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what will be the future of the boswash megalopolis??

my prognosis there will be 65 million inhabitans around 2045 ,and the corridor between wash balt and boston will all build up..

there will be a high speed train system between all cities ..

nyc will catch the 30 millon line by 2050

what are your statements ..
 

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Do you mean NYC metropolitan will be at 30 million residents by 2050? I sure hope you mean that because there is not possible way that NYC will go up to 30 million residents, unless every borough becomes a Manhattan, or something!

The Corridor between Baltimore and D.C. will probably be fully built out by 2025, due to the BRAC or whatever it's called! Baltimore and D.C. are already becoming one metropolitan (they should have already been one because of how close they are to each other in my opinion)!

I can see mass-transit going through all the cities of the BosWash corridor, considering there is already the "Acela Express"!


I can see a new "city" coming between Baltimore and Philadelphia with a population of over 100,000!

New Jersey's population will continue to rise to the point that it's even more built out than it currently is!

Maryland will be the nations 3rd Gambling Center (Behind Las Vegas, and Atlantic City), causing it to become a major state!

New York State will grow but slower!

Connecticut has potential to become a major player in the BosWash corridor if it plays it's cards right, it can become a major connection point between Boston and New York City!

Boston needs to find a plan to get people driving up to it a little more! Because currently most of the I-95 traffic stops at NYC, if you know what I'm saying! Traffic goes through D.C., Baltimore, Philly, NYC, and NYC is the final point of where people like to travel to! Somebody understands what I'm saying! :lol:

Philadelphia Metro will most likely grow to a max of 7,000,000 to 8,000,000 and that is because of the Maryland area population boom! (For those who don't know parts of MD are considered to be in the Philly area)

That's all I have to say, I guess!
 

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^^^Just being a prude, but Wilmington, DE is the existing city over a 100,000 people between Philadelphia and Baltimore.

I don't think Maryland possibly becoming a big gambling state is gong to make it a major state...it already is rather major. Born and raised in N.C. btw.
 

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Eventually it will stretch down to Richmond. Possibly Norfolk, but im not sure. Thats going to take a while.
 

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I don't think it'll ever expand to Richmond. I think high speed rail to Hampton Roads is definitely possible so economically there will be more of a connection, but I don't think the stretches will be fully developed in the way we talk about. I don't think the sprawl will continue at the pace that it has. I already consider DC and B'more merged economically and from the development standpoint. Areas like Ft. Meade and Laurel will grow more as will some areas north of Baltimore. I don't see a big city between B'more and Wilmington. Maybe some scattered sprawl and some growing of the other cities on that stretch like Elkton and Havre de Grace.

I think places will continue to grow population wise, but I don't envision as much sprawl. I really hope the infrastructure improves on the corridor though.
 

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I can see a new "city" coming between Baltimore and Philadelphia with a population of over 100,000!

Maryland will be the nations 3rd Gambling Center (Behind Las Vegas, and Atlantic City), causing it to become a major state!

Philadelphia Metro will most likely grow to a max of 7,000,000 to 8,000,000 and that is because of the Maryland area population boom! (For those who don't know parts of MD are considered to be in the Philly area)
I do see the Aberdeen-Harve de Grace-Perryville area having sizeable growth in the future, but never to become a “new” city. That vicinity will become a better-developed link between the White Marsh-Edgewood-Bel Air area (northeast of Baltimore) and the Newark-Bear-Elkton area (southwest of Wilmington). I guess that means Charlestown and North East will see growth too. The “new” city between Baltimore and Philadelphia will rather be a “comeback” city in Wilmington. I’ve heard of an idea to connect MARC out of Baltimore with SEPTA in Philadelphia. The Wilmington-Newark area will serve as the joining link, which should make it a more centralized location.

I see Delaware becoming the 3rd gambling center in the nation before Maryland. Slot parlors have been active in Delaware for the past 15 years. Sports betting will become legal later this summer and into fall. Delaware is the only state east of the Mississippi River with the reserved right to legalize sports betting. On top of that, there has been talk of bringing live table games to the state within the next couple of years. Maybe Maryland will become a big gambling state as well, and along with Delaware and New Jersey a gambling megalopolis will take shape. In that case, Route 40 from Baltimore to Atlantic City will see much more traffic. I have a feeling that Pennsylvania will have something to say about all that.

Many people seem to overlook the ever strong and still growing “satellite” city of Wilmington. I can’t believe I just used the “S” word. The Wilmington MSA has historically included New Castle Co. DE and Salem Co. NJ. Now called the Wilmington-Newark MSA, it can be argued that the area includes Cecil Co. MD, eastern Kent Co. MD, southwestern Chester Co. PA, and southwestern Delaware Co. PA. Most people classify the Wilmo-Newark MSA as the southern portion of the Philly MSA.
 

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I don't think people outside of the mid-atlantic and northeast ever even think about Wilmington which is a shame. I think the city just needs to find another big/hot industry to fuel future growth. If not, than just be a business-friendly city that's well-rounded and have some modest growth.
 

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I can see a new "city" coming between Baltimore and Philadelphia with a population of over 100,000!
You mean Wilmington?
(City population ~72,000, county population ~530,000, "metro area" population ~625,000)

Maryland will be the nations 3rd Gambling Center (Behind Las Vegas, and Atlantic City), causing it to become a major state!!
Actually, Delaware has already taken the steps to become the third gambling spot in the United States. Sports betting is being brought back, which not even Atlantic City can do like Delaware is now able to do. I believe that table games were also legalized.

Connecticut has potential to become a major player in the BosWash corridor if it plays it's cards right, it can become a major connection point between Boston and New York City!
Hartford would be a great connector for Boston and New York City, but its problem is that it is not on I-95. Even if it's a little out of the way, it is out of the way enough to make it inconvenient to drive there. If it were farther south, or I-95 were built through the "waist" of Connecticut, then there would be a direct route from New York to Boston that would benefit Hartford. As it is, the detour to get there is enough for most business to just keep driving by.

Philadelphia Metro will most likely grow to a max of 7,000,000 to 8,000,000 and that is because of the Maryland area population boom! (For those who don't know parts of MD are considered to be in the Philly area)
The Maryland part of the Philadelphia metro is part of the metro because Elkton MD is considered to be a "suburb" of Newark DE, which is considered to be a "suburb" of Wilmington, which is considered to be a "suburb" of Philadelphia. The link between Elkton and all of Cecil County and Philadelphia is pretty weak, in reality. Actually, I think that Cecil County will eventually become part of the greater Baltimore metro in time.

As far as growing goes, The consolidation of jobs at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds won't benefit the Philadelphia metro that much. Obviously, it will benefit Aberndeen, Bel Air, and Havre de Grace. Most economists and planners around here expect the benefits of the relocated jobs to spread from as far south as Baltimore to as far north as Elkton and Newark. Newark seems to be on the outer fringe of any benefit, and that's only provided that the industries in the area (pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, etc) play an important role for the Proving Grounds and servicing industries.
 

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I don't see how it will expand to Richmond. There would need to be substantial growth of a city below Stafford for that to happen. Fredericksburg is the only possibility at this point, but I don't see that happening. Places like Fredericksburg are going to be suffering for a while unless some jobs go there b/c of the housing/retail bust. With high speed rail to Richmond and Norfolk, the connectivity would be a lot better, but I don't see it being a real part of the megalopolis, the distances would still be too large. Maybe in a 50-100 years more cities will span the corridor.
 

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Hartford would be a great connector for Boston and New York City, but its problem is that it is not on I-95. Even if it's a little out of the way, it is out of the way enough to make it inconvenient to drive there. If it were farther south, or I-95 were built through the "waist" of Connecticut, then there would be a direct route from New York to Boston that would benefit Hartford. As it is, the detour to get there is enough for most business to just keep driving by.
I don't think the fact that Hartford isn't on I-95 is a problem. The vast majority of traffic NYC-BOS uses I-684+I-84 or I-95+I-91+I-84 to reach the Mass Turnpike (I-90), both of which pass through Hartford. Only businesses from Rhode Island and Southern Mass use the I-95 route between Providence and New Haven. I-95 is actually a somewhat longer route and has lower speed limits.

Hartford's best shot to grow is to use its clout as an insurance hub and its relationship with Springfield, MA to develop an urban corridor north to Springfield.
 

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I haven't been in New England in a long time so I guess that I will have to take your word. Still with I-95 being "America's Main Street", Hartford is like a store located on a side street from a main street. Anyone not familiar with New England is not going to realize that Hartford is on a shorter route. Plus, with Providence in between Boston and New York (on I-95 or otherwise), if you start to connect Boston and New York via both Providence and Hartford, you start to zig-zag a little. It seems that one is going to win out more than the other.

Hartford does have the big advantage of being the insurance capital of the country (and of the world?). I think Hartford is kind of in the same boat as Wilmington: a mid-sized city that is the center of an entire industry (credit cards and pharmaceuticals, in Wilmington's case), and is sandwiched by bigger and more important cities. Both cities should probably stick to their guns and hopefully it keeps them relevant and maybe helps them gain stature in the future.
 

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Beer is a Tasty Treat
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I haven't been in New England in a long time so I guess that I will have to take your word. Still with I-95 being "America's Main Street", Hartford is like a store located on a side street from a main street. Anyone not familiar with New England is not going to realize that Hartford is on a shorter route. .
I'm sure there are people who just assume that 95 is the way to go and, therefore, do so. (Perhaps it's the same people heading to NYC who stay on 95 through Philadelphia as opposed to getting on the NJ Tpk from Delaware) But 95 east of New Haven is much less travelled than the 91 to 84 to 90 route- in fact, 95 drops to two lanes each way past New Haven where it's at least three lanes each way on 91 to 84 to 90 north of New Haven. I would imagine with the growth of satnav that more people than ever before will be directed through Hartford on their way to Boston from the southwest.
 

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I'm sure there are people who just assume that 95 is the way to go and, therefore, do so. (Perhaps it's the same people heading to NYC who stay on 95 through Philadelphia as opposed to getting on the NJ Tpk from Delaware) But 95 east of New Haven is much less travelled than the 91 to 84 to 90 route- in fact, 95 drops to two lanes each way past New Haven where it's at least three lanes each way on 91 to 84 to 90 north of New Haven. I would imagine with the growth of satnav that more people than ever before will be directed through Hartford on their way to Boston from the southwest.
Been there, nearly did that on the I-95/NJT thing through Philly. Good thing the jam had reached all the way to the split by the time I got there.

I was also thinking about the # of lanes argument, but it's difficult to make that work due to the prevalence of commuter traffic. Still, the only continuous route of 6+ lane road (slight gap at Hartford connector) is I-95+I-91+I-84.
 

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I don't think the fact that Hartford isn't on I-95 is a problem. The vast majority of traffic NYC-BOS uses I-684+I-84 or I-95+I-91+I-84 to reach the Mass Turnpike (I-90), both of which pass through Hartford. Only businesses from Rhode Island and Southern Mass use the I-95 route between Providence and New Haven. I-95 is actually a somewhat longer route and has lower speed limits.

Hartford's best shot to grow is to use its clout as an insurance hub and its relationship with Springfield, MA to develop an urban corridor north to Springfield.
So how exactly does Hartford "use it's clout" to develop an "urban corridor" up to Springfield?
 

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Uh, hm, Dank City, how does any city grow? It uses its natural advantages, preexisting industries, and potential relationships with other cities to attract jobs, which ultimately drive development. The southern corridor is already significantly developed. Hartford has, and knows it has, an opportunity in its relationship with the Pioneer Valley.
 
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