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Your favourite architectural style(s)?

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Futurist
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What are your favourite architectural styles? This is multiple choice - so you can vote for more than one. There are actually hundreds of different styles; I tried to pick the most well-known ones. I didn't include "Victorian" as such, but rather divided this into the different styles which were prevalent at the time. It will be interesting to see which is most popular amongst SSC forumers. :)




Art Deco

Art Deco was a popular international design movement from 1925 until 1939, affecting the decorative arts such as architecture, interior design, and industrial design, as well as the visual arts such as fashion, painting, the graphic arts, and film. This movement was, in a sense, an amalgam of many different styles and movements of the early 20th century, including Neoclassical, Constructivism, Cubism, Modernism, Bauhaus, Art Nouveau, and Futurism. Its popularity peaked in Europe during the Roaring Twenties and continued strongly in the United States through the 1930s. Although many design movements have political or philosophical roots or intentions, Art Deco was purely decorative. At the time, this style was seen as elegant, functional, and modern.








Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau (French for 'new art'), is an international movement and style of art, architecture and applied art - especially the decorative arts - that peaked in popularity at the turn of the 20th century. A reaction to academic art of the 19th century, it is characterized by organic, especially floral and other plant-inspired motifs, as well as highly-stylized, flowing curvilinear forms.








Baroque

Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. New architectural concerns for color, light and shade, sculptural values and intensity characterize the Baroque. The Baroque played into the demand for an architecture that was on the one hand more accessible to the emotions and, on the other hand, a visible statement of the wealth and power of the Church.








Blobitecture

Blobitecture is a term for a current movement in architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulging form. Though the term 'blob architecture' was in vogue already in the mid-1990s, the word blobitecture first appeared in print in 2002, in William Safire's "On Language" column in the New York Times Magazine in an article entitled Defenestration. Though intended in the article to have a derogatory meaning, the word stuck and is often used to describe buildings with curved and rounded shapes. Examples include the Selfridges building in Birmingham, the Sage Gateshead, London's City Hall, the Eden Project, and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.








Brutalism

Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. The term originates from the French béton brut, or "raw concrete", a term used by Swiss architect Le Corbusier to describe his choice of material. Brutalist buildings are usually formed with striking repetitive angular geometries, and often revealing the textures of the wooden forms used to shape the material, which is normally rough, unadorned poured concrete.








Deconstructivism

Deconstructivism in architecture, also called deconstruction, is a development of postmodern architecture that began in the late 1980s. It is characterized by ideas of fragmentation, an interest in manipulating ideas of a structure's surface or skin, non-rectilinear shapes which serve to distort and dislocate some of the elements of architecture, such as structure and envelope. The finished visual appearance of buildings that exhibit the many deconstructivist "styles" is characterised by a stimulating unpredictability and a controlled chaos.








Futurism

Futurist architecture began as an early-20th century form of architecture characterized by anti-historicism and long horizontal lines suggesting speed, motion and urgency. Technology and even violence were among the themes of the Futurists. In the post-WWII era, futurism, toned down considerably, redefined itself in the context of Space Age trends, the car culture and a fascination with plastic.








Georgian

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1720 and 1840. It is eponymous for the British monarchs George I-IV, who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. Georgian succeeded the English Baroque of Sir Christopher Wren, Sir John Vanbrugh and Nicholas Hawksmoor.

Georgian architecture is characterized by its proportion and balance; simple mathematical ratios were used to determine the height of a window in relation to its width or the shape of a room as a double cube. "Regular" was a term of approval, implying symmetry and adherence to classical rules: the lack of symmetry, where Georgian additions were added to earlier structures, was deeply felt as a flaw. Regularity of housefronts along a street was a desirable feature of Georgian town planning. Georgian designs usually lay within the Classical orders of architecture and employed a decorative vocabulary derived from ancient Rome or Greece. The most common building materials used are brick or stone. Commonly used colors were red, tan, or white. However, modern day Georgian style homes use a variety of colors.








Gothic / Gothic Revival

Gothic architecture is a style of architecture which flourished during the high and late medieval period. It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture. Originating in 12th-century France and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture was known during the period as "the French Style" (Opus Francigenum), with the term Gothic first appearing during the latter part of the Renaissance as a stylistic insult. Its characteristic features include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault and the flying buttress.

Gothic architecture is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and parish churches of Europe. It is also the architecture of many castles, palaces, town halls, guild halls, universities, and to a less prominent extent, private dwellings.

A series of Gothic revivals began in mid-18th century England, spread through 19th-century Europe and continued, largely for ecclesiastical and university structures, into the 20th century.








High-tech

High-tech architecture, or Late Modernism, is an architectural style that emerged in the 1970s, incorporating elements of high-tech industry and technology into building design. High-tech architecture appeared as a revamped modernism, an extension of those previous ideas aided by even more advances in technological achievements. This category serves as a bridge between modernism and post-modernism, however there remain gray areas as to where one category ends and the other begins. In the 1980s, high-tech architecture became more difficult to distinguish from post-modern architecture. Many of its themes and ideas were absorbed into the language of the post-modern architectural schools.








International style

The International style was a major architectural style of the 1920s and 1930s. The term usually refers to the buildings and architects of the formative decades of Modernism, before World War II. The term had its origin from the name of a book by Henry-Russell Hitchcock and Philip Johnson written to record the International Exhibition of Modern Architecture held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 1932 which identified, categorised and expanded upon characteristics common to Modernism across the world. As a result, the focus was more on the stylistic aspects of Modernism. Hitchcock's and Johnson's aims were to define a style of the time, which would encapsulate this modern architecture. They identified three different principles: the expression of volume rather than mass, balance rather than preconceived symmetry and the expulsion of applied ornament.








Neoclassical

Neoclassical architecture was an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. In its purest form it is a style principally derived from the architecture of Classical Greece.








Postmodern

Postmodern architecture was an international style whose first examples are generally cited as being from the 1950s, and which continues to influence present-day architecture. Postmodernity in architecture is generally thought to be heralded by the return of "wit, ornament and reference" to architecture in response to the formalism of the International Style of modernism. As with many cultural movements, some of postmodernism's most pronounced and visible ideas can be seen in architecture. The functional and formalized shapes and spaces of the modernist movement are replaced by unapologetically diverse aesthetics: styles collide, form is adopted for its own sake, and new ways of viewing familiar styles and space abound.

Modernist architects regard post-modern buildings as vulgar and cluttered with "gew-gaws". Postmodern architects often regard modern spaces as soulless and bland. The divergence in opinions comes down to a difference in goals: modernism is rooted in minimal and true use of material as well as absence of ornament, while postmodernism is a rejection of strict rules set by the early modernists and seeks exuberance in the use of building techniques, angles, and stylistic references.








Structural Expressionism

Structural Expressionism is a style of modernist architecture in which the core structural elements of the building are expressed in the building's appearance. The style has been around since at least the 1960s, but it did not become popular and widespread until the 1980s. Like Brutalism, Structural Expressionist buildings reveal their structure on the outside as well as the inside, but with visual emphasis placed on the internal steel and/or concrete skeletal structure as opposed to exterior concrete walls. The style's premier practitioners include the British architect Norman Foster, whose work has since earned him a knighthood, and Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, known for his organic, skeleton-like designs. Buildings designed in this style usually consist of a clear glass facade, with the building's network of support beams exposed.


 

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I voted for the international style and within that, the early modernism of Gropius, Le Corbusier, the De Stijl group etc., associated with it. (I'd argue what became known as the International Style was much more corporate and associated with people like Mies and Johnson in the 50s and 60s.)

Other styles that particularly appeal to me include constructivism, brutalism, futurism and high-tech architecture.
 

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Advance Kingstonia!
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I voted Deconstructivism.

There is nothing better than looking at a building and being completely blown away by awkward impossible geomotry and quirky detail.

It's even better when the form is used to allow the design to compliment older, treasured buildings whilst simultaneously looking mindbogglingly NOW.

Like this in central Prague:

 

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Couldn't possibly choose, I love them all the different styles, just like I love all the different ladies.
 

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Voted Georgian.

You missed off Zoomorphic by the way :) Architecture designed to look like something, i.e. The Spinnaker Tower, Eastside Plaza (Portsmouth), that random elephant building. Even, perhaps with some arguement, although not Shuttleworths intent, the Gherkin.
 

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Épater la Bourgeoisie
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Im a big fan of Art Nouveau and Gothic Revival.

I cannot believe there are people who like Brutalism.Brutalist buildings were designed by enemies of the human race and therefore should be demolished.
 

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Épater la Bourgeoisie
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Said I.

You do remind me of those 'architects' in Octomans article in Robin Hood Gardens thread : all for demolition of old buildings but when its some modernist crap under threat you start pulling your hair out in anger and screaming 'philistines'!
Brutalist buildings have no aesthetic merits whatsoever and are a scar on the face of our cities.
 

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voted for futurism

although my favourite skyscraper will probably always be the modernist twin towers of the world trade center. i visited as a child and will never forget looking up, in awe of it's sheer minimal facade.

thanks for creating this excellent resource wjfox, i learnt a lot.
 

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Trainee Apprentice MOD
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I Love so many styles, but who can argue that the georgian proportions are startlingly beautiful, and well just right? Gothic revival has a presence I adore. I wish we had more art nouveau though.

Art deco produced so many wonderful designs, and deconstructivism can be wonderfully expressive, and chaotic. The cancelling of the Libeskind spiral was upsetting for me.

Golden:



Missed opportunity:
 

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ONE WORLD
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Art Nouveau all the way baby! It combines all the best of challenging the set ideals such as the use of assymetry, organic form, exotic foreign influences such as Japonisme, Islamic and Chinoiserie, and machine-like repetition of motifs (thus reflecting everything about the new century in relief of the past century) - but with all the style, pizazz and intricacy of an ornate and decorational building (now long gone in todays styles), which proved to be its downfall. Every building just had too much work involved.

Some crtics say the new architecture nowadays such as the Bilbao Guggenheim is merely a modernist rebranding of Art Nouveau.

Also very rare.
 

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ONE WORLD
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:drool:

This is just so aesthetically pleasing, the organic flow offset with the human, metal construct:



the challenges and workmanship on a simple door:



and the avant garde forms:




and the detailing:



use of colour at times, with gold leaf popular:



so very decorational and painstaking work:



sublime floodlit interiors:





challenging use of assymmetry:




...and finally just the fact its so decadent, what I call hand made, organic, decorated modernism

 

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Épater la Bourgeoisie
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^ Im not sure thats Art Nouveau it looks like your typical Victorian boozer.

Whitechapel Gallery and Bishopsgate Institute are the only Art Nouveau buildings in London I can think of.
 

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I'm up for anything decadent and over indulged (ie lots of gold and spangly bits) so Baroque, Decon and Art Nouveau all come high up my lit. :) TBH as an architecture student, I love them all for their variety, thats why my subject is so much better than all the other (crappy) arts.
 

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btw wjfox,

That pic representing georgian architecture is a crap example - i would go for something neo palladian like the work of Wood Elder and Younger in Bath, or that of lord burlington. Georgian architecture was all about the combination of proportion and detail and the restraint in adornment in the pursuit of harmony.

Also for futurism i would probably select something more representative of the enthusiasm in the new and exciting forms being made possible for the first time - probably the TWA terminal by Eero Saarinen
 

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^ Im not sure thats Art Nouveau it looks like your typical Victorian boozer.

Whitechapel Gallery and Bishopsgate Institute are the only Art Nouveau buildings in London I can think of.
it's art nouveau but you can't tell so much until you get closer and see the details and interior:





also noticed this:


is the bibendum building in chelsea arts nouveau?

anyway london is better for arts and craft of which there are many examples.
 
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