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Dr.Med. Tom Green
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
... show me your best pics.

You can make as many watermarks in your pics as you want but i want to see why you spend so much money. I want to know if you have this equipment because you are a good photographer or because your parents are rich or you just want to brag.

I know already 2 people who have spend more than 2000€ for there equipment and they can`t take decend pic. One have rich parents, the other one want something to brag.

So let`s see if you only can talk about expensive equipment or if you know how top use it.
 

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to fly
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Money Money

Photography is undoubtedly an expensive 'field' to take up. Equipment can be very expensive depending on its use. The various add-ons to the equipment papparazi often use is thanks to the money (into the thousands) each shot of a 'celebrity' gets.

I and others can tell you that professional photography is not cheap. If one is wanting to get into such a pursuit, it requires money investment. What can be very expensive however is the pricing of professional courses to refine photography skills. A fully comprehensive, three year course, followed up by regular seminars and mastery courses (if desired) can bring costs including equipment to 20-25000 euros if not more, it just depends on what is one's objective.

If someone, who feels rich, decides to splash out on something like that it is a pity that it is not used for what it is intended, a tool to take some of the most beautiful photos in the world.
 

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Gotta lite?
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Tom, I'll try my best to explain this. Of cause, an excellent artist can make fantastic photos from a cheap camera. But there is types of photography that demand something that lowend camera's cannot produce.

A proper DSLR will take photos of far higher "technical" quality than a cheap camera. Better glass and higher quality sensors will yield sharper photos and lower noise. These are vital for professional shooting.

Professional camera's also offer faster response, more manual control and more reliable results. The focus on a Canon 1Ds mark II is far superior to any lower end compact.

When professionals need a tool, a high quality one can be the difference between making the money shot, or walking away with a great but technically unsellable photo.

And it works in so many different aspects. I've been a pro for a couple of years now, and last week I just spent 900€ on a new tripod. €900 may sound too much when you can buy a good one of €50. But they simply are not good enough for what I need. The other night I was out shooting the lightning we had in Frankfurt. I took a number of great shots, some of which I have sold already, but my best shot, an amazing strike over the skyscrapers was ruined by slight blur. The tripod simply wasn't sturdy enough, and with the heavy lens and wind a slight vibration ruined my best shot. That photo alone could have paid for the tripod within a year or less.

So, spending €900 on some steel (actually carbon fiber as carrying all the weight around can get tiring after a few hours) is well worth it.

The new tripod by the way is far more reliable. It's taller, weighs less and more stable. There is less chance now that I will miss the money shots.

It's examples like this that show how important spending money is. If you're serious about photography, and have the money then why not.

But then again, I know what you mean. I was in my local camera shop the other week and in front of me talking to the sales guy was a rich middle aged lady with big plastered blue hair holding the famed €6000 Canon 1Ds II. He was showing her the features but she was babbling on about only wanting to take snap shots of her poodle in auto mode - but insisted on having the best camera. Yes, that is a waste.
 

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I look at it this way, if you can sell photos taken from a point-and-shoot with little to no post processing and do so on a regular basis...you can justify the expense of a DSLR if the time comes about.

I spent about 2600$ back in March on my Nikon D200 with a few extras and already have seen my income from the photos produced go up...how do I keep myself sharp? keep learning and shooting, I'll take anything from a Fashion show to a wedding to allow myself to build up the funds to buy more equipment (I currently have an order pending for 820$)

I'm hardly spoiled but I don't flash my money with other material items that I don't really want...I enjoy shooting and I invest in it.

:cheers:
 

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Dr.Med. Tom Green
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
But then again, I know what you mean. I was in my local camera shop the other week and in front of me talking to the sales guy was a rich middle aged lady with big plastered blue hair holding the famed €6000 Canon 1Ds II. He was showing her the features but she was babbling on about only wanting to take snap shots of her poodle in auto mode - but insisted on having the best camera. Yes, that is a waste.
The worst types of photographers are arrogant people. I hate them the most.

I saw many of them in Frankfurt during the skyscraper festival bragging and showing of there white L lenses.
The guy i met during a meeting from the page where i took party pics was the worst. Owning a 350D with a flash, a f2.8 lens the extra battery. The camera had to look big. He was bragging with his camera. He used the flash in bright daylight just to show of. When he talked with other people about photography he made everyboddy else looking dumb. I couldn`t stand that so i started to talk about photography with him. I knew more so he walked away. I don`t have a problem talking about absolute simple stuff with bloody beginners. I don`t look down on them.

Here is my favorite photographer. I met him in Dubai. He was a guy from Australia. He owns a Hasselblad with 39MP. Hìs equipment included 4 lenses. So he was walking with around 50.000€. He was extreme nice, friendly and he even gave me his camera. He didn`t looked down on me and my small EOS 350D. He also gave me some tips. That`s how a photographer should be.
 

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I know, I know!
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'Way back in the 1960s I was a student on campus at Bloomington, Indiana. I was just beginning to nurture a serious interest in photography, and used to hang out at a little camera shop on Kirkwood Avenue where I could learn a lot about the technical stuff from the proprietor.

A local woman would show up every now and then. Her Cadillac would pull up outside, and her driver would open the door for her and then wait beside the car while she brought her Leica into the store.

The owner would load a roll of Kodachrome, look outside to see what the light was like that day, and make aperture and shutter speed settings for her, using a small-enough aperture that she didn't have to worry about critical focus. She'd go out and shoot up the roll of film, and then come back so that he could rewind and remove the film and send it in for processing. He said it was about a monthly occurrence, depending upon the weather.

I never saw her photos, but I'll bet they were all of her dog(s) or cat(s) or something like that.
 

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I haven't invested yet in a DSLR becouse I'm to lazy to experiment with the manual settings, however my point-and-shoot camera is a good one and with exellent optical zoom Leica lenses (DMC-FZ5), handy for skyscrapers and urban landscape shooting.
 

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oemoemenemoe
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I would never buy products just for status. If anything, a white lens will draws unwanted attention (both from people that go "oeh a big lens" as well as criminals). Thing is, I do buy expensive gear because it allows me to do things I wouldn't have been able to do otherwise (aperture, focal length).


I really needed 10mm for this shot. Simple as that.
 

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He used the flash in bright daylight just to show of.
Fill flash in daylight isn't just for showing off. It's really useful for removing harsh shadows in outdoor portraiture - photojournos and wedding photogs use it all the time.

Fill flash shooting into a sunset:

 

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Dr.Med. Tom Green
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Fill flash in daylight isn't just for showing off. It's really useful for removing harsh shadows in outdoor portraiture - photojournos and wedding photogs use it all the time.

Fill flash shooting into a sunset:

Doesn`t look like bright daylight ;)

Maybe i forgot to write that the flash was absolutly unnecessary in the situations he used the it.
 

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Doesn`t look like bright daylight ;)
The light facing into the sun is pretty bright. :)

Mine was an extreme example (shooting into a sunset usually means a silhouetted foreground or blown background), there's an example of a more typical application here.

Maybe i forgot to write that the flash was absolutly unnecessary in the situations he used the pics.
Yeah, if he was shooting a landscape or a skyline with no close foreground elements, there'd be no use in firing a flash. Like all those people I see firing the flash on their point 'n shoots out of hotel windows or in sports stadiums. :gaah:
 

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skyscraper connoisseur
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Me: I buy quality over quantity. I have dome some paid commercial photoshoot which would just pay off my equipments. I also got multimedia laptop so i can post-process on the go.

There is no way i can work with cheap equipment in low light situations. Absolutely no way. I am just about to invest in a new 14mm f/2.8 lens.
 

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There is no way i can work with cheap equipment in low light situations. Absolutely no way. I am just about to invest in a new 14mm f/2.8 lens.
You've got a problem then.

A cheap 50mm f/1.8 is going to kill your expensive 14mm f/2.8 in low light. (Unless you're shooting on a tripod, in which case even a slow zoom will do the job).
 
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