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My favourite Cathedral - Winchester Cathedral. I think its the third most powerful diocese in the Church of England after Canterbury and York if I remember right.
 

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Some Bristol Churches:

Firstly - Bristol Cathedral (The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity)





Clifton Cathedral (The Cathedral Church of SS. Peter and Paul)









And St Mary Redcliffe (NOT a Cathedral - although often mistaken for one!):





 

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make it so...
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salsibury:



southwark:



glastonbury abby
coventry (old & new)
westminster abby
st. pauls


i'm not religious by any means but my favorite places to see in the UK were the cathederals and abbies....besides the pubs.
 

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Disco and drugs trade
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As regards the insides of Churches, don't really go into them, as I start to get a strange burning sensation all over.

But I really like Westminister Cathedrial, not the abby but the Catholic one, came as a total suprise to me as was wondering the streets of London and I just came across it.



it's almost as nice as St. Pancreas!
 

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Nice thread, i'll put some manc ones up.

St Ann's Church - 1712

Built in local pink sandstone, St Ann's church is an elegant, neo-classical building dating from 1712, and often ascribed to Sir Christopher Wren or one of his pupils. It is a Grade 1 listed building of historic and architectural merit. Its distinguished round arched windows with two-storey Corinthian pilasters is typical of the classical revival style, as is the large rounded apse at the high altar end of the church.
Originally the tower was topped by a wooden spire - long since disappeared. Inside are galleries supported by rather stocky Tuscan columns, and windows are glazed with 19th century stained glass by Frederick Shields. It is still debatable whether the church was named after St Ann, or after Lady Ann Bland, who seems to have financed most of its construction.
The church tower is said to mark the exact centre of the city of Manchester, and was at one time used as a platform from which surveyors could make distance measurements - the cut arrow benchmark can still be found to the left of the tower doorway. The church was initially frequented by the cream of Manchester society and its pews could be rented; the best seats cost around £100, a small fortune in those days!
St Ann's is the only one of the 19 city centre churches built in the 18th century to survive. It was restored by Alfred Waterhouse in 1891. Free recitals and musical performances are on offer here at lunchtime.

Recent photos




 

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Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester. The cathedral's official name is The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George in Manchester.

Although constructed over a period of 600 years, its main architectural style is Perpendicular Gothic, replete with tall windows and flat fan-vaulted ceilings. The interior of the church contains many pieces of period art, notably the medieval woodcarvings of the Ripon Carvers.

History


- The first recorded Christian church in Manchester was built in the 7th century. After this was destroyed by the invading Danes, King Edward the Elder ordered the building of a new church near the earlier site in 923. This church was recorded in the Doomsday book as St. Mary's.

- Work on the current building began in 1215

- King King Henry V chartered the church as a collegiate foundation in 1421 and it has had close ties with education ever since.

- The church was expanded many times over the following centuries by various town notables, and had its treasures plundered several times (notably by Edward VI in 1550 and during the English Civil War in 1649).

- In 1847, some extensive rebuilding and refacing also took place during the 1800s, so that the buildings do not look as old as other buildings of comparable antiquity.

- During World War II, a German bomb severely damaged the cathedral; it took nearly twenty years to repair all of the destruction.

- The cathedral became a Grade I listed building on January 25, 1952.

- The building was again damaged by an IRA bomb in 1996.

- The cathedral houses extensive parish and historical archives, dating back to 1421.

Recent Photos













 

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Disco and drugs trade
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Saw this one in Stoke on Trent/Tunstal



Rather liked the green copper domes, which looks better from the distance than close to be honest, alas I didn't really get a good picture of it, sorry!

Still it's got some nice castle like look to it, don't fink?


Lucky for the internet I can just, borrow images Hurrah!
 

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I've always liked this one, St. Barts in Leeds, nothing too subtle about it!



Big Brooding and visable from miles away due to the big hill it sits on.
 

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Amat victoria curam...
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(Just posted this on the world forum, but wanted to share it here too - it's a tad picture-heavy, but some of the pics are worth the wait so bare with it!)

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*** England's Grand Old Cathedrals, Churches and Abbeys ***


You're never far away from a big church or cathedral in England - the country was built, reformed, destroyed and rebuilt around them. The fact that so many remain after hundreds of years of weathering, collapsing towers, unstable foundations, fires and reformation, is a tribute to the both the original architects and those that maintain and protect them today.

I've only recently become intrigued by the aura, majesty and intricate design of these buildings, so I thought I'd share my new-found fascination here. Suffice to say I got a bit carried away... and have included a silly number of photos of what I believe to be some of the finest Christian churches in England. While I hope most of the major ones are covered, this is in no way a comprehensive list, so please feel free to add others if you genuinely feel they are worthy of the company!

I've purposely avoided including either modern-style Cathedrals, such as Coventry and Liverpool RC or ruins of the epic Abbeys such as Fountains and Glastonbury, simply because I ran out of patience! Also, I'm keeping information about each one to a minimum, again because I've already bored myself doing this, so I'll let the pictures do the talking...

Oh, and this is purely meant to be for info and shared interest only - I've got no real agenda here and am certainly not trying to suggest that these are the finest collection of Cathedrals and Churches around, so lets try and avoid any petty "my country/city/***** is bigger/better than yours" arguments please people...

Enjoy!


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Buildings featured (no particular order):

- Salisbury Cathedral
- Westminster Abbey
- York Minster
- Lincoln Cathedral
- Peterborough Cathedral
- Canterbury Cathedral
- Durham Cathedral
- St. Paul’s Cathedral
- Beverley Minster
- Wells Cathedral
- Winchester Cathedral
- Norwich Cathedral
- Norwich's RC Cathedral
- Gloucester Cathedral
- Lichfield Cathedral
- Exeter Cathedral
- Bath Abbey
- Ely Cathedral
- Chichester Cathedral
- Worcester Cathedral
- St. Botolph’s Church
- Chester Cathedral
- Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
- Truro Cathedral
- St. Albans Cathedral
- St. Mary Redcliffe Church
- Bristol Cathedral
- Rochester Cathedral
- Westminster Cathedral

- Selby Abbey
- Tewkesbury Abbey
- Southwell Minster
- Arundel Cathedral
- St. Edmundsbury Cathedral
- Wakefield Cathedral
- Southwark Cathedral
- St. George's Chapel
- Christ Church
- St James' Church
- Wilton Church
- Kings College Chapel
- Chelmsford Cathedral
- Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church

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- Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire: 1220-1320:







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- Westminster Abbey, London: 1045-1517:







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- York Minster, York, Yorkshire: 1080-1360:







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- St. Paul’s Cathedral, London: 1670-1710:







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- Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire: 1072-1280:






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- Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent: 1070-1510:







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- Peterborough Cathedral, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire: 1116-1496:





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- Durham Cathedral, Durham, County Durham: 1093-1280:






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- Beverley Minster, Beverley, Yorkshire: 1220-1425:






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- Wells Cathedral, Wells, Somerset: 1180-1392:







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- Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, Hampshire: 1079-1410:






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- Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolk: 1096-1430:






(Not to be confused with Norwich's Roman Catholic Cathedral; St John's):



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- Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucester, Gloucestershire : 1089-1470:






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- Lichfield Cathedral, Lichfield, Staffordshire: 1195-1335:







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- Exeter Cathedral, Exeter, Devon: 1133-1400:





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- Bath Abbey, Bath: 1499-1539:







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- Ely Cathedral, Ely, Cambridgeshire: 1083-1349:







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- Chichester Cathedral, Chichester, West Sussex: 1076-c1600:






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- Worcester Cathedral, Worccester, Worcestershire: 1084-1432:






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- St. Botolph’s Church, Boston, Lancashire: 1309-1520:






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- Chester Cathedral, Chester, Chesire: 1092-1250:





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- Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool, Merseyside: 1904-1942:







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- Truro Cathedral, Truro, Cornwall: 1880-1910:







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- St. Albans Cathedral, St. Albans, Hertfordshire: 1077-c1365:






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- St. Mary Redcliffe Church, Bristol: c1200-1571:





(Not to be confused with the equally-impressive nearby Bristol Cathedral):




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- Rochester Cathedral, Rochester, Kent: c1090-1343:






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- Westminster Cathedral (Roman Catholic), London: 1892-1903:





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Other honourable mentions (ok, so I just got lazy...)

Selby Abbey, Selby, Yorkshire:



Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire:



Southwell Minster, Southwell, Nottinghamshire:



Arundel Cathedral, Arundel, West Sussex:



St. Edmundsbury Cathedral, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk:



Wakefield Cathedral, Wakefield, Yorkshire:



Southwark Cathedral, London:



St. George's Chapel, Windsor, Berkshire:



Christ Church, Oxford, Oxfordshire:



St James' Church, Louth, Lincolnshire:



Wilton Church, Wilton, Wiltshire:



Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire:



Chelmsford Cathedral, Chelmsford, Essex:



Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire:


.
 

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Great thread!! I also find stuff like this very interesting. I thought I knew a lot about English cathedrals, but I had never heard of half of these. Good job!
 

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Excellent work! Our cathedrals/ abbeys etc are a great asset to this country.

Great Malvern Priory:




St Chads Cathedral, Birmingham (very hidden away):


St Philips Cathedral, Birmingham (one of the smallest in the country):
 

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Great pics, so many wonderful examples of architecture. The Normans sure did a lot to improve England, and the country is better because of them!

The really sad thing is, in this modern day and age, when building work should be so much simpler, quicker, more efficient and better organised, you have to ask: will we ever see such buildings of their quality being constructed ever again....??? I doubt it!

In those days, if someone said 'build me a cathedral', they'd immediately start planning a grande building with quality stonework, spires, buttreses, stained glass windows, intricate artwork and detail, statues etc etc etc.

Now, if someone said 'build me a cathedral' they'd come up with a glass box and call it contemporary and innovative....
 

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The really sad thing is, in this modern day and age, when building work should be so much simpler, quicker, more efficient and better organised, you have to ask: will we ever see such buildings of their quality being constructed ever again....??? I doubt it!

In those days, if someone said 'build me a cathedral', they'd immediately start planning a grande building with quality stonework, spires, buttreses, stained glass windows, intricate artwork and detail, statues etc etc etc.

Now, if someone said 'build me a cathedral' they'd come up with a glass box and call it contemporary and innovative....
Cannot agree with you there Jack. You're condeming contemporary architecture because you reckon if they were to build a cathedral, it'd be limited to a 'glass box'. Have you ever been inside Liverpool Met? It's an astoundingly impressive and grand building. On the scale as the norman cathedrals, and in the same vain of grandeur. I'd argue that if cathedrals were the thing now, they'd be built like this. Unfortunately there's little evidence out there.



 
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