873 student bedsits in 6 crescent-shaped, contour-hugging buildings
Developer: University of Birmingham
Architects: Aedas Architects
Status: Under construction
Planning ref: C/00245/03/FUL



Westbourne Campus
8,000m² of new build acendemic space and 7,000m² of refurbished, reclad academic space including lecture theatres, offices, a library, 200 student bedsits and a nursery in total renewal of UCE's former Edgbaston Campus.
Developer: University of Central England
Architects: Associated Architects
Status: Under construction
Planning ref: S/01533/02/FUL



Birmingham Super Hospital
1,213 bed hospital to replace the existing QE, QE Psychiatric and Selly Oak Hospitals.
Developer: University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
Architects: Building Design Partnership
Status: Under construction
Planning ref:



Muirhead Tower
Reclad, refurbishment and podium rebuild of Sir Philip Dowson's 16 storey 1971 block to provide 12,000m² University Schools of Social Sciences and Humanities.
Developer: University of Birmingham
Architects: Associated Architects
Status: Under construction
Planning ref:



University Science Park, Pebble Mill
36,000m² of research and industrial space for specialist biomedical sciences on site of former BBC Midlands headquarters.Developer: Calthorpe Estates/Advantage West Midlands/University of Birmingham/Birmingham City Council
Architects: David Lock Associates (Masterplanners)
Status: Approved in Outline
Planning ref: S/00992/03/OUT
 

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It's Sting. So What?
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The council is planning to rebuild or refurbish all 76 secondary schools and 6 secondary special schools over the next 10 years.
 

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Change is Here!
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UK's biggest provider of private IT training is based in the West Midlands too.

Computeach are based on Jews Lane in Dudley. Very good they are too!
 

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From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Wed 6/27/2007 11:37 AM
To: F04027160
Subject: UCE Name Consultation

Dear Simon,


I am writing to consult you on the University's proposal to change our
name later this year.

Our experience of operating under our formal title of University of
Central England in Birmingham indicates that it is too long and unwieldy
to enable us to easily present both the University and its location in
Birmingham to the outside world. We believe that this disadvantages us
when engaging with prospective students (particularly in the national
and international markets) and with business partners and similarly
disadvantages our graduates upon completion of their studies. Our core
partners in the region have already indicated that they would welcome
the change.

Our preference, therefore, is to adopt a new title which is shorter and
puts our location in Birmingham at the forefront, representing the
social and economic dimensions of the University's mission and
supporting the City of Birmingham's own profile as a science city and
university city within a knowledge-based economy. We believe that this
will strengthen the value of our students' degrees and diplomas after
they graduate.

We are conscious that some students have expressed concerns about the
possible costs associated with changing our name. Let me assure you that
we are already planning ahead in order to keep expenditure to the
minimum and that the cost will be a fraction of one per cent of the
University's total budget for 2007/08 and considerably less than the new
Olympic logo!

The titles for which we would welcome your support and on which your
comments would be most welcome are:

Birmingham City University
Birmingham Chamberlain University
Birmingham Metropolitan University

We are consulting widely on this matter and your views will be
invaluable in enabling us to reach a decision and then apply to the
Privy Council for a change in the University name later this year.

I should be grateful to know whether you have any preferences among the
above names and if you have any objections.

We have created a special web-based survey to enable you to notify us of
your preferences, which can be accessed at
xxxxxxxx. The site will be available
until 19 July.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours sincerely


Professor David Tidmarsh
Vice-Chancellor
Looks like it has gone down to three possible names.





Let me assure you that
we are already planning ahead in order to keep expenditure to the
minimum and that the cost will be a fraction of one per cent of the
University's total budget for 2007/08 and considerably less than the new
Olympic logo!
Yeah, ok. You told us before it will cost over £2m to change the UCE name.
 

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As there is so much development in our universities, colleges and schools I thought it would be good to bring all the various activities together in one thread.

First up:
Fears for future of art school
Jun 29 2007
Ben Goldby


A renowned Birmingham art school could face eviction from its historic Victorian home after 122 years of teaching at the site.

Leading figures in the city's art community believe Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) will be pushed out of its Grade I listed Victorian base on Margaret Street.

Prof John Butler, head of the department of art at University of Central England (UCE) run site, says that rumours of a move were backed up when he saw the Margaret Street site being discussed as a future sale on a property website.

"We have got a new vice chancellor who wants to bring the faculty of arts together on three sites including a new one in Eastside," he said.

"That would mean getting rid of the major city centre sites to fund the new building over there. I am waiting for a period of consultation. They are trying to say that nothing has been decided, but I have been sent property webpages showing that the Margaret Street site will come on the market soon.


"We feel very strongly, and not for nostalgic reasons, that the city should have an art school in the centre. This is a flagship building for art education in the UK and operates as well now as it did when it was first built.


"No new build could ever match it as a resource for artists of the future."


Mary Martin, pro-vice chancellor of the university, said the move to Eastside was great news for the UCE and that rumours of Margaret Street being closed down without consultation had been exaggerated.


"The Eastside development is a big part of our future plans but no decision has been made about Margaret Street yet," she said.


"This is a ten year project and at the moment we are just looking at the feasibility of it. If we can move the majority of art-related students into Eastside that might mean we have a city centre building for other uses to the university or we might sell it.


"There is absolutely nothing on the website to say we will sell Margaret Street and rumours that we have decided to are unfounded. We are looking at selling a number of sites over the next five years but the sale of Margaret Street is not something that was taken into account for funding the Eastside project.


"This project is the most positive thing that has happened to our university for a long time."


Rumours of the sale were published on the propertyweek.com site and have prompted former students and planning experts to condemn any future plans to move the BIAD from its historic home.


Joe Holyoak, who was controversially sacked from Birmingham City Council's conservation and heritage panel last month, believes the possible relocation is bad for Birmingham.


He said: "It's a terribly regrettable and retrogressive step by the UCE and it says something about the way the university sees itself and its place in the city.


"A lot of people would say the process of doing and teaching fine art is not significantly different from the 1880s and the building is well suited to its purpose. Things do change and you need new technical processes and so on, but generally things like that can be added into the building.


"I think Associated Architects did a really good job of bringing it up to modern-day standards, so I'm not convinced it should be replaced."


Former BIAD student and BA member Mark Renn, said: "I obviously have a lot of fond memories of the Margaret Street site. It was a fantastic place to learn.


"This certainly isn't a move that bodes well for art in Birmingham and coming on the back of the BA grant being removed it is bad timing."


Concerns over the future of the site come just a week after The Birmingham Post revealed that council leaders have removed a £50,000 grant from Birmingham Artists Board (BA), in a move which the group claim will force at least 25 members to leave their Lee Bank studios.
god those fine artists are such snobs, they would benefit greatly from sharing a campus with Vis Com, Fashion and the Conservatoire.....Margaret Street has a reputation for being insular and the above just proves it. The clash of cultures IMO would be great for BIAD and especially great for the inbreds at Margaret Street, plus the city would have a ready made art gallery if they vacate

as for Birmingham Artists.....they are virtually a closed shop and do virtually nothing for younger artists, I guess the council finally realised they don't offer value for money and don't offer the city's art scene anything exciting.
 

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Art degrees are not real degrees. I'm saying that knowing a lot of fine art students at Margaret Street. :D Same goes for acting degrees.

I'm trying to find out what will be going on at Eastside in regards to UCE. Hopefully I will be on the faculty board for Eastside next year so I'll find out more then. The C.E's of UCE are not will ing to speak to anyone about the future of the university, which is sad.
 

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Art degrees are not real degrees. I'm saying that knowing a lot of fine art students at Margaret Street. :D Same goes for acting degrees.

I'm trying to find out what will be going on at Eastside in regards to UCE. Hopefully I will be on the faculty board for Eastside next year so I'll find out more then. The C.E's of UCE are not will ing to speak to anyone about the future of the university, which is sad.
Cheeky :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cheeky :lol:
Too **** right.
What is your degree Simon. I suppose you are biased to the pure sciences and few other disciplines with everything else being not degree worthy.

Also, how does UCE justify Birmingham Chamberlain University in their name. Bit cheeky really as university of Birmingham was his baby and he helped to establish it. I could understand the high regard for Chamberlain but that is pushing it a bit far.
I like city or metropolitan, much like London and Manchester and also for helping to locate UCE.
 

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ye i decided not to do an art degree because i can't see the point of doing it, i can paint already lol and not intrested in sculpturing, 3d etc.

instead use the art skills i got and use it in an architecture degree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Planning committee report for 12 July on 12 Gosta Green,Aston,Birmingham - The Art Centre Refurbishment and part demolition of portico building with two storey (& semi basement level) new build to be used for research, educational and clinical purposes,including service area and means of access

http://80.86.36.120/vault/XDDocStore_7/0221498_Committee Report 12 Gosta Green C0194407FUL.pdf

Proposal
It is proposed to convert the remaining 1920's frontage remnant of a former cinema building and erect a two-storey extension to it to the rear to provide a new Academy of Integrative Health Sciences for Aston University.
The new building would accommodate four main research groups investigating the collaborations between science, engineering and life sciences, based around the following areas:
1. Tissue Engineering.
2. Research on the eye and contact lenses using modelling for the development of new
drugs.
3. Silicone modelling and protein production.
4. Computer skills. The development of paediatric and foetal MEG services.


The new building incorporates the conversion of the existing 1920's portico building. The building façade would be retained and returned to its original proportions through the removal of modern, unsympathetic upper floor side wing extensions and the reinstatement of the original ground floor window openings. The roof of each of the two side wings would be used to provide a terrace with structural glass balustrade. A new glass main entrance screen is proposed with a pair of glass doors.

New steps and a ramp with glass balustrade are proposed to the buildings main entrance. To the rear of the retained portico façade, a glass sided link extension is proposed to the recessed, new two-storey building. A glass curtain wall slot would provide a clear delineation between the 1920's building and the new main Academy building.
The building is conceived as a two-storey box. It would have a ground floor red brick plinth with first floor vertically proportioned glazed elevations. The ground floor side elevation would include a glazed cantilevered box projection through the brick wall. This would provide a picture window to the existing adjoining landscaped space, which would be enhanced with a new scheme of landscaping.


I didn't know it was an old cinema. Very funky. Should be a good example of potential for Curzon Street, though can't say I was enamoured by the first proposal although seen a lot worse *cough orion*.
 

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Also, how does UCE justify Birmingham Chamberlain University in their name. Bit cheeky really as university of Birmingham was his baby and he helped to establish it. I could understand the high regard for Chamberlain but that is pushing it a bit far.
I like city or metropolitan, much like London and Manchester and also for helping to locate UCE.
I was thinking the same thing about Chamberlain. What ties does the UCE have with Chamberlain (other than being located Birmingham)?
I don't like "Birmingham City University". Sounds like a college at St Andrews that's trying to promote itself as a university. Nothing against BCFC, it's just not an image I'd like to have in mind when thinking of a university.
I like the metropolitan name. In my mind the word metropolitan sparks positive images of a bustling, active city. That must be good for attracting new students.
 

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Thats really good news. I like Warwick.

The student union president managed to get the university to rebuild the students union too so all good for Warwick, their students and the wider region.

bonza :)
I've got a postgrad degree from Warwick, so I like it as well! I also visit the arts centre there quite a lot, so I hope that sees some expansion as well.

Excellent for Coventry & Warwickshire - a lot of high tech firms start on the science park and end up staying in the region and in some cases, expanding.
 

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I might end up at Warwick next year as it's my insurance choice, I love it, and I've played in the Arts Centre a fair few times as well, and that's great. Just hope the whole place isn't a building site the whole time I'm there :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
courtessy of Molly but to go with rest of Education stuff:

Further than education
Property Week


The University of Central England’s plans could hold the key to the regeneration of central Birmingham.

By Sean McAllister


Regeneration is firmly on the curriculum at the University of Central England. The Birmingham-based university is planning to consolidate its land holdings and property, and open a new campus in the heart of the city.

But its new estates strategy, which it has shared with Property Week, will have a wider impact than just improving the environment for its students. It will kick-start the city’s biggest regeneration quarter, open up sites for redevelopment and, by making the university more attractive to students, also make the city more attractive to prospective occupiers.

The university is geographically dispersed. Its history stretches back to 1843, but it grew rapidly when it became Birmingham Polytechnic in 1971 and then the University of Central England (UCE Birmingham) in 1992.

It is actually the amalgamation of more than 10 colleges, including the Birmingham School of Music, the Birmingham College of Commerce, South and North Birmingham Technical Colleges and the Bournville College of Art.

This has left a difficult legacy of 24,000 students and 4,000 staff spread across 16 sites, of which 10 are teaching campuses (see map, opposite).

‘At the moment the student experience is not the same everywhere within the university,’ explains pro vice-chancellor Mary Martin. ‘And it is not efficient having 16 sites, because many services are duplicated and running costs are higher than they should be.’

To resolve these problems, the university plans to build a £100m, 370,000 sq ft campus in Birmingham’s key regeneration zone, Eastside, and rationalise its campuses from 16 to three main sites.

It plans to keep its main campus, located three miles north of the city centre in Perry Barr, and its Edgbaston campus, as well as the School of Jewellery in the Jewellery Quarter and space already occupied in Eastside.

In fact, the university has already begun redeveloping the Edgbaston campus, officially opening the £30m Seacole building last month. It also plans to redevelop the 20 acre Perry Barr campus and is in negotiations with Prupim to buy a 2.5 acre chunk of land at adjacent industrial park the Hub.

But its flagship campus will be the new Eastside development. The university is close to agreeing heads of terms with Birmingham City Council to buy a 5 acre site in Eastside, which was due to house the city’s new library before the council performed a U-turn and chose a different location next to Baskerville House. Once the site is secured, UCE Birmingham plans to submit an outline planning application this year and then seek to appoint architects.

‘It’s about the delivery of better education to attract students, rather than being an estates strategy,’ says Barry Allen, director of Savills and property adviser to the university.

‘UCE Birmingham is in competition with other universities and has to work harder to attract students, particularly as they now pay fees.

The quality of the environment is part of the student experience.’

UCE Birmingham already has a presence in Eastside. Around 2,500 students from the Technology Innovation Centre and Birmingham School of Art are based within 145,000 sq ft of the Millennium Point and the New Technology Institute.

But the new 370,000 sq ft campus, which will be a series of about four buildings, including a new conservatoire, will house another 7,500 students and offer world-class facilities. It will help create a single ‘student experience’ across the whole university, accommodate a 25% increase in student numbers within 10 years and give better access to Birmingham’s commercial community.


UCE Birmingham is keen to increase its associations with the city and is considering changing its name to either Birmingham City University, Birmingham Metropolitan University or Birmingham Chamberlain University.

Crucially, the new campus will also raise UCE Birmingham’s profile and visibility.

‘We can do a lot for the city and ourselves by being a lot more visible,’ says Martin.’We want to increase the visibility of the university so that it is not about us being found, but being known where we are.’

Eastside story

The new campus will benefit the city of Birmingham too, as it will increase the visibility and act as a catalyst for Eastside. For more than a decade, the 420 acre regeneration zone has been hailed as integral to enabling Birmingham to expand and become a ‘world city’. There are many developments planned for Eastside but, despite the opening of the Millennium Point in 2001, it is still largely devoid of life.

More than 1,350 student rooms are being built by Unite and developer Watkins Jones Group. The university is also considering building more student accommodation, which will help to create a 24/7 student environment. The conservatoire will bring in music groups from across the Midlands into Eastside at the weekends.

‘The impact will be phenomenal,’ says Clive Dutton, director of planning and regeneration at Birmingham City Council. ‘Education is fundamental. The key in any long-term regeneration is to attract, nurture and retain young talent. UCE’s investment in its educational facilities is therefore paramount.

‘It is also a blue chip partner and it will further cement Eastside’s future.’

Allen adds: ‘Building nearly 400,000 sq ft, albeit phased, is a huge take in any regional market and an immense catalyst to Eastside.

It ticks the boxes of regeneration because it is not just a property development it has a mix of uses and services that will improve the quality of life in that area.’

The opening of a new campus will pave the way to the disposal of several sites across Birmingham. The first to be sold will be Cambrian Hall, behind Baskerville House. Targetfollow is set to pay more than £10m for the 1.3 acre site, which currently has halls of residence with 247 student rooms. As part of the deal, the university will take a one-year leaseback from Targetfollow. It will then vacate to allow for the site to be redeveloped.

The most strategically important site is UCE Birmingham’s ageing 90,000 sq ft conservatoire, which includes Adrian Boult Hall, in Paradise Circus. It will become redundant once the new conservatoire opens in Eastside. It is owned by the university and could, speculates Allen, form the first phase of the redevelopment of Paradise Circus. Argent, the council, Prupim and Copthorne Hotels own the remaining property within Paradise Circus, which includes the city’s library, but redevelopment cannot begin until the library has a new home. That could delay work until 2013 a first phase of development could be completed on the conservatoire site within the same timeframe.

Meanwhile, the university is still considering its options for the School of Art, housed in a Venetian Gothic building on Margaret Street, and the Bournville Campus, six miles south of Eastside.

It is also exploring options for its Gosta Green campus on Corporation Street, which houses part of the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design, and the 18 acre Hamstead campus, home to 700 students in 12 three-storey student accommodation blocks from the 1960s and the grade II-listed Hamstead Hall.

UCE Birmingham’s estates strategy is going to have an enormous influence on development within Birmingham over the next seven years, and particularly on the regeneration work in Eastside.

It seems ironic that university students, normally perceived to be scruffy, are about to play a key role in smartening up this once-derelict quarter of the city.
 

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Planning committee report for 12 July on 12 Gosta Green,Aston,Birmingham - The Art Centre Refurbishment and part demolition of portico building with two storey (& semi basement level) new build to be used for research, educational and clinical purposes,including service area and means of access.

This was approved last week, planning number: C/01944/07/FUL.

New building will house the Aston Academy of Integrative Health Sciences.
 
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