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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Rail Baltica is an ongoing greenfield railway infrastructure project to link Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland with a European standard gauge rail line. Its purpose is to provide passenger and freight service between participating countries and improve rail connections between Central and Northern Europe. Furthermore, it is intended to be a catalyst for building the economic corridor in Northeastern Europe. The project envisages a continuous rail link from Tallinn (Estonia) to Warsaw (Poland). It consists of links via Riga (Latvia), Kaunas and Vilnius (Lithuania). Rail Baltica is one of the priority projects of the European Union: Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T).





The railway project will enable intermodality and multimodality (i.e. transportation of freight through two or more methods of transportation). Rail Baltica includes plans for three multimodal freight terminals which will be located in Muuga Harbour (Estonia), Salaspils (Latvia), and Kaunas (Lithuania). This is intended to create synergies with the existing 1,520 mm railway system infrastructure. Seven international passenger stations (in Tallinn, Pärnu, Riga, Riga Airport, Panevežys, Kaunas, Vilnius) with potential regional stations and connections to airports and seaports.[5]

Rail Baltica will be built as a new, publicly owned, fast conventional double-track (quadruple track if the railway will run freight trains) electrified and ERTMS-equipped railway line with a maximum speed of 249 km/h for passenger trains and 120 km/h for freight trains. The new railway line will be designed with a 1,435 mm gauge. Other key technical parameters include the following:

  • The maximum freight train length will be 1,050 m.
  • The maximum axle load will be 25 tonnes.
  • There should be no level crossing with roads and with 1,520 mm railways for the Rail Baltica infrastructure.
  • For maintenance and emergency services, access to the main line should be every 2-3 km and in specific areas.
  • The railway will have ballasted track.
  • Its energy system should be 25 kV.
  • Its double track side should be right-hand running.
  • It is ERTMS (ETCS Level 2, Baseline 3)
Its parameters are in accordance with the EU Technical Specifications for Interoperability (TSI – P2, F1).

The planning phase of Rail Baltica took place from 2010 to 2017. The design phase began in 2016, with design activities at the Riga Central Passenger Station and the Riga International Airport passenger station in Latvia to be continued till 2023. Meanwhile, the construction of the Rail Baltica infrastructure is planned to start in 2019 and should be completed in 2026.

The section from Helsinki to Tallinn will be operated by existing commercial ferries. In the future, a proposed Helsinki to Tallinn Tunnel could provide a rail link between the two cities. The length of the railway between Tallinn and Warsaw will be at least 950 kilometres (590 mi). Total length of the Baltic railway part will be 870 km.







Official website of the Rail Baltica Global Project

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🔼🔼🔼 Originally posted by @Gusiluz:
 

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Final design contracts for Latvian Rail Baltica line awarded IRJ Apr 6, 2020
RB Rail, the body implementing the Rail Baltica project, has awarded two contracts on behalf of the Latvian Ministry of Transport for design and design supervision of the two remaining sections of the Latvian main line.
The contracts, which were awarded to the most economically advantageous bidders, come as Latvia’s transport minister announced that the Rail Baltica project is continuing to proceed despite the Covid-19 pandemic.

Ineco-Ardanuy has been awarded a €13.5m contract for the Vangaži – Latvian-Estonian border section, while Idom has been awarded an €6.9m contract for the Misa – Latvian-Lithuanian border section.

The 94km Vangaži – Latvian-Estonian border section is the longest design section in Latvia, with the design works due to take two-and-a-half-years. According to the preliminary design developed between 2014 and 2016, the section includes 13 bridges, 36 road viaducts, three railway viaducts, 119 culverts and three animal crossings.

The Misa – Latvian-Lithuanian border section is 45km long, with design works due to take two years. According to the preliminary design, the section includes four bridges, 16 road viaducts, four railway viaducts, 54 culverts and one animal crossing.

The two contractors will be responsible for site investigations, value engineering, development of the master design and detailed technical design for construction of the railway track, and author supervision during the entire construction period.

85% of the funding for the design work has been provided by the European Union, with the remaining 15% provided by the Latvian government.

Ineco has already been working with Ardanuy to create the Development of the Rail Baltica Energy Subsystem Procurement and Deployment Strategy.

Idom is currently involved in the detailed technical design of Rail Baltica mainline in two sections in Estonia, two in Lithuania as well as for the mainline section through Riga.

“I am pleased that the implementation of the Rail Baltica project is continuing during this difficult period,” says Latvia minister of transport, Mr Tālis Linkaits. “It is important to increase the design speed so that construction works can be started in Latvia as soon as possible. The active construction phase of Rail Baltica, which will begin at Riga Central Station this autumn, will be one of the factors contributing to Latvia’s economic development and will help to recover from the effects of Covid-19.

“The start of construction work in Latvia will create new jobs and make a significant contribution to the development of construction-related industries. I encourage all companies to actively follow the development of Rail Baltica and participate in future procurements, as the project is progressing regardless of the Covid-19 situation in Europe. The project implementers are working online, and the work is proceeding according to plan.”

“Today we are very pleased to present yet another evidence of progress in the Rail Baltica project implementation,” says RB Rail management board chairperson, Mr Agnis Driksna. “With the signing of the two contracts, design activities are ongoing for the entire Rail Baltica line in Latvia as well as in the two passenger terminals in Riga Central Station and the airport. This means that a total of 643km of the Rail Baltica main line are being designed in all three Baltic States.”

Source: Ineco
 

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A standard gauge railroad tunnel between Tallinn and Helsinki? How long would that be and how likely is that to be built? Also, if this catches on, might we see subsequent proposals for further extensions and/or reconstruction other existing broad gauge lines to standard gauge?

Mike
 

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A standard gauge railroad tunnel between Tallinn and Helsinki? How long would that be and how likely is that to be built? Also, if this catches on, might we see subsequent proposals for further extensions and/or reconstruction other existing broad gauge lines to standard gauge?

Mike
It is about 50 km coast to coast, of course the tunnel will be much longer than that, maybe as much as 80km. But as far as I remember it is all bedrock, so it will be easier to do than the channel tunnel, which is 50km long, but the crossing at this point is only 36km.
As awesome as it would be I do not see it at all. Finland is not the UK, weather you compare population, economy, and so on.
 

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Conversion to standard gauge? Probably not until the end of the century, even assuming it's an advantage. Spain hasn't started yet, 30 years after the first standard gauge HS line opened (Madrid <-> Sevilla, 1992), if I remember correctly there is kind of a plan for some conversions, but nothing serious about the whole network, only where new HS infrastructure is being built (Gusiluz correct me!!!)

I think for the baltic states any discussion will begin only after the completion of Rail Baltica, for Finland who knows.
Finland is currently evaluating an internal green field HS project, it's likely it will be broad gauge due to the travel integration with Russia, but there might be a small chance they evaluate standard gauge (my speculation).
 

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^^ There are no concrete plans or deadlines in Spain beyond those of the EU's TEN-T corridors, and even in these they will only require ERTMS in 2030 and not the gauge change.

Nor do I believe that Finland's export/import capacity by train will make the tunnel necessary; for the time being by ferry and ship.
 

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (continued):

Status
In 2017, all three Baltic parliaments ratified the Inter-Governmental Agreement for the Rail Baltica project, thereby confirming their long-term commitment to the Rail Baltica project. In addition, Rail Baltica Global Project's cost-benefit analysis was delivered by Ernst & Young and Atkins International experts, based on the European Union's CBA guidelines, proving that the project is financially feasible and viable, and its measurable benefits will outweigh the costs.

On 14 February 2018, the Ministry of Public Administration of the Republic of Estonia approved the spatial plan for the Rail Baltica railway in Estonia, leading to the setting of the final route and preliminary design of the railway in this northern Baltic State. The spatial planning for the entire line was approved in Latvia by the decision of the Latvian Government in August 2016, and followed by the approval of the Lithuanian Government in January 2017 for their respective section from Kaunas to the Lithuanian-Latvian border in Lithuania (The route for the section Kaunas–Lithuania/Poland State border, known as Rail Baltica I, is subject to the results of the Upgrade Feasibility study). In the light of Estonia's decision, the spatial territorial planning and preliminary technical design of the Rail Baltica railway in the Baltic States has been finalised.

Map of Rail Baltica with stations:


The Rail Baltica project has entered the design phase in all three Baltic States with the approval of the Detailed Design Guidelines for Rail Baltica, continuing the work on the consolidated preliminary technical design, tendering the detailed technical design services, preparing BIM strategy. On 20 March 2018, the first Rail Baltica construction design and supervision contract of Rail Baltica's Riga International Airport railway station, related infrastructure and viaduct was signed by "Eiropas Dzelzceļa līnijas" SIA and the winner of the open International tender – partnership of suppliers from three countries "PROSIV" ("Sintagma" (Italy), "Prodex" (Slovakia) and "Vektors T" (Latvia)). During the Rail Baltica Global Forum 2018, the project implementers introduced the plans for the Rail Baltica design phase to around 500 suppliers from 24 countries.

In 2018, it is planned to finalise the long-term Business Plan, Operational Plan, the Upgraded Feasibility Study of the European gauge railway line from Kaunas to Lithuanian/Polish border, Infrastructure Management Study and other studies related to commercialisation and supply materials.

Rail Baltica Project Structure


Project implementers
The Rail Baltica project is being implemented by the three Baltic States – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Finland announced in February 2019 that it will also join the project.

The Beneficiaries of the Rail Baltica project are ministries of the three Baltic States – Estonia's Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications, Latvia's Ministry of Transport and Lithuania's Ministry of Transport and Communications. In 2014 they established a joint venture RB RAIL AS to be the Main Coordinator and project implementer for the purpose of completing the railway and developing the Rail Baltica project. Its main business is the design, construction and marketing of the railway. RB Rail AS also submits EU financing proposals for the Rail Baltica purchasing body for all parties for the procurement of studies, plans, designs for the global project, sub-systems (Control, Command, and Signalling and Energy/Electrification), raw materials and key components, and cross-border track sections.

Rail Baltic Estonia OU and the Estonian Technical Regulatory Authority in Estonia, Eiropas Dzelzceļa līnijas SIA in Latvia, Rail Baltica statyba UAB and Lietuvos geležinkeliai JSC in Lithuania are the national Implementing Bodies, to be joined by Finland's Oy Suomen Rata AB subsidiary Rail Baltica Company. All constructon carried out by the implementing bodies is done under the supervision of RB Rail AS and is based on common procurement principles, rules and contract templates.

Financing
The total estimated cost of the Rail Baltica Global project is 5.8 billion euros in all three Baltic States according to the Cost-Benefit Study carried out by EY in 2017.

The Feasibility study of Rail Baltica in the three Baltic States carried out by AECOM in 2011 had estimated cost of 3.6 billion euros for the railway and proved that Rail Baltica is economically viable. Based on that study, key political and practical decisions – both on the national and EU level – were made to implement Rail Baltica.

Since the AECOM study the project has matured, and essential elements have subsequently been added to the Rail Baltica Global Project for better connectivity, passenger mobility and inter-modality. Additions to the Global Project include routing the Rail Baltica passenger mainline through the Riga International Airport and construction of the airport passenger station (Latvia), the Kaunas–Vilnius connection (Lithuania), an improved connection in Kaunas city (Lithuania), and construction of the tram line "Ülemiste-Tallinn airport" (Estonia). Moreover, the Environmental Impact Assessments, spatial planning and some preliminary designs have been prepared allowing to better estimate the investments needed for the project.

Thus, in April 2017, the overall cost of the Rail Baltica Global Project implementation in three countries, including the construction of the Kaunas-Vilnius section, was estimated at about €5.8 billion. According to the Ernst & Young (EY) cost-benefit analysis, the project's economic feasibility and benefits society will gain was proved, providing the necessary updated parameters for continued EU and national co-financing of the project.

The project's profitability lies in its wider socio-economic benefits, which are estimated by EY at around €16.22 billion. In addition, there will be several immeasurable (mostly, catalytic) benefits that would be created by Rail Baltica through regional integration, tourism development, new business creation, increased attractiveness to FDI, access to new export markets, technological transfer, innovation, etc.

The project is financed by the member states and the European Union TEN-T budget, and the Structural and Cohesion Funds provided to the EU New Member States. By the start of 2018, the three Baltic States and RB RAIL AS have received two grants designed under the CEF for the construction of the Rail Baltica railway, having signed Grant Agreements with a total value of 765 million euros. As of 13 July, third Grant agreement was signed for the total amount of 130 million euros from which 110 million euros is CEF contribution.

Financial contributions from CEF and national countries (in millions of euros), July 2018:

In total824
Estonia235
Latvia303
Lithuania286

Route and standard
In 2011, the three Baltic States agreed on a route connecting Tallinn, Pärnu, Riga, Panevėžys, and Kaunas. A feasibility study for this option estimated the line will cost about €3.68 billion in total.

Initially two options were considered. Both options included an upgrade of the existing railway (with standard gauge) to 160 km/h (99 mph) for the stretch that runs from Warsaw via Białystok and Ełk to Trakiszki, followed by a new railway with standard gauge Trakiszki–Kaunas. For the remainder of the route to Tallinn two different options were considered:

  • Option one was to upgrade the existing railway from Joniškis via Riga and Tartu to Tallinn to 160 km/h, keeping the current Russian gauge and state-owned, and a new railway from Kaunas–Joniškis with 160 km/h, also at Russian gauge and state-owned. Because of the break of gauge at Kaunas, passengers would have to change trains there. For freight, a reloading facility or a bogie exchange station would be placed near Kaunas. This option was already completed as Rail Baltica I.
  • Option two was a new railway with 200 km/h (120 mph) speed standard gauge (with 3 kV DC, the same voltage as in Poland) from Kaunas via Joniškis to Riga, as above, but then continuing in a shorter, straighter line via Pärnu to Tallinn. This option was chosen as the preferred route. The existing Lelle-Pärnu line in Estonia was pemanently closed for passenger operations on 9 December 2018, as it required a €17 million refurbishment.
During the planning of the location of the project route in the Baltic States a conceptual agreement among the three Baltic States was reached that it should be as straight as possible as it provides the highest benefits at the lowest cost. The shorter and more direct the route is, the faster traffic it is possible to ensure, which economically has the highest advantage compared to its alternatives. This was confirmed by the AECOM study in 2013, analysing the four possible options of the location of the route in all three Baltic countries.

In 2017, the Parliaments of the three Baltic States ratified the intergovernmental Agreement on Rail Baltica stating "route" shall be from Tallinn though Pärnu–Riga–Panevezys–Kaunas to the Lithuanian/Polish state border with a connection of Vilnius–Kaunas as a part of the railway and defining the design speed 240 km/h for passenger travel. Now the Rail Baltica Global Project route is aligned from Tallinn till Kaunas with already built European gauge railway line section from Kaunas-Lithuanian/Polish border being subject to the results of the Upgrade Feasibility Study. Nevertheless, in April 2018 the Ministries of the three Baltic States approved the Design Guidelines of Rail Baltica, which states that the maximum design speed will be 249 km/h and maximum operational speed should be 234 km/h.
 

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Cost-Benefit Study by Ernst&Young made in 2017:





This doesn't have much to do with it, but it's in the studio and I found it interesting:


It deals with the subject of the tunnel Vuosaari (Finland)-Muuga (Estonia):
For various reasons, the development of a tunnel underneath the Gulf of Finland in recent years has gained considerable political and public support. Even though it is the most expensive alternative, a tunnel would completely remove the Gulf of Finland barrier to enable a fast, sustainable and reliable cargo flow between Finland and Eastern Europe (see Figure 55). In June 2016, the EU INTERREG Central Baltic Programme 2014-2020 allocated one million euros for conducting a feasibility study for the potential tunnel project as it would potentially have a high impact on the areas freight ecosystem. However, due to unclear feasibility and time schedule for this project, for the purposes of the analysis it is expected that the tunnel will not be completed within the life cycle of the Rail Baltica project.
 

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Taken from the official Rail Baltica project page:

Rail Baltica – Project of the Century
Rail Baltica is a greenfield rail transport infrastructure project with a goal to integrate the Baltic States in the European rail network. The project includes five European Union countries – Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and indirectly also Finland. It will connect Helsinki, Tallinn, Pärnu, Riga, Panevežys, Kaunas, Vilnius, Warsaw. The Baltic part of the Rail Baltica project is referred to as the Rail Baltica Global Project.
  • The largest Baltic-region infrastructure project in the last 100 years
  • A 10-year construction period
  • For both passenger and freight traffic
  • Length: 870 km
  • Environmentally friendly – powered by electricity, produces less noise and vibration
  • Max. speed: 249 km/h (passengers), 120 km/h (freight)
  • More than €5 bn investment in the region
  • Implemented by Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania
  • Part of the EU’s North Sea Baltic TEN-T corridor
  • Financed by EU (CEF), Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania
  • Provides intermodality/multimodality
Environmentally friendly
Rail Baltica will be fully electrified so that any emissions will be avoided. The newest technologies and materials are going to be utilized in its construction. The line is planned so that it avoids the Natura 2000 protected areas as far as possible and without significant impact on other environmentally sensitive protected areas. Wherever necessary, noise protection barriers will be installed. Special animal passages will be built through the embankment.
Safe
Rail Baltica will be built according to the most stringent safety requirements. The newest generation of European railway traffic management system (ERTMS) will be used to control the train movement. All crossings with roads and pedestrian pathways will be at two levels. It will be fenced in full length. Passenger stations will have all the necessary facilities in order to make the access to the train services an easy and pleasant experience to anybody.
Modern
Rail Baltica will be built using the most up-to-date technologies and materials. Some of them are still in the process of elaboration, standardization or early stages of commercialization. New intermodal freight terminals will be built in each of the Baltic countries to allow for fast and efficient transfer of containerized cargo between different transport modes. Railway stations will represent the latest developments in the area of multimodal passenger terminals connecting conveniently different urban, regional and long distance services with car and bike parking, shopping and recreative areas.



Rail Baltica – North-South railway axis
The Rail Baltica project is a symbolic return of the Baltic States to Europe – until the Second World War the Baltic States were already connected to Europe with 1435 mm wide. But since the middle of 20th century the Baltic countries have been mainly linked to an East-West railway axis using the Russian gauge 1520 mm rails, reflected in current rail traffic flows. Today most rail freight traffic transported by railway in Baltic states originates from CIS countries, in particular from Russia, and rail transport services are mainly provided on East – West axis using existing 1520 mm gauge system which makes it difficult and costly to interconnect the Baltics with the rest of EU via Poland. Therefore, there is a full consensus on the need to eliminate the Baltic missing rail link of the EU’s North Sea – Baltic TEN-T Core Network Corridor ensuring full integration of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania into the single European railway area.



The Rail Baltica project is one of the priority transport projects of the European Union because it will:
  • Remove bottlenecks
  • Build missing cross-border connections
  • Promote modal integration and interoperability
 

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Detailed technical design and design-supervision services for the construction of the railway substructure, superstructure and related civil structures contracts: contractor, duration, investment (self-compilation):

Connecting branch from Muuga only for freight (out of kilometre count): 50 km Proposal submission deadline for both tenders is May 15, 2018 (???????)

Tallinn-Rapla (Estonia): 48 km IDOM (Spain) 05/2019 24 months 11.4 M €

Rapla-Pärnu: 71 km IDOM (Spain) 03/2019 24 months 6.8 M €

Pärnu-Border: 93.5 km Obermeyer (Germany) and Prointec (Spain) consortium 27 months 10.8 M €

Border-Vangazzi (Latvia): 94 km Ineco and Ardanuy (Spain) 04/2020 30 months 13.5 M €

Vangazzi-Salaspils-Misa river: 67 km Egis Rail (France), DB Engineering (Germany) and Olimps Ltd (Latvia) 06/2018 12.0 M €

Upeslejas-Riga-Misa river: 56 km IDOM and Ineco (Spain) 06/2019 24 months 12.9 M €

Misa river-Border: 45 km IDOM (Spain) 04/2020 24 months 6.9 M €

Border-Ramygala (Lithuania): 91 km IDOM (Spain) 06/2019 24 months 8.0 M €

Ramygala-Kaunas: 78 km IDOM (Spain) 03/2019 24 months 6.9 M €

Connecting branch Vilnius-Kaunas:

Kaunas-Punsk (Polish border):


870 km (643 km designed) and 11 sections: 213 km (213) in Estonia, 265 km (265) in Latvia y 392 km (169) in Lithuania
 

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I'm perplexed about the northern approach to Riga... there is already a railway line running parallel to A4/E77, with possibly some decent space for adding tracks or at least convert to dual gauge, and the bypass could have continued along A4 motorway...
 

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ICEX (a Spanish state-owned public business entity whose mission is to promote the internationalization of Spanish companies) is well aware of the project, as we have seen from the number of Spanish companies involved.

This is what it says about the section between Kaunas and the Polish border on 16 October 2015.

Rail Baltica Global Project in Lithuania and Latvia - Icex

"Difference between Rail Baltica Global Project and the generic Rail Baltica

Until 31 December 2013, the first idea for the project was set out in the 1994 VASAB2010 Vision and Strategies around the Baltic Sea 2010 document adopted at the Conference of Ministers of Spatial Planning and Development in Tallinn (December 1994). The Rail Baltica project was identified as the 27th of the 30 Priority Projects, called "Rail Baltica Axis: Warsaw-Kaunas-Riga-Tallin-Helsinki". AECOM, in its 2011 feasibility study, estimated the cost of the project at 3.539 billion euros.

As of 1 January 2014 the Baltic part (of the three Baltic countries) of the project was renamed Rail Baltica Global Project (RBGP) and is identified as a high-speed European-gauge railway for passengers and freight, linking Helsinki (eventually), Tallinn, Riga, Kaunas, Warsaw (with a section Kaunas-Vilnius), supported by INEA (successor to the TEN-T EA). Currently (2018), the cost of the Rail Baltica Global Project (the section in the three Baltic States) is estimated to reach 5.8 billion euros.

On 10/16/2015 Lithuania opened a section between Kaunas and the border with Poland (119 km for 120 km/h without electrification), presenting it as the first section of Rail Baltica track built. However, RB Rail AS does not accept this section as part of the RBGP project. It is a European gauge line, but a single track (not split), which does not meet the requirements of the RBGP, and therefore the fit of this track into the RBGP and the changes necessary for its conformity are being studied (by Ardanuy, who won the RB Rail AS competition on this subject in 07/2017)."

This is also explained on Rail Baltica's own website.
 

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They are right. How can you complete a new international line in 2015 without electrification, withouth ERTMS, with 120 km/h maximum speed and level crossings? It's not optimal even for freight traffic...
 

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I'm perplexed about the northern approach to Riga... there is already a railway line running parallel to A4/E77, with possibly some decent space for adding tracks or at least convert to dual gauge, and the bypass could have continued along A4 motorway...
At least in appearance, they have first designed Rail Baltica HSR on its way through Riga and now (on 19 February 2020) have started work on a study that will evaluate the most optimal way to integrate the existing rail network and the new Rail Baltica infrastructure into a single, coordinated rail network for Latvia.

Study to explore a single fully integrated railway transport system in Riga node. Rail Baltica website
An international team of experts has started working on a study which will evaluate the most optimal way to integrate the existing railway network and the new Rail Baltica infrastructure in a single and coordinated railway network for Latvia. Taking into consideration that several railway infrastructure projects being developed at the same time as Rail Baltica, such as infrastructure adaptation for the new rolling stock and electrification, the study will propose a clear roadmap for integrated railway infrastructure development for the Riga node.

This study links with the strategic objective of the Latvian Ministry of Transport to increase the share of rail for passenger transportation and to promote the shift of passengers from private cars and busses to trains. Construction of the Rail Baltica infrastructure presents a unique opportunity to expand and modernize the existing railway traffic services to meet the increasing demand for fast, convenient and environmentally friendly transportation services in Latvia.

The study will develop an operational analysis of the Riga railway node for short (2026), medium (2036) and long term (2046) time periods. Research will be conducted by a team of railway engineers and operations experts from Rambøll Denmark A/S and Rambøll GmbH. The study is led by RB Rail AS, on behalf of the Ministry of Transport, in cooperation with partners from SJSC Latvian Railways, JSC Pasažieru vilciens, Road Transport Administration Ltd. and Eiropas Dzelzceļa līnjas Ltd.

According to the Rail Baltica Operational Plan, developed in 2019, the new Rail Baltica infrastructure will be used not only for the high-speed international trains but also for operating new regional train services inside Latvia and regional cross-border services with Estonia and Lithuania. It is planned for the regional trains on Rail Baltica line to travel with the maximum speed of up to 200 km/h. In Latvia, 10 regional stops are planned in the section from Bauska to Salacgrīva. The implementation of regional services using the Rail Baltica infrastructure will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the travel time for people who regularly commute to and from Rīga from the northern and southern regions of Latvia.

The total contract price of the study is EUR 153 596 (excluding VAT) and the results will be delivered in four months. 85% of the cost of this research are funded by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union.
19.02.2020
66782
 

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Operational Plan provides new insights on Rail Baltica international, regional and cargo train movement in 2026-2056. Rail Baltica.org 12.03.2019

"Fast speed trains between the capitals will run every two hours

Rail Baltica high-speed trains from Tallinn to Warsaw and from Tallinn to Vilnius are estimated to run four times per day once the line is launched and up to six times per day within 10 years of operations. Additionally, up to ten trains per day will run on Vilnius-Kaunas-Warsaw route. As a result, Rail Baltica will provide a fast rail connection between the Baltic capitals every two hours.
In addition, the plan includes two night-trains on the route Tallinn-Riga-Kaunas-Warsaw-Berlin and Vilnius-Kaunas-Warsaw-Berlin, enabling passengers to travel further to other destinations in Europe.
Moreover, the passengers will be able to travel by train to Riga International Airport, the busiest one in the region. The travel time will take 1 hour 52 minutes for inhabitants of Tallinn and 1 hour 42 minutes for people from Vilnius. Furthermore, travelers will be able to reach Riga International Airport from the Riga Central Station in around 10 minutes, with minimum one train every 30 minutes.
The frequency of the high-speed trains is based on the anticipated passenger demand, which was assessed in the Rail Baltica Operational Plan for 2026 – 2056. Developed by the German company ETC Gauff Mobility GmbH, in consortium with COWI A/S (Denmark) and Institut für Bahntechnik GmbH (Germany), the plan reflects a modern, integrated approach, where market demand and development is set as the main criteria after which the timetable is defined.
“The main outcome of the operational plan is to indicate how the Rail Baltica infrastructure will meet the transport demand in medium and long term, guaranteeing capacity for all types of train services. This plan will be used to ensure that Rail Baltica track is used efficiently from the first day of its operations and allowing to scale-up passenger and cargo services after the phase-in period,” says Jean-Marc Bedmar, Head of Systems and Operation Department at RB Rail AS.

Cargo trains
According to the plan, 2-3 cargo trains per hour with the maximum speed up to 120 km/h will run on the Rail Baltica line. The estimated axle load of trains is 25 tons and length of trains – 1050m. To facilitate freight movement on the line, three large-scale multimodal terminals are being developed – in Muuga (Estonia), Salaspils (Latvia) and Palemonas (Lithuania).
It is expected that 80% of freight trains on Rail Baltica will be intermodal trains, allowing logistic operators to move the freight from roads to rail, by putting containers and trucks on wagons. Important reduction of the air pollution and road traffic congestion are expected, as well as improvement of the overall road traffic safety.

Regional and cross-border regional trains
The high-level assessment carried out within the Operational Plan reveals a potential of regional train development in all three Baltic states, with maximum speed 200 km/h. This means that Rail Baltica tracks can be used not only for international train services but also for regional and cross-border regional services, bringing the fast and clean transport mode to different locations throughout the whole Rail Baltica corridor.
For example, the plan suggests a sufficient passenger demand to run regional train services from Bauska to Rīga, from Salacgrīva to Rīga (Latvia), from Pärnu to Tallinn (Estonia), and from Marijampole through Kaunas to Vilnius (Lithuania). Furthermore, the plan indicates a feasible demand for regional cross-border traffic, such as from Marijampole to Rīga (Lithuania-Latvia), or from Tallinn to Riga airport (Estonia-Latvia). It should be noted however, that the future of the regional traffic development on Rail Baltica will require additional studies and governmental decisions.

About operational plan
The Operational Plan is based on consolidated studies of passenger and cargo demand for Rail Baltica corridor and defines timetables and types of trains on the line. In addition, the plan includes benchmarked usable rolling stock, indicative locations of infrastructure and rolling stock maintenance facilities as well as detailed track layouts. The main outputs of the Operational Plan will be used for further phases of studies, including the Detailed Technical Design of Rail Baltica infrastructure."



 

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sababa
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If Warsaw to Tallinn is 6 hours and Tallinn to Berlin is 9 hr 40 mins, then they count with 3 hr 40 mins for the Warsaw to Berlin line which is currently around 5 hr 20 mins. Is there any info on this?
 

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Oh look,another RB thread :D If this project sparked interest in you then there are also (more up to date) threads in Nordic & Baltic forums. Here,here and here. ;)

Few bits about stuff happening in Estonian part of RB. Track & route planning has been split to three sections. Two sections are drafted by IDOM and one by Obermeyer Planen + Beraten GmbH & Prointec S.A. Terminal station in Tallinn (in Ülemiste district) is designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (not sure if recent cyberattacks on ZHA servers also delay project planning),terminal station in Pärnu is designed by architecture bureau Pluss. Smaller stations and stops will use generic designs by 3TI Progetti.

There's one highway viaduct U/C in Tallinn metro area,which is linked to RB project and around 10 more viaducts and railway bridges should go U/C in late 2020/2021 across country in preparation for main RB construction.

RB Estonian part will also have 11 regional stations in addition to 2 international terminals and regional train service.

On local municipality level there's push to build out Tallinn ring railway using track corridor allocated to RB project (if you look at Tallinn metro area,then RB already covers 50% of ring railway route) to bypass rail network in Tallinn which in places dates back to 1870s and has throughput problems. Ring railway would be on wide 1520mm gauge and separated from RB tracks. So something along the lines of 2+2 tracks.
 

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If Warsaw to Tallinn is 6 hours and Tallinn to Berlin is 9 hr 40 mins, then they count with 3 hr 40 mins for the Warsaw to Berlin line which is currently around 5 hr 20 mins. Is there any info on this?

Perhaps they count future HSR in Poland. (So called Y line Warsaw-Lodz-Poznan/Wroclaw)

In this case Warsaw-Lodz-Poznan-Berlin

 
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