SkyscraperCity banner

141 - 160 of 302 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Tiya Stones- Sodo- Southern Ethiopia-UNESCO world heritage site since 1980.
Tiya is among the most important of the roughly 160 archaeological sites discovered so far in the Soddo region, south of Addis Ababa. The site contains 36 monuments, including 32 carved stelae covered with symbols, most of which are difficult to decipher. They are the remains of an ancient Ethiopian culture whose age has not yet been precisely determined.
The stelae from the Soddo region, with their enigmatic configuration, are highly representative of an expression of the Ethiopian megalithic period.

Soddo lies to the south of Addis Ababa, beyond the Aouache river. It is remarkable because of the numerous archaeological sites of the megalithic period, comprising hundreds of sculptured stelae, that have been discovered there. The carved monoliths vary in size from 1 m to 5 m. Their forms fall into several distinct categories: figurative composition; anthropomorphic; hemispherical or conical; simple monoliths. In the northern area are to be found stelae with depictions of swords, associated with enigmatic symbols and schematic human figures.

Among the most important of the roughly 160 archaeological sites discovered so far in the Soddo region is Tiya, lying 38 km south of the river, which is also one of the most representative. Roughly aligned over an axis of 45 m there is a group of 33 stelae, with another group of three stelae a short distance from them. Of the 36 stelae at Tiya, 32 are sculpted with vaguely representational configurations (including the sword designs), which are for the most part difficult to decipher. One depicts the outline of a human figure in low relief.
They are the remains of an ancient Ethiopian culture the age of which has not yet been precisely determined. However, they have been interpreted as having a funerary significance, as there are tombs scattered around the stelae.
Upon registration as a world heritage site it was one of the 85 sites to be regarded as a world heritage center back in 1980 although the numbers are 981 at present.
They are the remains of an ancient Ethiopian culture the age of which has not yet been precisely determined but at least a millennium old. However, they have been interpreted as having a funerary significance, as there are tombs scattered around the stelae












 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Shifta Stelae and monolithic funereal tombs- Sidamo Ethiopia
Southern Ethiopia contains few paintings but many rock engravings and carvings including remnants of megalithic cultures in the form of tall phallic monoliths sometimes several metres high and some large anthropomorphic monoliths. The latter are thought to be between 3,000 and 2,000 years old, while other grave-marker monoliths (stelae) decorated with human faces, rams’ horns and geometric designs may date to around 1,000 years. The most important Ethiopian engraving site is Sheppe in the Rift Valley near Lake Awasa. Here large numbers of stylized cattle are carved on the cliffs of a small gorge in bas relief.







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
The designs look's very advanced if not alien. I mean look @ it!!! I don't think their is anything on Earth that comes this close to it's beauty.
The one on the right almost looks like a map of a city.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
36 Posts
it's the Gurages ways of celebrating their deceased milleniums ago. Their is a reason why it was one of the first world heritage centers to be registered by UNESCO. show some respect. don't be a low life :eek:hno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
^^ get lost dude, i cant pretend I like it for political correctness' sake. That dont mean i hate on Gurage, that region is one of my favorite in whole country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
I visited the Amhara region this year and it was truly among the best experiences I've ever had. I truly encourage every single Ethiopian, regardless of faith or ethnicity to visit the entire country. I was completely awed by what I saw. Pictures cannot adequately show how intricate and beautiful all the sites are, but in particular Lalibela. I'm not even religious, but I had tears in my eyes the first time I laid eyes on Lalibela's sites. It takes your breath away to see what humanity is willing to do for something it believes in. The mountains in the region are a site to behold all by themselves. You wouldn't believe how remote the place is. I was wondering where on earth the plane was going to land. There was no flat land anywhere!! It was jagged.

The internet comes and goes so I can't post all my pics, but I'll put up a few of them. I'll do the rest when I get to the US in a couple of months.

The fort is massive. I thought it was going to be a couple of structures and we'd be on our way. Ha! We were in there for a couple of hours looking at ruin after ruin. I was exhausted and dehydrated by the time we left.



Stables on the left, banquet hall on the right:



Interior of banquet hall:



 

·
Moderator
ye Kebele chairman
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
Great stuff abesha, went to Gondar myself cause of family but that was years ago. Sadly have never been to Lalibela, Axum or Harar but Ill make sure to visit those next time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Pentagonal fortress and Town. Medieval Ethiopia recovered.​

It is widely believed that Menelik II discovered Addis in 1881. Where in fact he didn't. He reclaimed it from its lost civilized and glorious days of the center of a developed area Europeans respected as the fief of a mythic alley King, Prester John. Is this, then Barara, the quasi mythical Capital of Abassia or Abyssinia known to European medieval travelers?
The surprise find of a medieval fortress just up from Addis Ababa University, A major one, with twelve towers, loopholes, deep and wide trenches, inner structures. In the context of a whole complex town, easily datable to the XV and the very first years of the XVI centuries, as the consequent decline of Ethiopia and occupation by mainly nomadic Oromos exclude any other more recent origin.
Rock hewn churches, steps, palace bases, and a spring cut in the rock. Ornate stones of all sorts, including an unseen feline head protruding a horrible tongue. Paved roads and wall sided alleys, a residence of Royal standing and dozens and dozens of stones structures. A capital city of Abyssinia, re-discovered, after Minilik claimed discovery in 1881. Re-lost and long forgotten, covered in moss and bush. The missing link between the South expansion of Christianity at the slow fall of Axum and the Gondar Castles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
^^ Very impressive! I hope they fence off the whole area and conserve it properly. Actually, Menelik knew that the area around Addis Ababa was settled by preceding Ethiopian kings when he established his capital there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
Where is it exactly? Is it the Mount Wechacha area that I posted? It probably isn't since those are also walls in ruins, but there are no trees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,558 Posts
^^ Very impressive! I hope they fence off the whole area and conserve it properly. Actually, Menelik knew that the area around Addis Ababa was settled by preceding Ethiopian kings when he established his capital there.
If he knew, why are we just finding this out? Or has it been know for a while?

It's certainly interesting either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Where is it exactly? Is it the Mount Wechacha area that I posted? It probably isn't since those are also walls in ruins, but there are no trees.
No, it's a new discovery by A.A.U students and the Archeology department @ the university of Axum, that's what makes it exiting...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
If he knew, why are we just finding this out? Or has it been know for a while? It's certainly interesting either way.
I read this somewhere, can't recall which book exactly, will let u know if I do. But yeah, one of the reasons Menelik had for settling the area is that it used to be an old imperial settlement. There's also a medieval rock hewn church very close to Addis, within city limits actually I think. Also, the biggest battle during Gragn's invasion was near Dukem, which shows the area around Addis must have been of importance during medieval times.
 
141 - 160 of 302 Posts
Top