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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a thread for the retail and mall-oriented facets of urban construction. I can't be the only person on this forum that relishes a day spent at the stores, whatever ilk, calibur or price range they may be. This is a place to discuss all of the retail- or mall-oriented projects in our respective cities, whether to brag, question, compare and contrast, etc. like in most of the existing topics.
Since I'm starting it, I'll begin with my favourite retail-related projects future, ongoing or completed:

-Midtown Charlotte is seeing some very interesting projects, in both the area officially designated as Midtown, and other inner-ring neighborhoods bordering the CBD area such as South End. This year has seen the nearly-complete demolishing of the old Midtown Square shopping complex (Formerly Charlottetown Mall, the first enclosed mall in the Carolinas) so far, and once it is all down the rebuilding will be grand. Along with a condo mid-rise and a possible hotel high-rise (I'm not sure what parts of that have been confirmed), an urban-design Target will be built on top of an urban-design Home Depot Expo Design Center. Here is a link to a rendering:
Midtown Project
Also in Midtown, the new Elizabeth Avenue project includes the much sought-after Whole Foods market, which will open in 50,000 square feet in one of the many mid-rises on the six-block redevelopment site. Along with the defunct, non-urban buildings that are being razed to make way for this project, the roads that run through it are being redesigned to accomodate stone foothpaths at intersections and a streetcar running between Presbyterian Hospital and Central Piedmont Communitty College. Here is a link to a rendering:
Elizabeth Avenue Vision
Also, in the works for Southend is an urban-design Lowe's, which will have parking on the top and be wrapped by condos. And I can't confirm this at all but I've seen in several places that it may be three stories tall. Now THAT would be awesome. Unfortunately, as far as I know no renderings exist at this time.

-As for luxury retail, Southpark Mall is currently in the process of adding a Neiman Marcus department store and several luxury boutiques to its already stellar lineup (many of the following boutiques have no duplicates in all of NC) that includes Louis Vuitton, St. John, Burberry, Coach, Tiffany's, Swarovski Crystal, Anthropologie, Leonardo, Frontgate, Steve Madden, Mont Blanc, Kate Spade, Tumi, and its other department stores, Nordstrom, Belk, Hecht's and Dillard's, a semi-upscale Dick's Sporting Goods anchor, and Joseph-Beth, an upper-echelon bookstore with a small Bistro-type eatery within.
While the latter three department stores mentioned (and Dick's as well) are not usually upper-income names by any stretch, their location in the Carolina's premier luxury shopping destination has warranted that they bring the quality of those stores above and beyond their respective brand's traditional, more everyman image. The Belk Southpark is 336,000 square feet on four complete levels and features luxury goods in most all of their departments. There is a Chanel makeup station in the cosmetics area, the housewares section sells Versace china, and there is a presence of such brands in the store as Burberry, Garfield & Marks, Coach, etc.
The Dillard's, currently in the process of a remodel and 50,000 square foot expansion, is almost 300,000 sq. ft. on three levels and sells brands such as Polo Ralph Lauren in their very large perfume and cologne departments that cover the better of one whole floor.
The Hecht's, in the process of a conversion to the Macy's name, is only in the neighborhood of 230,000 sq. ft. (give or take 55,000, not sure of the exact square footage) on two levels, but features a complete furniture department, something few Hecht's can boast.
The Dick's Sporting Goods store outparcel connected to the mall by a walkable plaza, also not a high-end store, is more upscale than most of that brand as well, as it was intended to be a Galyan's before the chain was acquired by Dick's. Its exterior is modeled after the traditional Galyan's look, and even includes the well-known Galyan's staple of a climbing wall inside.
The mall also features such upper-crust restaurant staples as Morton's, McCormick & Schmick's, Maggiano's Little Italy, The Cheesecake Factory and California Pizza Kitchen, along with some good mini-restaurants inside several of its anchors, including Arthur's in Belk and the Nordstrom Cafe and Nordstrom eBar.
But the best is yet to come: The stores coming to the new Neiman's wing have been confirmed as including Hermes, Polo Ralph Lauren, and my personal favourite- BCBG Max Azria, the luxury grandaddy of BCBG that has been seen on more stars and actresses at Hollywood premiers than Prada shoes and Jimmy Choo bags (Both of which are already carried, albeit in small displays, in the Bob Ellis Shoes boutique in Southpark).
The upcoming NM wing's tenant lineup is also rumored to include one or two from the following (since, after the confirmed ones, space limits allow no more): Cartier, Armani A/X, Club Monaco and/or Sisley. (If I carry on on the previous section, I apologize... I love luxury shopping, and I love the fact that Charlotte has so many luxury stores already and is getting more and more, despite the fact that it is only a mid-sized city.)

I'm open to hearing all about the retail construction, presence and general prowess of all other cities in the SE. Post away.
 

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Southpark sounds great I've never been there. I live in Houston and our best mall is The Galleria also the fourth largest in the country. Anchors include Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Nordstrom
Macy's, and Foley's. The Galleria is known for its upscale stores that include Giorgio Armani, Christian Dior, Fendi, Stuart Weitzman, Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, Barney's CO-OP, Bally of Switzerland, Gucci, Cole Haan, Jimmy Choo, Louis Vuitton, Bulgari, David Yurman, Gianni Versace, Kate Spade, Burberry, Movado, Salvatore Ferragamo, CH Carolina Herrera, Cartier, among a lot more. It also boast of having some of the largest stores in Texas and some in the whole country Saks is the second largest after its NYC flagship, Neiman Marcus is also the second largest, Louis Vuitton is a Global Store wich means it carries everything Vuitton offers one of only a few world wide, just to name a few. A lot more upscale stores will open this year with the recent construction going where Lord & Taylor was the mall is turning 150,000 sq ft into more upscale stores and restaurants set to open winter 2006.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've always wanted to go to the Galleria. I knew that it had over 350 stores of a very upscale nature, but I didn't know even the magnitude of the individual stores was of world-calibur. Southpark has a Cole Haan, but I guess I didn't consider it luxury enough to warrant putting it in my post (Plus, the Southpark CH is a women-only store, an experiment CH is doing, which makes it completely unique but also not as diverse in merchandise lineup). I can't figure out why Southpark doesn't have a Saks or a Versace boutique yet, with all of the stores I mentioned to its credit. And I'm sure the Galleria has even more high-end choices in the surrounding district named for it.

I've never been to a Foley's, though, they don't have them in NC. What's it like, in store design and merchandise?
 

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Foley's is the same store as Hecht's. They are owned by the same company. I think though they all changing to Macy's because of the merger btw May Dept store and Federated Stores.
 

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Let's try some URBAN retail here, shall we?

Straight from the original capital of Carolina

Welcome to upper King, a reborn shopping mecca

BY CAROLINE FOSSI
The Post and Courier

When Cathy Spencer first visited downtown Charleston's design district, it instantly stirred memories of New York City's eclectic shopping areas.

"It feels like Greenwich Village or SoHo," she said of the upper King Street district. "It's just fun, vibrant."

The area's artsy, Big Apple aura convinced Spencer and her husband that it was the perfect spot for their new high-end furniture store, Coastal Classics, which opened last month at 511 King.

The shop is among dozens of upscale and hip businesses that have opened in the rapidly evolving district in recent years. They join a dwindling number of moderately priced shops that have survived in an area that once drew shoppers from across the Lowcountry before suffering a period of decline.

Today, the district is enjoying a rebirth and gaining local and national attention as a hub for design-related businesses such as home-decor shops, clothing stores and interior design houses. It's expected to attract even more new businesses, and shoppers, on completion of a street beautification project now under way.

The area's growing cachet hasn't happened by chance. Local merchants have been working to promote it, with efforts including twice yearly "design walks" - evening open houses inviting visitors to peruse the district's shops and nibble on appetizers. The next walk is Thursday.

The event started in 2001 with four shops and has grown to include more than 20 businesses in the area between Calhoun and Spring streets.

"It's a shopping night," said Leigh McAlpin, a design-walk organizer and co-owner of the Dwelling home furnishings store at 474 King. "The emphasis is on seeing what's new and what's hot."

To further raise awareness of the district, a group of design-oriented upper King businesses has been working on a marketing flier detailing the district's charms. The area, the flier says, has become "a home decorating destination that rivals major markets nationwide."

This sort of cooperative spirit is one reason Eve Blossom decided to open a fabric business on upper King in 2003.

"It's such a positive energy," said Blossom, owner of Lulan Artisans, which specializes in hand-woven fabrics and decorative accessories.

An architect who has lived in such far-flung spots as Vietnam and Russia, Blossom said she's impressed by the district's growth. "Everybody's jumping on the bandwagon."

Indeed, the area now boasts businesses ranging from off-beat boutiques to high-profile national tenants such as Waterworks, M. Craig & Co. Cabinetmakers, Maine Cottage and California Closets.

But for all its growth, upper King still doesn't get the foot traffic enjoyed by retailers along King Street's mid-section, long the prime downtown shopping area. That's good, say some upper King merchants, who like the district's word-of-mouth coolness factor.

"Middle King is the obvious area for retail," said Andrea Serrano, co-owner of B'zar, an urban streetwear boutique at 541 King. "We wanted to be in an area where people would search us out."

That said, more shopping crowds could be on the way.

In addition to the streetscaping project, a number of future developments are expected to boost traffic along upper King. They include a hotel proposed for the site next to Marion Square where the county's old main library now sits, and the Morris Square development, a trendy neighborhood under construction at nearby Morris and Coming streets. Also in the vicinity is the new and expanding Charleston School of Law.

New flavors

Upper King also has become a popular dining and nightlife destination, home to an array of eating and drinking spots. Among the newer arrivals are O'Malley's Bar and Grille, an Irish-themed sports bar and restaurant; Raval, a Spanish wine bar; French bistro La Fourchette; and Cupcake, a bakery specializing in fresh-baked cupcakes. Others have cropped up on nearby side streets, including Italian restaurant Pane e Vino on Warren and African coffeehouse Kudu Coffee on Vanderhorst.

In the past six months the local restaurant community's interest in the area has intensified, said developer Chris Price, a principal with PrimeSouth Group of Charleston, which has offices on upper King and owns a number of properties in the design district. "The best restaurant operators in Charleston have all been poking their heads up here," he said.

A high-end regional or national restaurant is likely to move into the vacant Chase Furniture building at 414 King, according to its owner, Land South Asset Management. The real estate firm doesn't expect to announce the new tenant until after the street beautification project is done, said managing partner Wayne Nix.

Waves of change

Decades ago upper King was a bustling commercial area, full of moderately priced furniture stores, clothing shops and five-and-dimes. Many of these businesses were owned by Jewish immigrant families who let their patrons buy on credit. That was a new and welcome option for the area's main customers, African Americans with limited incomes.

Middle King was popular with shoppers too, but pricier.

"When I was a kid, man, you couldn't see the concrete on (upper) King Street," recalled the Rev. Alfred D. Heyward, a Johns Island native who founded the What Cha Like Gospel CDs & Tapes store on upper King in 1978.

He recently moved the shop to North Charleston.

Business along King slowed in the 1970s and 1980s as new shopping outlets popped up outside downtown and people moved to the suburbs. Many upper King shops closed.

While many merchants relish the district's renaissance, others have mixed feelings. Some fear the area's transformation, coupled with rising rents, will push out long-standing mom-and-pops that enhance the area's flavor.

Those are major concerns for Boomer's Books, downtown Charleston's only remaining used-book store.

"Progress is going to, perhaps, lead to our demise," said Jim Breeden, a former college professor who co-owns the shop at 420 King with his wife, Lee.

It's not that the couple regrets the area's improvements. When Boomer's opened 12 years ago, upper King was "a grim area" full of run-down, vacant buildings, Jim Breeden recalled. "This looked like Berlin after World War II."

Parking a problem

But as the revitalized area has gained popularity, rents have risen accordingly. The landlord is giving Boomer's a good deal, but the business likely can't swallow future increases, Breeden said. "There's just no room in the new economic picture for a cheap, funky bookstore."

The area's changing ambience already has prompted a number of stores to close or relocate, including What Cha Like.

Heyward said his business suffered as the area lost many long-standing businesses that catered mainly to the black community, his bread and butter. In the past, he said, "Most all of these shops had a black person up front," even if they weren't minority-owned.

The new businesses moving to upper King are geared more to younger shoppers or tourists, Heyward said. "College kids, they don't buy gospel music."

Parking also was a problem in the old location, he said.

The shop is now at 3910-B Rivers Ave. in the Duel Lane Plaza, near McMillan Avenue. Its product mix has been expanded to include a boutique section selling apparel.

Also set to move soon is the Bookstore Cafe at 412 King. After 16 years in business there, the popular breakfast and lunch spot will close next Sunday and move to Anna Knapp Plaza off U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant. The new restaurant, called Charleston's Bookstore Cafe, is expected to open in mid-May.

Owners Keith and Linda Clarke said the restaurant couldn't keep up with rising rents downtown, but the couple doesn't begrudge the area's success. "Progress is what got us to where we are," Keith Clarke said. "We appreciate the loyal following."

'Last of a breed'

Other long-standing businesses have found ways to survive, and even thrive, on upper King.

"You've got to be creative," said Dixie Furniture Co. owner Sammy Kirshtein, whose late father opened the business on upper King 60 years ago.

The company, which sells "popular-priced" home furnishings, also has locations in North Charleston and Walterboro.

For example, Dixie has started advertising more and reaching out to other markets, such as college students. The business also benefits from owning its building.

And amid a whirlwind of change, the company has learned to co-exist with the new, more upscale businesses. "They're completely different from our type of operation," Kirshtein said. "We're the last of a breed on King Street."

Indeed, a number of Dixie's competitors have closed in recent years, including such landmarks as Chase Furniture, Metropolitan Furniture Co. and Altman's Furniture Co. The owners of these businesses cited various reasons for the closings, including declining sales and a lack of successors to carry on the business.

Still surviving from the earlier era is Morris Sokol Furniture, which carries a higher-end product.

Design district boosters say they hope the area will continue to have a mix of older and newer shops, and will draw a range of customers. For instance, while stores such as Dixie will attract shoppers of modest means, Coastal Classics' target market is mature women with a household income of $100,000 or more.

Spencer, co-owner of Coastal Classics, said she's excited to be doing business in an area that's finding renewed prominence as a shopping destination.

"This was where it all started," she said. "I'm just proud to be the new kid on the block."

Want to go?

The Upper King Design District in downtown Charleston will host its spring design walk from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, rain or shine. Refreshments will be served.

The district, stretching from Calhoun Street to Spring Street, is known for its concentration of design-related companies, specializing in products and services such as home decor, lighting, clothing and accessories, and interior design. Merchants typically hold design walks twice a year, in the spring and fall. The following shops are participating:

--Abney & Co. (antiques)

--B'zar (clothing)

--Circa Lighting

--California Closets

--Dwelling (home furnishings)

--English Rose Antiques

--Farushga (shoes)

--Felice Designs (jewelry)

--Filigree (jewelry)

--Fine Rugs of Charleston

--Haute Design

--King Street Antique Mall

--Lulan (fabrics)

--M. Craig & Co. (furniture)

--Maine Cottage (furniture)

--Max Jerome (accessories)

--Magar Hatworks

--Mescons (flooring)

--Putumayo (clothing)

--Read Brothers (fabrics, electronics)

--Salon Solas

--Urban Lighting

Several design-oriented retailers recently opened on upper King, including Parlor, 476 1/2 King, a beauty salon and clothing boutique selling skirts made from vintage sheets, and Coastal Classics, 511 King, a home furnishings store specializing in coastal cottage-style furniture.

Slated to open in June is Lesesne, a high-end home accessories store at 539 King. Products will include pillows, throws, vases, hand-crafted wood furniture and stationery.
 

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TheCharlottean said:
I've always wanted to go to the Galleria. I knew that it had over 350 stores of a very upscale nature, but I didn't know even the magnitude of the individual stores was of world-calibur. Southpark has a Cole Haan, but I guess I didn't consider it luxury enough to warrant putting it in my post (Plus, the Southpark CH is a women-only store, an experiment CH is doing, which makes it completely unique but also not as diverse in merchandise lineup). I can't figure out why Southpark doesn't have a Saks or a Versace boutique yet, with all of the stores I mentioned to its credit. And I'm sure the Galleria has even more high-end choices in the surrounding district named for it.

I've never been to a Foley's, though, they don't have them in NC. What's it like, in store design and merchandise?
We have Highland Village, Centre on Post Oak, Uptown Park, Post Oak Pavillion, among more shopping centers but still The Galleria is the one with the most upscale shops.
I think every city that has a Gianni Versace is just lucky, Versace closed all its Versace Jeans Couture boutiques and its only Versus boutique wich was located here in The Galleria, back when it almost went broke.
Foley's isn't really upscale is more middle class. Every Foley's is turning into Macy's including the one in The Galleria, people down here are keeping they're fingers crossed for Bloomingdale's to take the Macy's spot, once it takes over the Foley's spot. If Bloomingdale's doesn't come to Houston I'm preatty sure the mall management will surprise us all with something a lot better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't imagine anything much better than Bloomie's (considering how exclusive and uncommon they are in most cities), except maybe a full-fledged Barney's New York. But seeing as how Houston's already getting a CO-OP, I don't see that happening in the near future, unless their customer base is more different than I imagine.
 

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TheCharlottean said:
I can't imagine anything much better than Bloomie's (considering how exclusive and uncommon they are in most cities), except maybe a full-fledged Barney's New York. But seeing as how Houston's already getting a CO-OP, I don't see that happening in the near future, unless their customer base is more different than I imagine.
Bloomingadale's will be great, if they don't open here, hopefully the mall can turn the Macy's into more stores and restaurants. There where rumors of Macy's was becoming a highrise apartment building but only time will tell us....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JJ18 said:
Bloomingadale's will be great, if they don't open here, hopefully the mall can turn the Macy's into more stores and restaurants. There where rumors of Macy's was becoming a highrise apartment building but only time will tell us....
Yes, in the last few years living near or at a mall has become somewhat more commonplace. Simon, the company that owns and operates both The Galleria and Southpark, is currently building a 6-story luxury apartment building next to Southpark that will have ground-level retail and apartment rates set at $2 a square foot per month. (Which equates to about $5,000 a month for a 2,600-sq.-ft. unit, the average size of the planned units :eek: )
I personally don't believe they will turn the old Galleria Macy's into more shops. The Galleria has established itself as luring only the most high-end retail names, and there are so many in the mall that they've pretty much cornered the market on every brand I can think of... Unless they start branching out to other income levels, which I personally don't think would be a good idea. (It somehow takes away from the prestige of a luxury mall to have Dior or Armani intermingling with Forever 21 or The Shoe Department).
 

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I don't know if this is the right question for this thread...but, I like Tommy Hilfiger. I have been a fan of his clothes for about ten years when I bought my first pair of 70.00 dollar TH jeans. My question is which of the department stores sell the TH Line cheaper? I am not a mall shopper, but one day I went to Triangle Towne Centre in Raleigh. I viewed the prices of various THjeans in Belks, Dillards and JC Pennys(?) I found that Belk sold their TH merchandise cheaper then the other department stores. With my middle class budget, I do not consider Belks to be a cheap department store. Which of the department stores do feel sells TH mechanidise for a moderate price?

My take on Department stores based on the malls in my area...I have never been to the others that were mentioned on this thread.

The Everyman Department store:
Sears

Midrange Department stores with Upscale tendencies
Belk, JC Pennies, Dillards

Upscale:
Hechts (Macy's)
Saks
Nordstroms
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would say that's a fairly good categorization, except I've never seen a JCPenny with an upscale anything, Belk varies alot depending on the city/town it's in, and Hecht's isn't really upscale either, though Macy's is, and I'm sure the rebranding will bring some very applaudable changes.

And Neiman's is even more upscale in most markets than Saks Fifth Avenue, IMO.

Tommy Hilfiger is a very interesting brand, since it was started by a boating New Englander but gained (and stil has) popularity with the African-American 18-25 group, a feat I would not have thought possible. I own a TH shirt, but I don't wear it much (Mine is decidedly underwhelming in design).
 

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TheCharlottean said:
Yes, in the last few years living near or at a mall has become somewhat more commonplace. Simon, the company that owns and operates both The Galleria and Southpark, is currently building a 6-story luxury apartment building next to Southpark that will have ground-level retail and apartment rates set at $2 a square foot per month. (Which equates to about $5,000 a month for a 2,600-sq.-ft. unit, the average size of the planned units :eek: )
I personally don't believe they will turn the old Galleria Macy's into more shops. The Galleria has established itself as luring only the most high-end retail names, and there are so many in the mall that they've pretty much cornered the market on every brand I can think of... Unless they start branching out to other income levels, which I personally don't think would be a good idea. (It somehow takes away from the prestige of a luxury mall to have Dior or Armani intermingling with Forever 21 or The Shoe Department).
Hopefully if they do decide to built an apt. building they put retail in the bottom too. But who knows when the 2003 expansion opened Simon said that it wasn't going to be the last expansion and Galleria V will open in the near future. Whatever Simon decides to do with that space I know I'll be great.
When is the expansion of Southpark going to open? And have any stores anouncced they're opening in Southpark?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The expansion is set to open September 15th of this year, and that includes opening of the Neiman Marcus, the opening of the 50K sq. ft. addition to Dillard's, the 4-6 new stores in the Neiman's wing (That WILL include Hermes, Polo Ralph Lauren and BCBG Max Azria, and MAY include Armani A/X, Cartier and/or any number of other possibilities), the new Crate & Barrel at the mall entrance (Which will be the first full-service Crate & Barrel in the Carolinas, since the one in Raleigh doesn't carry C&B furniture), and maybe some or all of the shops in the ground floor of the new luxury apartment building (Though the apartments themselves aren't scheduled to be ready for occupancy until sometime next year)

I wish our Neiman's was going to be larger, though. It's set to be the third-smallest in the chain at 80,000 square feet, just ahead of Austin's (also at 80,000), and Palm Beach's (at 57,000). I'm sure they'll make the best use of that space, though, as has the Nordstrom (Which has packed a large array of merchandise into their 140,000 sq. ft. Southpark store through good layout and lack of excessive backstock space, which also makes the store seem both larger and more intimate in design with the lack of alot of open space).
 

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My misstake earlier I stated Neiman Marcus San Fransisco was larger than Houston's turns out San Fransisco's is only 195,000 sq ft and ours is 224,000 sq ft the largest Neiman Marcus even larger than its Dallas Flagships.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That's weird, though, to have a store in another city that's bigger than the flagship store(s), and have that other city be close enough geographically AND in size to where you're basically building bigger and/or better in a competing metro. When I think of flagship, I think of the biggest and/or most high-end store of a chain (Like the Belk Southpark and, to a lesser extent, the Belk Crabtree). Dallas has at least six Neiman's, and I'm sure Houston has no more than two. I guess that's proof of how much influence the desirability of the Galleria can exert on any national chain.
 

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Company Information

Printer Friendly>>Store Locations



Neiman Marcus Stores
Locations Fiscal Year
Opened Gross Store
Square Feet
Dallas, Texas (Downtown) 1908 129,000
Dallas, Texas (NorthPark) 1965 218,000
Houston, Texas (Galleria) 1969 224,000
Bal Harbour, Florida 1971
97,000
Atlanta, Georgia 1973 154,000
St. Louis, Missouri 1975 145,000
Northbrook, Illinois 1976 144,000
Fort Worth, Texas 1977 119,000
Washington, D.C. 1978 130,000
Newport Beach, California 1978 154,000
Beverly Hills, California 1979 185,000
Westchester, New York 1981 138,000
Las Vegas, Nevada 1981 174,000
Oak Brook, Illinois 1982 119,000
San Diego, California 1982 106,000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 1983 94,000
San Francisco, California 1983 251,000
Chicago, Illinois (Michigan Avenue) 1984 188,000
Boston, Massachusetts 1984 111,000
Palo Alto, California 1986 120,000
McLean, Virginia 1990 130,000
Denver, Colorado 1991 90,000
Minneapolis, Minnesota 1992 119,000
Scottsdale, Arizona 1992 118,000
Troy, Michigan 1993 157,000
Short Hills, New Jersey 1996 138,000
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 1996 142,000
Paramus, New Jersey 1997 141,000
Honolulu, Hawaii 1999 181,000
Palm Beach, Florida 2001 53,000
Plano, Texas (Willow Bend) 2002 156,000
Tampa, Florida 2003 96,000
Coral Gables, Florida 2003 136,000
Orlando, Florida 2003 95,000
San Antonio, Texas 2006 120,000
Boca Raton, Florida 2006 136,000
 

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micropundit said:
Company Information

Printer Friendly>>Store Locations



Neiman Marcus Stores
Locations Fiscal Year
Opened Gross Store
Square Feet
Dallas, Texas (Downtown) 1908 129,000
Dallas, Texas (NorthPark) 1965 218,000
Houston, Texas (Galleria) 1969 224,000
Bal Harbour, Florida 1971
97,000
Atlanta, Georgia 1973 154,000
St. Louis, Missouri 1975 145,000
Northbrook, Illinois 1976 144,000
Fort Worth, Texas 1977 119,000
Washington, D.C. 1978 130,000
Newport Beach, California 1978 154,000
Beverly Hills, California 1979 185,000
Westchester, New York 1981 138,000
Las Vegas, Nevada 1981 174,000
Oak Brook, Illinois 1982 119,000
San Diego, California 1982 106,000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 1983 94,000
San Francisco, California 1983 251,000
Chicago, Illinois (Michigan Avenue) 1984 188,000
Boston, Massachusetts 1984 111,000
Palo Alto, California 1986 120,000
McLean, Virginia 1990 130,000
Denver, Colorado 1991 90,000
Minneapolis, Minnesota 1992 119,000
Scottsdale, Arizona 1992 118,000
Troy, Michigan 1993 157,000
Short Hills, New Jersey 1996 138,000
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 1996 142,000
Paramus, New Jersey 1997 141,000
Honolulu, Hawaii 1999 181,000
Palm Beach, Florida 2001 53,000
Plano, Texas (Willow Bend) 2002 156,000
Tampa, Florida 2003 96,000
Coral Gables, Florida 2003 136,000
Orlando, Florida 2003 95,000
San Antonio, Texas 2006 120,000
Boca Raton, Florida 2006 136,000
My source told me that San Fransisco's was 195,000 sq ft, since I live in Houston I am able however to say that Houston is one of the biggest in the country and should be even more exclusive and upscale, because of the Town & Country Houston store that closed last year. Neiman Marcus loves Texas there's only two in Dallas, one in Plano, one in San Antonio, one here in Houston, and a soon to open in Austin. The Houston store just complited a multimillion dollar renovation, its simply a beautifull store, and should be the highest profitable store.
Neiman Marcus in Southpark is only going to be 80,000 sq ft, do you know if its going to include a restaurant or a cafe?
 

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NM Atlanta has started construction on the 53,000 sq ft expansion which will add a second floor to the NM wing and 35,000 sq ft of new retail.
 
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