SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
City leaders and Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum officials continue to meet and work with the National Football League over a lease agreement and other issues related to getting an NFL team in the historic Exposition Park venue. However, the league is also meeting with Anaheim representatives. Coliseum plans call for spending upwards of $400 million to convert the facility into an NFL-suitable stadium by reducing the 92,500 seats to 78,000. The renovation would create 200 luxury suites, club level seating, new locker rooms, restrooms and concession areas. Although NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue has stated that he wants the league to return to Los Angeles by 2010, a decision on a local stadium could be delayed as the owners seek to negotiate a collective bargaining agreement with the players' association. That issue continues to drag.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The Los Angeles billionaires who want to be National Football League team owners can't understand why public funds or subsidies are so hard to come by to bring a team here. It's happened before. They remember when the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles and were given millions of dollars worth of improvements to Chavez Ravine and surrounding areas to clear the way for Dodger Stadium.

In fact, the Coliseum itself, where the NFL wants a new Los Angeles team to play, was the first large-scale stadium in America that was built with public money, in a successful effort to lure the '32 Olympic Games.

But the political landscape has changed.

At an April press conference declaring Los Angeles the place for the next NFL team, even NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue noted: "We all understand the reality of taxes in California since someone named Jarvis came on the national scene." Residual attitudes from the tax revolt Howard Jarvis helped foster have local politicians from the mayor on down declaring that no new taxes will go toward refurbishing the Coliseum for the NFL.

Beware of politicians bearing dictionaries. We are now hearing that there would be no "net" increase in taxes. That argument goes like this: Public money invested in the Coliseum and surrounding area will more than pay for itself with an increase in the economy, which will pay back the invested public dollars to public treasuries. Exactly when, or if, such a payback would occur is uncertain.

Economist Raymond Keating, writing for the Cato Institute about whether local economies show improvement due to new sports stadiums, states, "Nothing is actually added to the area's economy; instead leisure spending and activity are merely shifted around."

A spate of studies has been inconclusive in measuring the importance of a pro franchise on a local economy. But, here's some empirical evidence to chew on: After the Raiders and the Rams left the greater Los Angeles area, the economy still boomed.

The NFL wants to sweeten the pot for the Los Angeles bid by offering a $150-million loan for stadium renovation. But, NFL guidelines dictate that such a contribution can only be made if public funds are invested as well.

With the combined assets of the Los Angeles billionaires who want to own the team, it would appear that there would be enough private money to renovate the stadium and add parking facilities. But, the NFL is not interested in just making a deal with rich owners. The NFL motto is: Show me the money. Public money, that is.

NFL owners have a couple of reasons for wanting to make sure public money is included in the deal. If taxpayers pick up some of the financial burden for stadium reconstruction, NFL owners assume they can get a larger franchise fee from the Los Angeles billionaires to buy into the league, fattening the existing team owners' wallets. That means, to be parochial about it, in the end, taxpayer money would not be subsidizing our billionaires but some out-of-city rich guys.

Another reason the NFL owners would hate for Los Angeles to deny public funds is that it would end a trend of having public dollars support multimillionaire sports owners. If Los Angeles, a coveted market, can acquire a team without spending public dollars on a stadium, it would send a message across the country that the NFL owners wouldn't like.

To avoid local entanglements, the prospective Los Angeles owners have persuaded the governor to get involved in negotiations. Will state funds, in one form or another, help close the deal?

We ought to know any day.

But public money from any source doesn't belong in this rich persons' club. Certainly, these new stadiums are not built with the general public in mind. A recent story about the new Los Angeles Staples Center sports arena noted that only the privileged who can afford suites and sky boxes will be permitted to luxuriate in the posh restaurants and private lounges.

Transferring the debate to a different level of government is an attempt to move the decision away from local passions, although it's hard to imagine that voters in San Francisco, Stockton and Eureka will be pleased with the idea that state money will subsidize an L.A. team.

How far will the owners move this quest for public moneys to avoid local resistance? The overflowing federal budget surplus makes one shudder.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
interesting pictures. If the Colleseum gets rebuilt, you folks in LA will be a lot luckier than we were in Chicago with Soldier Field. Unlike Soldier Field, the Colleseum was so constructed that it could be built outward without affecting the integrity of the stadium's exteror. As many of you know in Chicago, we didn't have that option and had to do some strange configuation to fit the stadium in over the collonades. Looks like in LA you can combine the past and the future far more seamlessly with what you have to work with.

Would the Bruins ever consider returning to a rebuilt Colleseum or do they like having a stadium they don't share with SC too much to even contemplate going back?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I don't think they should have a team play in the old coliseum for the fact it's
not enough parking and you have gangs all over that area. I think thats why they are trying to raise the price of housing to push the poor in the valley so the people with money can return to south LA. I heard a story about this plan one day and when you look at it some parts of it is taking place already.
You might see a reversal of white flight soon in south LA as the valley becomes more affordable your going to see more middle class blacks and hispanic and asian families more there because prices in south LA are rising.
These new homes I seen on western blvd. in south LA are going for 500,000 and not many minorities can afford that. My former neighbors when I lived in south LA recently sold their home for 400,000 and this is south LA not san fernando valley where I stay now and is about to move out of I already have a cool home in the Atl also but I'm about to leave california forever but thats another topic. But I don't think they will bring a team here until they force the poor out of south central and they are already doing that now by raising prices. I really feel for the poor because california is getting crazy nowdays with these crazy prices.
 

·
Silver Lake
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Oh, swat my tanned hide! Will you please stop portraying California and LA in particular as just steps away from an apocalyptic nightmare. As if the Da Vinci Code is unraveling right before our very eyes in Jefferson Park. From west coast hip hop's perceived death to all of the *****s, ******** and chinx being rounded up onto the Expo line and sent to the valley(which actually has a veiled resemblance to Auschwitz) to why aint the latina sisters dating the "black" bros. Things change son. New immigrants move in. You adjust or you move some place else. I mean once that wall goes up and we start importing people from Thailand who will work at half of what Lupita is working for, you will witness yet another change. When taco stands are being converted into quick and easy kai kon on the go, I guess I'll be talking to "cholobro" on his lamentable exit to the promised land of San Antonio.

Such is life.
So, please move to the ATL and get cruncked as soon as you get there! It's ridiculous to LA bash in the LA forum. It's ok to have an opinion but you're going left of left with your Cosbian blame the blamed game. IF you really want to move to a state that up until 2001 had the Confederate flag(might of well been a swastika) on its state flag and seal, so be it!

But California has many times been first in social and civil rights change.

Peep this.
In 1948 California was the first state to strike down interracial marriage laws which banned the practice. It took over 30 years for states in the south to follow suit, and only by the power of the US Supreme Court. One of the first to inact Affirmative Action programs, housing(covenant) law restrictions and so forth.

California has been "very good" to blacks compared to other places of emigration such as the northeast where they had to endure the prejudices of European immigrants who themselves were discriminated against. Housing laws were even better out here, I mean Chicago was hell for a black person to find decent housing even if they did have the money. In fact, imo Chicago is still very much segregated. And then their was the South. California was thought to be the great American melting pot, where race was submissive to character and anything was possible. Although reality came crashing down upon us during the Watts uprisings, it was still better than the South where you couldn't even enter a white-owned store through the front door and an uprising in 1965 would have been surely met with mass slaughter. So please stop trippin'!

The South might hold wonderful opportunities for blacks now, and I think that's great. But many of the blacks that are returning are coming back from places that allowed them to get a leg up in the first place. Brothers and sisters are selling their homes in View Park for a cool mill and moving back and buying up plantations that their great great grandparents worked on. But in many instances(not all) they had to leave first.
I would have liked to have known the outcome if their grandparents didn't have the strength and will to move away from the centerpiece of America's racist hostility towards the black man to begin with.

I mean for a discussion on a friggin' football stadium to be turned into a spotlight on the social ills of LA is uncalled for and completely ridiculous. It's almost starting to sound like you are leaving LA because you couldn't make it here.
 

·
Shaken, never Stirred
Joined
·
8,014 Posts
Way to go (K).......

Like I mentioned on a previous thread to (Soul). It just seems you need some friends or bottom line a shrink because you have issues. I always said he seemed bitter based on what he talks about. So (Soul) do yourself a favor and get laid......... That might actually help you out!!!!!
 

·
Silver Lake
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Good news!
 

·
Silver Lake
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
I just saw what Anaheim is proposing as far as stadiums. It's another fake ass instant urban behemoth, sort of like The Grove on steroids. I started to think what LA is offering and w/o question why the Coliseum is not only the best choice but the logical choice.

LA is offering a historic stadium that has seen 2 Olympics.

Placed in an urban landscape that doesn't have to be created perhaps just revitalized.

Adjacent to a top university, great diverse museums, downtown that will soon host LA Live a sports themed entertainment complex, multi-freeway access and (something that Orange county can't even begin to get its head wrapped around), a new mulit-million dollar rail line with a stop near the stadium. The ethnic diversity of the area within say a 5 mile radius is astounding. You probably have over 20-25 languages and dialects being spoken. And also a nexus of class diversity. Remember its the working class man/the working poor who keep this industry afloat. Attending all of the home games and buying up all of the useless paraphenelia. And then ironically within the same 5 mile radius you have some of the richest people in the world as well. Why haven't they made a decision?

Why is this a hold-our-breath decision??? It's clear! It will be a shame for them to choose a spot and have it be Orange county. The Coliseum has so much more history, so much more life, right in the middle of one of the largest urban centers in the world. Why is this even being debated?

Orange County=Wonder Bread and Jiffy Pop.
Expo Park=Multi-grain and homemade Kettle corn
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top