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Emerging Kerala - Biennial Global Connect

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Emerging Kerala is planned as a biennial Global Connect, the first being 'Emerging Kerala 2012' scheduled to be held from 12th – 14th September 2012 at Le Meridien Convention Centre, Kochi, Kerala. The Hon'ble Prime Minister of India, Manmohan Singh would inaugurate the three-day investment summit.

The event is organised by the Kerala State Industrial Development Corporation (KSIDC) with the support of the Government of Kerala (GoK), in addition to various Trade and Industrial bodies. The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and National Association of Software & Services Companies (NASSCOM) are event partners.


Website: www.emergingkerala2012.org
: www.facebook.com/EmergingKerala

: www.twitter.com/emergingkerala



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Urban Development- Kerala’s Growth Engine :part 1

Kerala has the distinction of having more cities with a population of over one million than many small developed countries. With seven urban agglomerations – Trivandrum, Ernakulam, Kozhikode, Thrissur, Malappuram, Kannur and Kollam – in this bracket, Kerala ties with Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous State, and is ahead of states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra. Moreover, the 2011 Census has shown significant rates of urbanization in almost every district in the State. All in all, this data confirms what the people of the State have known for quite some time now…the traditional village has gone the way of the dodo. Kerala now has an urban continuum that stretches almost the entire length and breadth of its densely populated coastal plain. Although lovers of the charms of rustic life may lament this fact, urbanization need not be a bad thing. Worldwide, it has been noted that urbanization has improved the lives of people, not only by improving the standard of living through better facilities, but also by facilitating the development of the economy from one dependent on agriculture and industry to one driven by services. This inevitably results in higher per capita income levels. That said, there’s an important caveat. The process of urbanization has to be well managed in a planned and equitable fashion, else this societal transformation could well create a new class of urban poor, overstretched urban infrastructure and misery all around.

As Kerala looks towards a strategic plan to achieve its economic and social goals in 2030, planned urban development will not only be a critical enabler to achieve balanced and sustainable growth but can also be an exciting area for investment opportunities and employment generation.

The Areas for Investment and Development

At a macro level, there are two broad areas for investment and development in urban growth – the physical infrastructure elements that tie cities together and the social infrastructure that provides a high quality of life for the citizens. Physical infrastructure encompasses a diverse set of elements ranging from urban roads and mass transit facilities to sewage systems and solid waste management facilities. Facilities such as airports, road and rail terminals and inter-city highways also overlap with urban infrastructure. Social Infrastructure includes residential, commercial and institutional real estate which creates the means for citizens to Live, Work and Play. Physical infrastructure tends to be developed by public agencies -urban local governments and State Government agencies- or through Public Private Partnerships or PPPs, whereas social infrastructure is primarily created by the private sector.

Kerala’s cities are already witness to significant activity in the private development of real estate, primarily in Trivandrum, Ernakulam and Kozhikode, as well as in public investment in areas such as water supply, road improvement projects, sewage systems, solid waste processing and mass transit. Projects adding up to over Rs 20,000 Crore are under planning or in various stages of development. Notable examples of the latter include Trivandrum City Road Improvement Project or TCRIP, the JICA-funded water supply schemes, JNNURM-funded projects in Trivandrum and Ernakulam, and the mass transit projects in Trivandrum, Kozhikode and Ernakulam. Similar projects are either already in progress or on the anvil in the smaller cities such as Thrissur, Kannur, Kollam, Kottayam and Alappuzha, powering Kerala’s growth engine- urbanization.

http://blog.emergingkerala2012.org/urban-development-keralas-growth-engine-part-1/
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