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Flinders Street, Collector's Melbourne

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Flinders Street, Marvellous Melbourne

From east-end to west-end
Part 1



























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Great to be taken on a fresh tour of Flinders Street Collector - I had never seen that big bird-house sculpture, or whatever it is.

You're such a lovely, lovely, modest and considerate fellow - why don't you post some of these great photos BIG?

This one (and the old HWT, for example) would look spectacular in larger size: go on. DO IT!

Yay! Mathew would be proud.

Bronte; that's a pigeon roost. It's purpose is to give the pigeons somewhere to spend the night so they don't end up crapping all over buildings and statues of once important people.
Nice photos.

Is this a flying fox sanctuary? Goes well with the name of the park :laugh:

^^ Read previous post by gappa.
You're such a lovely, lovely, modest and considerate fellow - why don't you post some of these great photos BIG?

go on. DO IT!
Nah, I'm too modest.
Festooned lighting on Flinders Street Station in 1954 to celebrate the centenary of Victorian Railways and also the 1954 Royal Visit.



The now demolished Yarra Family Hotel at the north-west corner of Flinders and William Streets, December 1959.

:eek:kay: great shots :)
Some great old postcards of Flinders Street, enjoy! :)











Again re-posting from 'Old Days All Cities for the record and Collector's wonderful street threads: from Stuart Bremer's book 'City Life,' the newsstand at Flinders Street Station in the 1950s:

Flinders Street Station
Below are images of this Edwardian Baroque masterpiece throughout its history.



The original Flinders Street Station.



Above and below, the current Flinders Street Station built between 1905-10.





Photograph taken in 1946 on a rainy day.



The Ballroom.



Flinders Street station decorated for the Victorian Railways Centenary and royal visit.



Recent postcard showing that the triangular pediments on top of the Flinders Street entrances have been removed.



An Edwardian postcard showing the Elizabeth Street entrance to Flinders Street station with pediments.
Below a recent photograph I've taken of Flinders Street Station from Elizabeth Street, clearly showing the missing triangular pediments on both sides of the clock tower.



Two more of my own.



West end of station, Flinders Street.



The clock tower.

Two more old postcards.



Three more recent photographs of mine.







Below, Flinders Street Station appearing on a Met Ticket.

Festooned lighting on Flinders Street Station in 1954 to celebrate the centenary of Victorian Railways and also the 1954 Royal Visit.



The interior of the large dome.



What could have been if the roof over the platforms was ever completed.



Flinders St Station
Melbourne’s Taj Mahal

Marc Fiddian
Galaxy Print and Design
First published in 2003

In print

Whether it’s a packed station or an empty station, there’s something to stir the memory at Flinders St railway station. While essentially a station serving the suburban network, it nevertheless ranks as one of the world’s great railway terminals.

Pocket size and although the photographs could have been printed better, the book is well researched.
Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Former State Theatre (now Forum)
150-162 Flinders Street, corner Russell Street

This wildly exotic structure, replete with an ‘Arabian nights’ façade and onion domed tower, was the flagship of the Union Theatre chain and was Australia’s largest silent era picture palace, seating 3370.
Executed by the local architects Bohringer Taylor & Johnson, the design was provided by American theatre specialist John Eberson in his distinctive ‘atmospheric’ style, where the interior is designed to give the impression of a walled Florentine garden, complete with artificial night sky studded with stars, surrounded by statuary (mainly sent out from Eberson’s Boston workshop).
It was built in a race with the equally sumptuous Regent Theatre in Collins Street, and opened first by three and a half weeks in February 1929. Renamed the Forum in 1962 when the balcony was subdivided off to form a second cinema, it became a Revivalist Church in the 1980s, and in the late 1990s became a mixed entertainment venue.

How it looked in the 1930s.



The Forum at night.



Several shots of my own.







From Walking Melbourne, The National Trust Guide to The Historic and Architectural Landmarks of Central Melbourne.

Commercial Travellers Association Hotel (now Rendezvous Hotel)
318-332 Flinders Street

The prolific H W & F B Tompkins won the competition for this building, which was completed in 1913. It was built to accommodate the once ubiquitous traveling salesman, conveniently near the railway station, and incorporated numerous grand spaces and facilities, such as the impressive domed entry hall, and large columned billiard and dining rooms (sadly now subdivided into hotel rooms). The façade, clad in striking white glazed bricks, is a successful combination of the Commercial Palazzo with the exaggerated details of the Edwardian Baroque. The hotel was built up to the 132 ft height limit in anticipation of its coming into force in 1916, but the left half of the building (built as offices) only rose to the 5th level – the upper half was built (completing the original design) in 1997 as part of extensive refurbishment required after 20 years of abandonment.

In the old photograph below, taken shortly after it was built in 1913 we see the Commercial Travellers Association Hotel second from left.



A postcard of the interior Reading Room.



Three of my own below showing the now completed building.





What could have been if the roof over the platforms was ever completed.

i don't think i was ever aware that this had been planned. Fantastic - I've always liked that European sweeping glass cavern style over the rail platforms.

Ranks with the undone dome on the Parliament for one to be finished imo!.
i don't think i was ever aware that this had been planned. Fantastic - I've always liked that European sweeping glass cavern style over the rail platforms.

Ranks with the undone dome on the Parliament for one to be finished imo!.
Agreed. I've always thought it looked a little awkward given the bad symmetry. I'd like the Swanson st side to completed (shouldn't be that hard using fairly cheap material which would just be painted over anyways), however i think the glass cover over the platform may be a little too much to ask.

btw as always great photos collector!
From Walking Melbourne, The National Trust Guide to The Historic and Architectural Landmarks of Central Melbourne.

Herald Building
44-74 Flinders Street, corner Exhibition Street

This impressive building was designed by the prolific H M & F W Tompkins, and built in stages between 1921-28, expanding along with the Herald newspaper empire, controlled by Keith Murdoch (later Sir, and Rupert’s father). The daily afternoon tabloid The Herald and many other publications were printed here until 1996. The solid composition, featuring giant abstracted classical columns, topped by a rooftop neon sign and twin radio towers, dominates the corner and conveys an image of the power of the print media in the pre-TV era.
Following protracted controversy, all except about 20m depth of the building on both streets was demolished in 2004, to allow a large office tower designed by Denton Corker Marshall to rise behind.

Two of my own below.



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