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While most suburbs by definition export people to jobs in the urban core, some are doing well at generating employment opportunities. Corporations and governments have generated jobs in the suburbs, and not just back office, service industry positions (although these have been common).

Assuming fuel prices remain high, and individuals continue to value time more than in the past, then some suburbs whether close to urban cores or more distant may evolve into self-contained satellite cities with weaker links to the region’s major metro area.

Some who currently commute will find a similar job closer to home. Others will move to the evolving satellite city to be closer to their work. And some will keep their urban core jobs, but be able to tele-commute one or two days per week, or perhaps work in a local branch office occasionally. All of this will contribute to creating a more self-contained place — not just a space in which to live — where people will be able to reach jobs, schools and amenities on food, bicycle, bus or in less than a 10 minute drive. This will keep them supporting local businesses as well interacting more in their community, building social cohesion, which many suburban spaces lack.

In Canada, besides the Guelph-Cambridge-Kitchener — Waterloo satellite, there are others to watch. Hamilton Ontario; the townships southeast of Montreal; Red Deer and Lethbridge Alberta; and perhaps Squamish BC although the latter’s employment base is not keeping pace with residents who frequently commute to Vancouver or Whistler to work.

For the US, Everett might have been a satellite of Seattle, but the bigger city seems to have caught it and there is no break. At one time Ft. Worth offered a nice satellite to Dallas, but again infill development has largely merged the two together. A similar situation seems to exist for Phoenix or Los Angeles — at one time there were nice satellite cities, but they've become suburbs. On the other hand, places like White Planes, NY and Hopkins, MN were more successful at keeping their historical centers strong, while growing self-contained economies.



-- Older satellite cities that have their own downtown areas will never become true suburbs. Satellite cities have that historic soul, independent of the larger centre. White Plains, NY may be only 35 railways minutes from Manhattan, but it boasts an impressive downtown community on its own complete with rich employment opportunities and shopping galore.



Post your suggestions of great US satellite cities to watch for as the new sites of subtle, “under the radar” economic development.
 

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Cory
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I would toss Carmel, Indiana into this mix:




[edit] Industry
Several large companies reside in Carmel such as the National Headquarters for Conseco, Midwest ISO, and Pearson Education (formerly MacMillan Publishing), as well as the headquarters of ITT Technical Institute.[1] It is also home to many mid-sized and smaller companies.


[edit] Current Issues

[edit] Annexation
The City of Carmel has annexed large portions of Clay Township in the past and is pressing forward to annex more in the south-west area. In 2004, Carmel City Council first tried to annex an 8.3 square miles (21.5 km2) area that included more than 3,400 properties. Shortly after that initiative, an organization called No Ordinance for Annexation, or NOAX, worked to challenge the annexation in court. NOAX collected 70% of the homeowners' signatures in a petition allowing for a challenge in court. NOAX and Mayor James Brainard were able to negotiate a deal to delay annexation for three years and provide the maximum tax abatements allowed under Indiana law and road and infrastructure improvements. A second group, Holton's Southwest Clay Community Association, asserted that Carmel shouldn't annex south-west Clay Township. Holton's Southwest Clay Community Association argued that NOAX didn't have authority to strike a deal on behalf of all Clay township homeowners and took the City of Carmel to Court. Due to the ramifications of the decision for other Indiana communities, the case skipped the Indiana Appeals Court and went straight to the Indiana Supreme Court. The Indiana Supreme Court delivered a unanimous 5-0 decision ruling that Carmel can continue with its annexation. Holton's Southwest Clay Community Association recently reported that an appeal is "possible, but not probable."[7]


[edit] Keystone Avenue Project
The Keystone Avenue Project is a formidable road construction plan by the city of Carmel to make Keystone Avenue a signal-free road, utilizing underpasses and roundabout exchanges. This development has been underway since 2008 and is scheduled to be completed in 2010.


[edit] Background
The City of Carmel assumed ownership of a stretch of Keystone Avenue within Hamilton County and is currently rebuilding the road with roundabout exchanges onto major arteries. On September 6, 2007, the State of Indiana and the Indiana Department of Transportation came to an agreement to give Carmel control of State Road 431, known as Keystone Avenue, and $90 million to reconstruct the intersections of 96th Street to U.S. 31.[8]


[edit] Impact
Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard’s plan for Keystone Avenue is threefold; 1) aimed at making traffic flow more smoothly down the road, 2) make cross streets move more efficiently and 3) designed to make Carmel safer and more walkable. As the construction continues into 2010, Keystone will have above-ground roundabout exchanges at 106th, 116th, 126th, 131st and 136th Streets, as well as Carmel Drive, located between 116th and 126th.[9] Compared to the Indiana Department of Transportation’s (INDOT) plan which called for removing 13 structures, including homes and churches, Brainard’s and Carmel’s plan will affect only one business building. INDOT’s plan utilized circular roundabouts, while the city’s plan makes use of a dumbbell shape, which will use less space.[10] The project makes Keystone Avenue a free flowing, signal-free road from 96th Street to U.S. 31.


[edit] Progress
Construction at the 106th and 126th exchanges began in the spring of 2008. The 106th street and 126th street overpasses were opened to traffic on April 18, 2009, and are nearing completion. Construction for the 136th street exchange began in early 2009. The 116th Street and the Carmel Drive intersections will be under construction in mid 2009 followed by 131st in mid 2010.[11]


[edit] Carmel City Center
The Carmel City Center is a $300 million dollar complex being built in downtown Carmel. The City Center will play host to residences, shops and dining, office space and recreational use. Started in 2007, the project will be completed in 2010, opening the doors to everything this building has to offer.


[edit] Background
Currently under construction is the Carmel City Center, a multipurpose building project in downtown Carmel. The project is costing $300 million dollars, and developing more than 2,300,000 square feet (214,000 m2) of space to use for residences, retail shops and dining, office space, an amphitheater and an outdoor performance arts theater. [12] The City Center project is led by the City of Carmel in affiliation with the Pedcor Company, based in Carmel, IN. The project began construction in 2007 and is slated to finish in early 2010, with a grand opening in mid to late 2010. Businesses and shops will be able to open in the building soon after finishing and residence with leases will be able to move in after the grand opening. [13]



Population in July 2007: 53,282.

Males: 25,872 (48.6%)
Females: 27,410 (51.4%)



Median resident age: 37.2 years
Indiana median age: 35.2 years

Zip codes: 46032, 46033, 46082.

Carmel Zip Code Map

Estimated median household income in 2007: $94,092 (it was $81,583 in 2000)

Carmel: $94,092
Indiana: $47,448


Estimated median house or condo value in 2007: $254,458 (it was $201,400 in 2000)
Carmel: $254,458
Indiana: $122,900


Mean prices in 2007: All housing units: $307,541; Detached houses: $317,406; Townhouses or other attached units: $146,970; In 3-to-4-unit structures: $119,215; In 5-or-more-unit structures: $85,921; Mobile homes: $5,000
 

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D.C.
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On Washington's Maryland side Bethesda, Silver Spring, Hyattsville and College Park are the most important ring cities (in that order). All 4 have heavy rail metro access but a new light rail ring line connecting those 4 satellite cities will be completed around 2015 for faster travel between Washington's major ring cities.

On the Viriginia side, Tyson's corner has 35 million square ft of office space in its CBD, about the same amount as DT Minneapolis. Tyson's Corner is rapidly urbanizing in anticipation of getting a new heavy rail line connecting Dulles Airport to DT DC and the rest of the Metro. They're opening 4 Metro stations in Tysons Corner so that nearly the entire city will be within a half mile walk of a mass transit station. Infill urbanization and intensifying the street grid are the major goals for the area over the next 15 years, with great progress made already.
 

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Journeyman
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I'd never call Everett, WA, a suburb of Seattle. It's similar to Tacoma in that regard, though smaller.

Everett has a Navy base (the largest of the new "Home Port" bases in the 80s), the largest building in the world by volume (100 acres x 100' Boeing plant), and a small downtown that includes a new county office building and jail complex, a new 8,000(?)-seat arena and events center, and enough walkability, mixture of use, and retail to consider itself a satellite city. It almost even has a skyline.
 

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The major satellites around Detroit are Port Huron, Flint, Ann Arbor, and to a lesser extent Toledo, OH and Lansing. Some of the older satellites that have since become "suburbs" are Pontiac, Mt. Clemens, and Wyandotte. Some of the newer suburbs/satellites/job centers are Southfield, Troy, and Dearborn.
 

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Fort Worth is no suburb of Dallas. It is a city of 700,000 that is 30 miles west of Dallas. Fort Worth has "historic soul, independent of the larger centre".

Panorama of Ft. Worth from 1920


And some shots from the present










 

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Fairfax County in Virginia may soon qualify as a satellite town.
 

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In Canada, besides the Guelph-Cambridge-Kitchener — Waterloo satellite, there are others to watch. Hamilton Ontario; the townships southeast of Montreal; Red Deer and Lethbridge Alberta; and perhaps Squamish BC although the latter’s employment base is not keeping pace with residents who frequently commute to Vancouver or Whistler to work.
I don't at all understand your post. First of all, I'm from the South-Central US and I can tell you that Fort Worth is not a "satellite suburb" or an "alternative" to Dallas. It's the "Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex." Fort Worth was NEVER a suburb of Dallas, and in fact, is almost the size of Dallas. (Ft Worth, 700,000+ people, Dallas, 1,000,000+ people). Secondly, I go to school in Calgary and the quote above is confusing. Alberta is a beautiful Province with two great cities, Calgary and Edmonton, and beautiful parks and great small towns. BUT Lethbridge is an hour and a half south of Calgary..Red Deer is an hour and a half north of Calgary (half-way to Edmonton). How on Earth are Red Deer and Lethbridge combining as a metro? That through me for quite a loop..lol
 

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Yeah. Arlington, Alexandria, Falls Church, and Fairfax (city) are all nice urban nodes, but much of Fairfax County is just typical suburban sprawl you'll find outside many cities.
 

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D.C.
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Yeah. Arlington, Alexandria, Falls Church, and Fairfax (city) are all nice urban nodes, but much of Fairfax County is just typical suburban sprawl you'll find outside many cities.
Except for the fact that no other city but New York has a county as rich as Fairfax. Only DC has a county like Fairfax.

Also, Mount Vernon, George Washington's home is in Fairfax County. Tyson's Corner in Fairfax has as much office space as DT Minneapolis and there are 2 heavy rail metro lines completed and one under construction in Fairfax. Clearly, Fairfax county is not something you'll find outside of just any city.
 

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Yeah. Arlington, Alexandria, Falls Church, and Fairfax (city) are all nice urban nodes, but much of Fairfax County is just typical suburban sprawl you'll find outside many cities.
There are voices within the Fairfax County gov't who want the city to become an incorporated city so there's more control over taxes and infrastructure planning.
 
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