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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
EV charging stations set up in Malaysia

Posted on: October 12th, 2012



First Energy Networks Sdn. Bhd. (FEN) has launched two of the first public Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations in Malaysia, located at P2 of Suria KLCC and on the 5th floor of Lot 10 shopping mall respectively.

FEN, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tan Chong Motor Holdings Bhd. is the first company in Malaysia to offer EV charging services for EVs that could possibly be made available commercially in the future such as the Nissan Leaf.

The launch of the charging stations was conducted in conjunction with the government’s support for a EV charging infrastructure in the country under the National Automotive Policy and the campaign will kickstart with the Bukit Bintang Pilot Program which aims to show how EVs can work in a real world environment.

The public can take a glimpse at the types of charging stations which FEN will install as well as EVs which will make use of these facilities such as the Nissan Leaf, Mitsubishi i-Miev, Renault Fluence ZE and the Proton Exora REEV at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre. They are all part of the EV Pavilion exhibit set up in conjunction with International Greentech and Eco Products Exhibition and Conference Malaysia (IGEM 2012).

http://www.topgear.com/my/7580-ev-charging-stations-set-up-in-malaysia/
http://www.motortrader.com.my/news/first-public-ev-charging-stations-in-malaysia/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
EV charging station launched at Bangsar Shopping Centre
Written by Mick Chan, Published on May 8, 2013 1:41 pm,
one comment



With the fourth EV charging station by First Energy Networks Sdn Bhd now launched in the populous suburb of Bangsar, it is safe to assume that Edaran Tan Chong Motor (ETCM) is poised to launched the Nissan Leaf for public sale soon.

FEN is a subsidiary of Tan Chong Motor Holdings Bhd, which already has charging stations in KLCC, Lot 10 Shopping Centre and Petronas Solaris in Serdang set up to the tune of approximately RM25,000 per charging station.

Located in the lower ground floor of the Bangsar Shopping Centre car park, the latest addition to FEN's fleet of electric vehicle chargers is a General Electric Durastation Level 2 charger, which is capable of fully charging a 24kWh battery in four to eight hours.

It is clear that ETCM is paving the way towards widespread viability of electric vehicles starting with the Klang Valley, and the installation of these universally-compatible electric vehicle charging stations is intended to complement the introduction of the Nissan Leaf into the Malaysian market.


http://www.cbt.com.my/2013/05/08/ev-charging-station-launched-at-bangsar-shopping-centre/
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some news on the Green Energy.

Going Green: Electric Vehicles, 0% Emissions

Oct 14, 2013

Last weekend, Hatten Cares in collaboration with TC Euro Sdn Bhd, First Energy Networks, GreenTech Malaysia and Melaka State Government organised a large-scale launch event, officiated by the Chief Minister of Melaka, in support of eco-friendly, 0% emissions, Electric Vehicles (EV).

Hatten Cares is now the proud host of the very FIRST EV Charger in Melaka with a permanent unit installed on the 3rd level carpark of Hatten Square. This event was highly significant for the state of Melaka as it marks our keen initiative towards becoming more eco-friendly and environmentally aware.

Unlike Hybrid cars, EVs are solely electric-powered so they are totally kind to the environment. Speaking from personal experience, having test driven the EV, the handling is so easy and you’d be surprised how quiet the engine is. EVs are definitely the future of the automobile industry with more and more people embracing a ‘greener’ way of life.




http://hattencares.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/going-green-electric-vehicles-0-emissions/
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Electric Cars in Malaysia: An Overview


August 17 , 2013 | by Tien Chew



Electric cars are a niche group in the automotive industry and have been trying to gain a foothold in both sales and popularity in recent years. Recently electric cars have become available for purchase in Malaysia, and the Government, under Budget 2012, has offered full exemption for import tax and excise tax to support this type of vehicle through 2013 year end.



Introduction to Electric Cars


Unlike traditional combustion engines found in a huge majority of cars on the road, electrical cars forgo the need of petroleum and opt for electricity instead. This not only makes electrical cars cleaner, it also makes them less susceptible to a variety of regular maintenance traditional cars must undergo.

Electric vehicles utilize rechargeable battery packs, are energy efficient, and are environmentally friendly. While this seems to be a big step forward in the right direction for the automotive industry to eliminate the need for petroleum (a depleting resource), electric vehicles still have a way to go before they are seen on the road en masse.

The Role of Electric Cars in Malaysia

Malaysia is still a potential market for electric vehicles to gain widespread acceptance, but electric car manufacturers need to be tact and play it smart if electric cars are to gain popularity among the masses.

Fortunately, under Malaysia’s 2012 budget, the Government has given full exemption of import and excise tax on hybrid and electric cars below 2,000 cc until December 31, 2013.

The first electric car to be launched in Malaysia is the Mitsubishi i-MiEV, which packs a pretty hefty price, considering it is a hatchback. Even though potential owners get to enjoy a full tax exemption in efforts to promote electric cars, the i-MiEV sits at RM136,118.50 without insurance, which is roughly equivalent to the price of three Proton Sagas.

Although Mitsubishi managed to be the one to introduce the electric car to Malaysian audiences, BMW and Nissan aren’t going to sit back and watch them claim the lion’s share of this corner of the market.

BMW has recently launched the “i” series, their group of electric cars. Unfortunately, the BMW i3 is not coming to Malaysia in the near future. Although BMW hasn’t announced a price point for the i3, based on its pricing in Europe, it has been speculated to make its debut at around RM150,000-RM200,000.

Nissan also plans to introduce their aptly named “Leaf” electrical car to the Malaysian market sometime around the 3rd quarter of the year, making it the second electrical car to grace Malaysian shores.

Local automotive production company Proton has also been said to dabble in trying their hands out in the electric car market, in hopes of cutting back carbon emissions in the country. Paul Tan’s local, famous automotive website reported that Parliament mentioned that Proton will be releasing electric cars in 2014. While electric car technology is nowhere near as developed and common as it is hoped to be, it is a huge step forward for the global automotive industry. As man expect, remaining fossil fuels will only last for a finite number of years.



The Malaysian Electrical Car Infrastructure

Sure electric cars will save you on petrol costs, but let’s not be coy; the money you save on petrol is nowhere near enough to offset an electric car’s price at the moment.

Petroleum is relatively cheap in Malaysia, thanks to a government owned Petronas that subsidizes the cost of this precious natural resource. As such, the money spent on your electric car in Malaysia would not likely benefit you as much as it would benefit the environment. Sure electric cars have cleaner emissions than a hybrid vehicle, but it also takes awhile to fully recharge their batteries. Yes electric cars are more energy efficient, but they still lack the average going distance or convenience of traditional petroleum based cars before running out of juice. That being said, Tesla’s model S can drive up to 480km (300 miles) at speeds of 88 km/hour (55 m/hour).

Furthermore, charging your electric vehicle in times of emergency may prove to be a challenge in Malaysia. While government plans have introduced free charging stations for anybody with a fully electrical vehicle, it is nowhere as widespread and easily found as petrol stations, with most of those charging stations situated around a small area in the Klang Valley: Lot 10 and Suria KLCC for now. Although plans are underway to implement more charging stations around the country, it simply is not at the widespread level to provide electric car owners with a desired charge if need be. While you can also use a standard electric outlet to charge the car, this takes longer than a high power wall charger.

As mentioned in a previous BMW i3 post, apartment and condominium owners will most likely find it troublesome to find an electrical charge outlet as most shared residential locations have not implemented them yet.



Takeaways

Electric cars are slowly getting to the point of having advanced technologies packaged in an affordable price. This is not the case in Malaysia, however, as even the the Mitsubishi i-MiEV sells for over RM100,000+. Despite the tax exemption status, the expensive price for electric vehicles limits its appeal to high-mid and upper classes earners, and those willing to fork out the money to help out the environment.

For electric cars to be successful here in Malaysia, charging stations and the supporting infrastructure needs to be more commonplace. Although it is fair to judge the electric car industry as unestablished in Malaysia , it is safe to speculate that electric vehicles will be the best option for supporting the environment and for personal travel costs in the not too distant future. It is good to see that Malaysia is at least taking measures to ensure that the electrical future for the car will be a promising one.

Would you buy an electric vehicle in Malaysia? What are your thoughts about electric cars? Share a thought in the comments below.

http://leapingpost.com/2013/08/17/electric-car-malaysia/
 

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The Nissan Leaf costs RM200 000, not a very accessible price.To the low and middle class, petrol cars have more value, for the rich, why bother?
you can blame the gov. for the price. it starts at $20k in USA. on the flip side, the road tax is only RM10, which is the minimum...

the new NAP which will be announce in nov/dec should point a better direction of how EE cars will be priced. currently it's tax exempt for hybrid cars but in reality, those diesels and electric are as good if not better in terms of energy efficiency and should be given the same tax-free incentives...

hopefully, with this subsidy "rationalisation" comes with EURO 4/6 fuels which in turn give us those hyper-efficient european engines that malaysian are missing...
 

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you can blame the gov. for the price. it starts at $20k in USA. on the flip side, the road tax is only RM10, which is the minimum...

the new NAP which will be announce in nov/dec should point a better direction of how EE cars will be priced. currently it's tax exempt for hybrid cars but in reality, those diesels and electric are as good if not better in terms of energy efficiency and should be given the same tax-free incentives...

hopefully, with this subsidy "rationalisation" comes with EURO 4/6 fuels which in turn give us those hyper-efficient european engines that malaysian are missing...
I look at the price in Australia ,its about $40k, which is very expensive by their standard, that price can still get them a luxury car. So even without the excise duties the Nissan Leaf will still be about RM120k if directly converting the Aussie price. Proton engineers claim that their Saga EV can be as low as RM70k which is close to the US price as you stated.
http://www.carsguide.com.au/news-and-reviews/car-news/nissan_leaf_slashed_to_39990_drive_away

The high cost of EV cars comes from the batteries, which uses minerals and metals that are not easily produced and dangerous that some European states and US states ban their manufacturing. Even if the world bans petrol cars, we will not be able to manufacture enough batteries and we will need to ruin alot of South American forests to dig for the metals/minerals needed.Another con is that in accidents, these batteries can blow up, there has been cases of Chevrolet Volt and BYD EV cars catching fire suddenly.So I think we are still are the early stages of EV cars before they can be used by the mass.

In the meantime, more focus should be to reduce engine size and improve fuel consumption. The NAP should give incentives on small engine cars like the recent Kia Picanto which I agree with you, should be considered in the same segment as green cars. With Proton privatized by DRB, I hope the NAP can be liberalized more.BTW, with the GST, car prices should reduce abit as the GST 6% is lower than the 10% Sales Tax on cars.:banana:
 

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See see, so very few charging station in Klang Valley. no wonder la the workers at Panahome Show house in PJ told me that EV owner sometimes come to their show house to and charge their vehicle there since its really hard to find a charging station :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
See see, so very few charging station in Klang Valley. no wonder la the workers at Panahome Show house in PJ told me that EV owner sometimes come to their show house to and charge their vehicle there since its really hard to find a charging station :lol:
Yea..that's the reason why I created this thread so we can witness how our government implement this and how it will affect us as a petro/gas producer & car producer too. :lol: In fact Philippine is doing the same at the moment. Hopefully our country wont fall behind other ASEAN countries...again. :eek:hno:
 

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i hope the government will continue with tax exemption for hybrid cars below 2000cc and EVs...the policy expires end of 2013. Most companies expect the government to restrict tax exemption to locally assembled hybrids etc. Not good news, if they do so what would be the point of installing all these charging stations?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Published: Thursday December 19, 2013 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Thursday December 19, 2013 MYT 9:42:37 AM

Electric car is the future



by zuhrin azam ahmad

PUTRAJAYA: Malaysia is committed to reducing carbon emission and fully supports the development of electric cars, said Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak.

He said the world had used fossil fuel for over a century to drive economic growth.

“We have prospered and increased global wealth but all this has come at a cost. Carbon emission is affecting the climate.

“Climate changes has brought devastation to all parts of the world. We cannot continue on the same trajectory.

“We need to reduce carbon emission and the electric car is the solution. I truly believe this is the car of the future,” he said at the signing of an agreement to host Round Two of the Formula E race here yesterday.



Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak getting to know about Formula-e racing car with CEO of FEH Alejandro Agag while Formula E Malaysia Sdn Bhd CEO Datuk Seri Johann Young (left) looks on after launching the events in Putrajaya
Driving change: Najib being briefed by FEH chief executive officer Alejandro Agag on a Formula E racing car while Young (on Alejandro’s right) looks on after the launch of the event in Putrajaya.


http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nati...ia-committed-to-reducing-carbon-emission.aspx
 
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