Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Surprisingly optimistic!
Joined
·
12,864 Posts
I know I take your side a lot these sorts of these things sunta sunte, but really, enough of this negativity. It is nothing we already don't know. We need to look at what's happening and try to be constructive with our criticism rather than dragging things down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
^^ you know you are over the top when the complainer-in-chief himself asks you to tone it down :lol:
Ok sir!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
sad story of kids adopted in US

here is a very sad and touching documentary about Ethiopian kids adopted in America.
listen to those teens, some of them live in the street, are homeless, wrongly accused....

it sounds like some American families adopt ethiopian kids the same way they adopt dogs/cats or any pet. once they become "too big" they can freely get rid of them...awful !
:eek:hno::eek:hno:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,719 Posts
^^ I'm always conflicted about the issue of international adoptions. I think everyone would prefer that kids could grow in their own country with Ethiopian parents. But the reality in Ethiopia is a very harsh one for most orphans. Is it better for a kid to grow on the streets of Addis, sleeping rough on the streets, open to all kinds of abuses, maltreatment and disease? It is true that some foreign adoptions end up really bad for the kids, but those are in the minority. I personally know several adopted kids in the Seattle area who are raised in loving homes with all the opportunities that life in an affluent society provides. We rarely hear of the successful adoptions, only the horrible ones make the news. If it was up to me, I wouldn't have banned foreign adoptions outright. Maybe put very strict requirements on adoption, but not ban it completely. I don't think Ethiopia is ready yet to take care of its thousands upon thousands of orphans and unwanted kids. Maybe in a decade or two, but not now.
 

·
Moderator
ye Kebele chairman
Joined
·
4,509 Posts
^^ I'm always conflicted about the issue of international adoptions. I think everyone would prefer that kids could grow in their own country with Ethiopian parents. But the reality in Ethiopia is a very harsh one for most orphans. Is it better for a kid to grow on the streets of Addis, sleeping rough on the streets, open to all kinds of abuses, maltreatment and disease? It is true that some foreign adoptions end up really bad for the kids, but those are in the minority. I personally know several adopted kids in the Seattle area who are raised in loving homes with all the opportunities that life in an affluent society provides. We rarely hear of the successful adoptions, only the horrible ones make the news. If it was up to me, I wouldn't have banned foreign adoptions outright. Maybe put very strict requirements on adoption, but not ban it completely. I don't think Ethiopia is ready yet to take care of its thousands upon thousands of orphans and unwanted kids. Maybe in a decade or two, but not now.
I tend to agree. I propose that we look to a compromise system.

I know Ethiopia is a poor nation with limited resources but I believe we can set up a monitoring system with children that are adopted. Officials (maybe embassy officials or consular, along with local law enforcement/social services) would visit the homes of these adopted children every month to make sure of their safety and living conditions.

While recognizing that the above ^^ maybe difficult to implement, an outright ban on adoptions is a bit harsh imo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
Ethiopia bans foreign adoptions
10 January 2018
Ethiopia has banned the adoption of children by foreigners amid concerns they face abuse and neglect abroad.
Ethiopia is one of the biggest source countries for international adoptions by US citizens, accounting for about 20% of the total.
Celebrities Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are among those who have adopted children from Ethiopia.
However, in 2013, a US couple were convicted of killing an adopted Ethiopian girl.
That case triggered a debate about foreign adoption, the BBC's Emmanuel Igunza in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa says.
The adoption process in Ethiopia has also faced serious questions with rights groups saying that it was prone to abuse by human traffickers who saw it as lucrative market.
Two years ago, Denmark stopped the adoption of children from Ethiopia.
Lawmakers now say orphans and other vulnerable children should be cared for under locally available support mechanisms in order to protect them.
But some MPs said that the country has insufficient local services to cater for vulnerable children.
More than 15,000 Ethiopian children have been adopted in the US since 1999.
Many are also taken to European countries such as Spain, France and Italy.
What next for Ethiopia's orphans?

Emmanuel Igunza, BBC Africa, Addis Ababa
Debate over foreign adoptions in Ethiopia has been rife since the 2013, so the country's ban didn't come as a major surprise.
The question now is what will happen to the thousands of orphans and vulnerable children who can no longer be adopted?
Parliament says the country's social services should be able to handle the numbers and more importantly local adoptions are still permitted.
However, adoption is not a big part of Ethiopia's culture and many orphans find themselves shuttled between relatives or on the streets.
more on http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-42635641
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top