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Surprisingly optimistic!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Halibet housing complex as seen below is currently being built around the Halibet hospital. These modern homes and apartment complexes are going to have a soccer field, a gym, a basketball court, a tennis court, a swimming pool, a small park and will have some of the most modern houses and apartment complexes present in the horn of Africa.


This photo below is located just outside of Asmara, around north-west of the city. Since Yahoo's satellite maps for Eritrea haven't been updated in over a year and a half, we can clearly see that this area had no new construction or any housing present. However, if you look at the Google'a satellite photo below this one, you'll see new apartment buildings being constructed. Google's satellite updates Eritrea's image every 90 days or so, so anyone looking to see for new development in Asmara can use Yahoo's outdated maps with Google's updated maps to see if any changes have taken place within the last year and half.


The image below is a screen shot of these new Asmara appartment buildings from Eri TV


The image below is of the blue print of what the new 5 star hotel in Asmara will look like. Construction of this hotel will set to commence in 2011.


The following pictures are of housing constructions in Asmara in the past decade. Much of the new construction to take place in Asmara has been around the Sembel and Kahawta areas.
















































Photo below shows a very modern looking house with a swimming pool.


New modern homes near Sembel, Asmara.


These 32 modern homes are located near the Halibet hospital. They are part of the new 700 modern homes to be built within the next few years. Most of these houses are constructed for the diaspora Eritreans. These houses can cost from 150,000 to 200,000 USD range.

Click here if you want to see these homes via Google maps.





Photo of the left is of the Orota Referral Hospital.


Photo on the left is the Asmara Sembel housing unit.





 

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I find it funny that you're doing what Eritreans themselves should be doing instead of what they're doing now.


Nice pics. I like that the fences are short and the attention to pavements.
 

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Surprisingly optimistic!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I find it funny that you're doing what Eritreans themselves should be doing instead of what they're doing now.
Well I felt bad when I said "I dislike it when good things happen in Eritrea", which in reality do not believe, and I think Eritrea isn't present enough.. just the haters.
 

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Mutu ya Chuma.
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Very nice. the Sidewalks are very clean. Fences are shorter that very nice.

But where are the people? Almost every photo i've been seeing, almost like ghost city.
 
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These houses can cost from 150,000 to 200,000 USD range.

Honestly, that is very cheap. How much would they cost in Ethiopia? Somali houses in Somalia only cost 85K for 4 bedrooms.

I think Horners Diaspora should get into the housing market while it’s cheap. Some of the houses posted look extremely modern

Problem with Eritrea is we don't get enough pictures
 

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These houses can cost from 150,000 to 200,000 USD range.

Honestly, that is very cheap. How much would they cost in Ethiopia? Somali houses in Somalia only cost 85K for 4 bedrooms.

I think Horners Diaspora should get into the housing market while it’s cheap. Some of the houses posted look extremely modern

Problem with Eritrea is we don't get enough pictures
A house like that in a good neighborhood in Addis will cost you an arm and a leg. It's going to be in the $350 000-$450 000 range at least.

I think there's a serious bubble in Ethiopia. :eek:hno:
 
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A house like that in a good neighborhood in Addis will cost you an arm and a leg. It's going to be in the $350 000-$450 000 range at least.

I think there's a serious bubble in Ethiopia. :eek:hno:
Are you serious? That’s ridiculous

We recently brought our house in Australia, 4 bedrooms with everything practically for 320K. Australia itself is facing a housing bubble.

Would houses be cheaper in smaller cities such as Jimma,Axum and Gondar?
 

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I think there's a serious bubble in Ethiopia. :eek:hno:
That's what I fear as well. I wouldn't buy a house now if I had the money. The lack of cement is driving the production costs up a lot, once the cement production catch up, boom! The current prices in Addis Ababa are ridiculously exaggerated.

^^ Great looking neighborhoods, clean and wide sidewalks makes a huge differences. I agree with Butembo, it's a surprisingly "calm" city.
 

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Are you serious? That’s ridiculous

We recently brought our house in Australia, 4 bedrooms with everything practically for 320K. Australia itself is facing a housing bubble.

Would houses be cheaper in smaller cities such as Jimma,Axum and Gondar?
They'd be way cheaper there of course, but new houses everywhere in the country are too expensive considering the economic condition of the country.

The major reasons are the ancient construction methods which require a ton of cement (and there's been a serious shortage in the country the last few years), the length of time required to build (ridiculously long, which inflates the cost of labor among other things), the fact that demand always faaaaar outpaces supply, speculation, diaspora Ethiopians buying property, etc.

The funny thing is, when people think of slums, they think desperately poor. In Addis, you'll find the middle class living in slums. The only people who live in decent homes are: expats, those who work for foreign organizations, Ethiopians who purchased property while they were abroad, those who live in family homes passed down over the years, some wealthy business owners. That's about it.
The average person just cannot afford decent housing because there's so few of them.

I'll never forget when I went to visit a woman after she gave birth. She lived in the slums right off Sheraton (the one being cleared) and I was bracing myself for intense poverty. Let me tell you, her house had everything, a nice sofa set, a dining table/chairs, commodes, TV, DVD player with a quite large collection of DVDs, ArabSat, a music system, a fridge, etc.
She was not dirt poor, she just couldn't afford to move out. This is a huge issue for urbanites in Ethiopia, but construction companies are all focusing on the high end and construction moves at snail's pace, which leaves people like her with no options.

I can't wait to see a boom in construction for middle class housing.
 

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Simfan, you only created this copy and paste thread so you wouldn't be banned for bashing Eritreans and suffering from an inferiorty conplex towards them. All your images and information you posted is directly copied and pasted from this Link: http://www.madote.com/2010/07/photos-of-new-asmara-housing.html




Very nice. the Sidewalks are very clean. Fences are shorter that very nice.
Nice sidwalks, nice fences, Oh please stop, you're making us blush. That's like telling a super model she has nice nails and toes...WTF lol


But where are the people? Almost every photo i've been seeing, almost like ghost city.
The people are working, going to school, playing soccer, bowling, or at downtown. Btw, these are residental houses, how many residental areas in America do you see with people just randomly walking around? Most American and European countries residential areas are quite, with hardly any people to be seen. I'm looking outside my window right now and I see not a soul in sight.

I know most African nation's capitals look and feel like this picture below:




But in Asmara, that's not the case. Almost everything is different in Asmara. For starters, 90% of all the stores shut down from 12 PM to 1:30 PM every day. Most store owners go home to take a quick nap or just relax to drink tea. I think this was adopted from the British.

In addition to that, everyone in Asmara follows the mediterranean style. By that I mean, at sunset, the city sets out on a massive passegiatta, where old men in double-breasted suits doffing Borsolino hats, young children, teenagers, lovers, and everyone and their mama go out on a causual stroll in downtown, Asmara. people great one another, drink coffee, chit-chat, and keep in touch. It's like a facebook but in real life.


Asmara as a city is a Unesco World Heritage Site. It's also one of the very few African capitals that were well planned out. You actually feel like you are some European city when you walk around Asmara. Believe me, my first visit, it didn't hit me I was in Africa till I left the capital. Asmara also attracts a lot of hot white girls from Europe who want to experience an African country but still gives them the comfort of a European charm. My last visit, I ran into a lot of European girls who now live there. Girls seem to think the older a building is, the more romantic it is. So their lust for romance makes them live in Asmara. Asmara is like whine, the older it gets, the more expensive, tastier, and coveted it becomes.

The city's population is around 800,000. So from an African standard, Asmara is a "ghost town", but from a western and European standard, Asmara is normal. No one wants to be around a crowed all the time. The reason why most African capitals are over croweded is because their cities are not well planned. In addition to that, anyone from the countryside flocks to the capitals, with no restrictions, creating large slums around the city. In Asmara, you can't just flock to the capital and crowed the joint. You need to either want to open a buisness there or buy a home to move in. In Asmara, all the croweds are centered for downtown. The residential areas are kept quite, just like Europe and north America.

 

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Surprisingly optimistic!
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
On November 28, 2009, the highly anticipated Pushkin Monument was inaugurated. Many government officials, members of the Russian Parliament, and foreign guests took part in the historic ceremony. Mr. Tewolde Kelati, the administrator of the Central region, stated the monument of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin, who was one-eight Eritrean, is the first of its kind in Africa. The Eritrean government hopes the erection of the Pushkin monument and the subsequent opening of the Pushkin Cultural Center would assist in contributing to developing arts, culture and education at the national level.

Mr. Kelati noted that the construction of the Pushkin Monument would create a link between Eritrean and Russian cultures. He went on to conclude that Eritrea desires in developing a closer cultural link based on mutual equality between both nations.

Other notable speakers of the event was Mrs. Elena Drapeko, who is a member of the Russian Parliament. She added that Pushkin’s timeless artistic works are cherished across the globe, and went on to mention the poet was proud of his African origin. Furthermore, she expressed the erection of the monument would play a important and vital role in enhancing Eritrean-Russian relations.
From the Shabia
Solar water heating project in Eritrea

Eritrea's solar project was established and funded with the collaboration of myclimate.org and Ökozentrum Langenbruck in 2004. The task of building and installing up to 200 solar plants was given to the local Eritrean company of Tesinma Sh. Co. Each single plants of solar panel came equipped with nearly 37 gallons of storage tank and consisted of a surface area of two square meters. Most of these solar panels were put in place over the roof tops of public and private buildings through out Asmara and Sawa.

Before the implementation of these projects, Eritreans normally relied on electric boilers, electric continuous-flow water heaters, and water heaters that ran on petroleum oil. All those options were not environmentally friendly and created pollution.

As a result of the training and technical support given by the Okozentrum Langebruk, Eritrean technicians are now able to produce and manufacture these power heating solar panels with out assistance and supervision of foreign technicians. This renewable heat resource will greatly assist Eritreans and bring them one step closer to the path of self-sufficiency.


Photo above: Eritrean technicians creating a solar panal


Photo above: Eritrean technicians creating solar panal


Photo above: Technicians installing the solar panel into a rooftop
all photos presented in this article are from myclimate.org

:applause::applause:
 
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