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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you think will happen with the HSR and what would you like to happen? (Prolly two Seperate Things).

I'll post mine later when I have time to check some of the names of the streets (I know where the buses go but not the names of the streets lol) but I figured I start the conversation off now by saying 10 Beeline should become an LRT.
 

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They need better service on the 43 stonchurch as well and a Rymal Rd Route.

I have also thought that a cool shopping center shuttle during christmas rish to run in a loop from Eastgate up Centenial pkwy down mud st to the linc to Limeridge then to the Meadowlands then to Jackson to Center Mall then back to Eastgate.
 

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hamer town said:
They need better service on the 43 stonchurch as well and a Rymal Rd Route.

I have also thought that a cool shopping center shuttle during christmas rish to run in a loop from Eastgate up Centenial pkwy down mud st to the linc to Limeridge then to the Meadowlands then to Jackson to Center Mall then back to Eastgate.

That's an Awesome idea! But I say keep it all year round. There are people in the east end / Stoney Creek who would like to go to the Meadowlands (since there are no theaters anywhere around anymore) but don't want to spend 1.5-2 hrs on busses trying to get there!!
 

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I have a copy of the Transportation Master Plan - Phase 2 which goes on supporting rapid transit. The Master Plan made it so that city council has to pick either Bus Rapid Transit or Light Rail Transit.

Here's a quote out of the Transportation Master Plan

The exact alignment and characteristics of the transit corridors will be established in the next phase of the Transportation Master Plan. In general, there would be two corridors:

· An east-west corridor extending from McMaster University to Eastgate Square
· A north-south corridor extending from the Downtown Core to Limeridge Mall and potentially from downtown (or a southerly location) to Meadowlands

It is proposed that the development of transit corridors occur in a phased approach starting with the enhancement of the existing Beeline (express service). A possible strategy for introducing higherorder transit would be as follows:
In the short term, establish a priority transit system by:
· Increasing service levels on existing lines within the designated corridors;
· Introducing transit priority measures including signal modifications and queue jump lanes in congestion areas;
· Developing enhanced transit stop facilities and terminal facilities;

In the longer term, establish a Bus Rapid Transit System by:
· Dedicating lanes for buses;
· Potentially utilizing advanced special-purpose buses;
· Enhancing station facilities at key locations, with the goal of integrating stations with existing or new developments;
· Implementing passenger information systems along the routes, including real-time bus information at key transit stops.

While the preliminary expectation is that the rapid transit system would rely on bus technology, it is premature to finalize this recommendation until detailed alignments and ridership forecasts are established. However, some of the considerations and characteristics of each technology are provided in Exhibit 6.3 below.

A Bus Rapid Transit system would be similar to systems being implemented in York Region and proposed for Brampton, Durham and many other Canadian Cities. The key advantage of a Bus Rapid Transit system is that it is cost-effective, can be developed incrementally, and provides very competitive travel times for transit. This type of system allows the City to introduce more transitfriendly development, which will ultimately provide the basis for moving to higher forms of rapid transit in the future, including Light Rail Transit or Subway Transit, if supported by sufficient land use densities.

Here's a screenshot of the Master Plan


Now that the City has approved a Nodes and Corridor GRID plan the Transportation Master Plan finally gets to get finalized. I dunno when that should be completed.

If you want a copy of Phase 2 - Transportation Master Plan PM me and I'll email it to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just looked at the transportation downtown plan and it was pretty good. However To make room for RT a few things need to change.

1) James and John sts. South maintain John north and James south routing with Opposite direction limited to an access lane and a parking lane where needed. A Bus Lane/Bike Lane/Right Turn lane added to the Right

S=South N=North P=Parking BBRT=Bus Bike Right Turn

so Five Lanes on John Set up like this:

SP/S/N/N/NBBRT

And on James

SBBRT/S/S/N/NP

South of charlton one way and St.Joe's Drive One Way

Keeps the advantage of 2 way but allows people to actually get downtown rather than sitting there watching empty lanes for southbound traffic

Main and King Through Downtown would have the same set up with Gore Park pedestrianised and a new Transit Terminal behind the big tower connecting with Mc Nab Street.

Signs would encourage Through Traffic to use the usual one way arrangements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As far as actually transit is concerned other than the mentioned Bus Lanes on James and John. And on Main and King.

There would be BRT service On 10 Beeline (with a loop up to the Go Centre)and a new 20 A-line to Limeridge Mall that uses the 25 routing.

BRt would have Bus Bike Right Turn lanes, Signal Priority, and limited (eventually pre-paid) Stops.

Deicated Centre ROW to BRT standards (except it would be in the middle of the streets and have regular stop spacing like spadina in toronto) on Concession Street From Wellington to Sherman. The rest would be closed on Saturdays to make a street shopping atmosphere (much like High Street in Walthamstow if you've ever been.)

signal Pre-emption would be installed on every Street with Two or more routes.

That would be Phase 1

Phase two would be an LRT on the 10 route with an extension through Mac (with stations at The Middle and West of campus) down Cootes into Dundas Left down Main (well Dundas main that is) To the intersection of Osler and Hamilton Main. The down Main/Wilson to Golf Links and Wilson in Ancaster then down Golf Links to the medowlands.

20 service would become LRT and a 20A route along Concession to Sherman be built for peak shopping times during the week and all day saturday.

30 Cline BRT to The airport along Upper James route.

40 Dline BRT along current 41 Mohawk route on the moutain and Straight to the Centre Mall down the mountain.

50 Eline BRT to Waterdown Via Aldershot Go.

Service Cuts to meat these routes would be 1A (Thats King West of Downtown), 5C's alternate routing to Ancaster, and The 41A would continue the same routing but as the new 41 Mohawk as the old 41 would be cut.

All routes would have pre-emptive traffic signals.

Phase 3 an extension of the LRT to the Airport through a Subway

all streets with 3 or more routes or two if congestion is hurting bus times would get buslanes.

LRT extentsion to Stoney Creek

and a 60 Fline Between Medownlands and Eastgate following the following route.

Eastgate up centenial to Mud, Down Mud to Valley Park, From Valley Park back to Mud and Along the Link, Then through a short subway to meet the LRT at the Medowlands underground next to the Bus Stops that are there now. Along the Link the Centre Lanes would be HOV and in the medians next to streets with exits there would be Subway like stations(cept smaller) Access would just be to the Streets except at Garth (where it would also connect with the pedestrian bridge (allowing good access to Westmount where tonnes of students would use the line) and at Wentworth where a pedestrian subway would connect it with the Transit Centre and the Transit sentre with the mall.

I know its all just a pipe dream based on peoples attitudes but if we lobbied for funding agressively (and got it like toronto does) and did NOT extend the Urban Boundries (they only rejected this because developers contribute big bucks to their campaigns).
 

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hamiltonguyo said:
As far as actually transit is concerned other than the mentioned Bus Lanes on James and John. And on Main and King.

There would be BRT service On 10 Beeline (with a loop up to the Go Centre)and a new 20 A-line to Limeridge Mall that uses the 25 routing.

. . .

That would be Phase 1

Phase two would be an LRT on the 10 route with an extension through Mac (with stations at The Middle and West of campus) down Cootes into Dundas Left down Main (well Dundas main that is) To the intersection of Osler and Hamilton Main. The down Main/Wilson to Golf Links and Wilson in Ancaster then down Golf Links to the medowlands.

20 service would become LRT and a 20A route along Concession to Sherman be built for peak shopping times during the week and all day saturday.

30 Cline BRT to The airport along Upper James route.

40 Dline BRT along current 41 Mohawk route on the moutain and Straight to the Centre Mall down the mountain.

50 Eline BRT to Waterdown Via Aldershot Go.
I completely support your ideas, but I just have to nitpick your names. Hamilton's express service is called Beeline (as in a beeline to the honey, or in other words the fastest and most direct route to a particular target or destination) similar to Vancouver where it was called B-Line and the name and number changed (99 B-Line: UBC-Burnaby, 98 B-Line: Vancouver-Richmond) These B-Lines are precursors to Skytrain/subway expansion. Similar to Toronto's Rocket routes (191 Hwy. 27 Rocket, 192 Airport Rocket, 196 York University Rocket). Therefore subsequent routes would not go down the alphabet, but would retain the "Beeline" name. Otherwise it'd be easier to simply give the express routes letters rather than numbers to differentiate them from the regular bus routes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was using the names to avoid naming them but since you suggested my suggested name for these transit lines which wouldn't be built even if we had the money cause it would all be spend on a new expressway:

10-Beeline King Later 10-Beeline LRT

20-Beeline Limeridge Mall

30-Beeline Airport

40-Beeline Crossmountain

50-Beeline Waterdown

60 Beeline Parkway (yes except for mud st it is all on "parkways"

Edit: An alternative name would be Rapid(pronounced the french way) which would replace the Beeline name.
 

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I think Hamilton needs to elect a new mayor. The current mayor obviously doesn't give a shit about transit. There are major transit projects all over the extended GTA but nothing in Hamilton. And also the city is using its gas tax money on roads and bridges instead of transit.
 

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Guess what? Starting 2007 Hamilton is going start purchasing Bus Trapid Transit systems! The Gas Tax Steering Committee wants their final report approved today and it deals with BRT.

I'll add more information about this here in a bit.
 

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3.3.2 STRATEGY C.2 – DEVELOP BUS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM

The long-term goal for Hamilton is to develop full bus rapid transit in an east-west corridor and a north-south corridor utilizing a combination dedicated transit lanes (where physically possible) and transit priority measures, in conjunction with high capacity, modern buses, advanced information systems and fare collection and enhanced transit stops/stations. The BRT network would be supported by land use policies that encourage more compact and mixed-use development around transit nodes and corridors.

Building on the concept of the existing Beeline, the BRT system would provide faster travel times between major origins and destinations allowing transit to compete with the private auto. Experience in other jurisdictions indicates that BRT can have a significant impact on attracting new transit riders. For example, a report for Transport Canada on the 98 B-Line Bus Rapid Transit System from Richmond to Vancouver found that 25% of current transit users changed their mode of travel to using the 98 B-Line service with 31% of the trips on the 98 BLine being new transit trips.

Short term (2006-2009)
* Finalize corridor selection (under TMP)
* Introduce articulated buses on Beeline
* Develop off-board payment systems
* Develop image and marketing program for BRT
* Establish staff responsibility for planning, design and implementation•
* Initiate Individual Environmental Assessment for E-W and N-S corridors

Medium Term (2010-2015)
* Construct BRT system components (physical improvements to accommodate dedicated transit lanes, station stops, terminals)
* Increase service levels in BRT corridors
* Initiate marketing and promotion
* Design and implement feeder services

Longer Term (2015-2031)
* Increase degree of segregation between cars and buses, while ensuring access for commercial vehicles and emergency vehicles.
* Continued increase in frequencies

3.3.3 STRATEGY C.3 – EXPAND ARTICULATED BUS FLEET

There are several routes that experience high load factors as they enter and exit the downtown core. These include the Beeline, King, Delaware and University routes. For example, in the morning peak period, the University route operates at 92% capacity as it passes Caroline Street. Similarly, the King route is at 97% capacity as it passes West Avenue in the PM peak hour. At McMaster University, load factors often exceed capacity during peak periods. If transit riders cannot get on a bus because it is full, or longer distance riders cannot get a seat, this is a disincentive to use public transit.

One way of addressing transit capacity shortfalls is to introduce articulated buses, which provide approximately 70% more capacity than a conventional 40 foot bus. Currently, HSR has three 60 foot articulated buses in its fleet that are used on the University Route, but these are approaching 25 years old. This strategy would involve eventually replacing all of the buses on the King (13 buses) and Beeline Express (12 buses) and the University routes (3 buses) with new articulated buses. A staging strategy would be to introduce articulated buses on the Beeline as part of the development of an expanded BRT network.

The benefits of articulated buses are that significant increases in system capacity can be achieved without increases in labour costs. Passenger satisfaction is enhanced due to reduced crowding. However, articulated buses should not be used to off-set necessary increases in service frequencies.

Short term (2006-2009)
* Replace 3 existing articulated buses with newer versions
* Purchase 12 new articulated buses for use on the Beeline Express service
* Look at ways to market articulated buses in conjunction with BRT, potentially with a unique look.

Medium Term (2010-2015)
* Expand articulated fleet as required based on load factors
* Expand garage capacity/equipment to accommodated articulated buses.

Longer Term (2015-2031)
* Evaluate system capacity requirements and assess feasibility for conversion to LRT in east-west corridor

Currently there's a study to determine the location and layout for a new downtown terminal. Construction of the new downtown terminal should happen in 2007 or 2008. Where you think the new downtown terminal should be located? I think those parking lots along King William and Hughson and John should be new downtown terminal. Looks like the BRT will be running in 2010 or 2011.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Steeltown said:
3.3.2 STRATEGY C.2 – DEVELOP BUS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM

The long-term goal for Hamilton is to develop full bus rapid transit in an east-west corridor and a north-south corridor utilizing a combination dedicated transit lanes (where physically possible) and transit priority measures, in conjunction with high capacity, modern buses, advanced information systems and fare collection and enhanced transit stops/stations. The BRT network would be supported by land use policies that encourage more compact and mixed-use development around transit nodes and corridors.

Building on the concept of the existing Beeline, the BRT system would provide faster travel times between major origins and destinations allowing transit to compete with the private auto. Experience in other jurisdictions indicates that BRT can have a significant impact on attracting new transit riders. For example, a report for Transport Canada on the 98 B-Line Bus Rapid Transit System from Richmond to Vancouver found that 25% of current transit users changed their mode of travel to using the 98 B-Line service with 31% of the trips on the 98 BLine being new transit trips.

Short term (2006-2009)
* Finalize corridor selection (under TMP)
* Introduce articulated buses on Beeline
* Develop off-board payment systems
* Develop image and marketing program for BRT
* Establish staff responsibility for planning, design and implementation•
* Initiate Individual Environmental Assessment for E-W and N-S corridors

Medium Term (2010-2015)
* Construct BRT system components (physical improvements to accommodate dedicated transit lanes, station stops, terminals)
* Increase service levels in BRT corridors
* Initiate marketing and promotion
* Design and implement feeder services

Longer Term (2015-2031)
* Increase degree of segregation between cars and buses, while ensuring access for commercial vehicles and emergency vehicles.
* Continued increase in frequencies

3.3.3 STRATEGY C.3 – EXPAND ARTICULATED BUS FLEET

There are several routes that experience high load factors as they enter and exit the downtown core. These include the Beeline, King, Delaware and University routes. For example, in the morning peak period, the University route operates at 92% capacity as it passes Caroline Street. Similarly, the King route is at 97% capacity as it passes West Avenue in the PM peak hour. At McMaster University, load factors often exceed capacity during peak periods. If transit riders cannot get on a bus because it is full, or longer distance riders cannot get a seat, this is a disincentive to use public transit.

One way of addressing transit capacity shortfalls is to introduce articulated buses, which provide approximately 70% more capacity than a conventional 40 foot bus. Currently, HSR has three 60 foot articulated buses in its fleet that are used on the University Route, but these are approaching 25 years old. This strategy would involve eventually replacing all of the buses on the King (13 buses) and Beeline Express (12 buses) and the University routes (3 buses) with new articulated buses. A staging strategy would be to introduce articulated buses on the Beeline as part of the development of an expanded BRT network.

The benefits of articulated buses are that significant increases in system capacity can be achieved without increases in labour costs. Passenger satisfaction is enhanced due to reduced crowding. However, articulated buses should not be used to off-set necessary increases in service frequencies.

Short term (2006-2009)
* Replace 3 existing articulated buses with newer versions
* Purchase 12 new articulated buses for use on the Beeline Express service
* Look at ways to market articulated buses in conjunction with BRT, potentially with a unique look.

Medium Term (2010-2015)
* Expand articulated fleet as required based on load factors
* Expand garage capacity/equipment to accommodated articulated buses.

Longer Term (2015-2031)
* Evaluate system capacity requirements and assess feasibility for conversion to LRT in east-west corridor

Currently there's a study to determine the location and layout for a new downtown terminal. Construction of the new downtown terminal should happen in 2007 or 2008. Where you think the new downtown terminal should be located? I think those parking lots along King William and Hughson and John should be new downtown terminal. Looks like the BRT will be running in 2010 or 2011.

excellent. I think the terminal should be in between Gore Park and McNab street where there is an empty lot and a parking lot now. This would be the new King and James terminal where the BRT and mountain buses would stop (seeing as they want to pedestrianise the South Branch of King)
 

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Well guess what?! Hamilton is officially into the BRT business.

Hamilton is getting ready to approve on July 12:

* Purchase five replacement 40-foot Hybrid (Diesel/Electric) Conventional Transit Low Floor buses from the low bidder, New Flyer Industries, at an upset net unit cost of $553,285 and a total upset net cost to the City of $2,766,425.
* Purchase seven replacement 60-foot Articulated Hybrid (Diesel/Electric) Conventional Transit Low Floor buses from the low bidder, New Flyer Industries, at an upset net unit cost of $822,634 and a total upset net cost to the City of $5,758,438.
* Purchase five replacement 40-foot Diesel Conventional Transit Low Floor buses from the low bidder, New Flyer Industries, at an upset net unit cost of $385,840 and a total upset net cost to the City of $1,929,200.
* Expenditures in the amount of $10,454,063
* Undertake a Marketing initiative, at the direction of the Transit Master Plan Steering Committee to re-brand the current Beeline Express, Route #10 to BRT.

For 2007

* Purchase of seventeen replacement 40-foot Diesel Conventional Transit Low Floor buses from the low bidder, New Flyer Industries, at an upset net unit cost of $385,840 and a total upset net cost to the City of $6,559,280.
* Two 35-foot Trolley Replica buses, to replace 2 Conventional Transit buses, on the basis of a “sole-source” negotiation at an upset net unit cost of $550,000 and a total net cost to the City of $1,100,000.
* Draw $50,000 from the Provincial Gas Tax reserve for 2007 only to provide for the re-introduction of the Gore-to-Shore shuttle beginning in 2007. Expenditures in the amount of $7,659,280 be directed to the 2007

The Transit Master Plan Steering Committee strongly advocates for the purchase of Articulated buses for the BeeLine Express route to improve capacity and to introduce the concept of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) which is normally associated with Articulated buses.

You can read the whole report here: http://www.myhamilton.ca/NR/rdonlyres/1ADB15F3-0DC3-4083-B5FE-7D9489292E3A/0/Jul12PW06092.pdf

Awesome news to hear especically the Gore to Shore shuttle service with new trolleys look alike.
 

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The city is getting ready to purchase 7 of these for the BRT along the Beeline Express.





And two of these for the Gore to Shore Shuttle



 

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Hey Hamiltonguy you seem to know your transit so I gotta question with these Hybrid - Diesel/Electric buses do they need wires over top for the electric part of fuel?

Or they can just run on diesel and if the city ever wanted to change these buses to electric they can add wires? Or does these buses run on both diesel and electric there must install wires?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Steeltown said:
Hey Hamiltonguy you seem to know your transit so I gotta question with these Hybrid - Diesel/Electric buses do they need wires over top for the electric part of fuel?

Or they can just run on diesel and if the city ever wanted to change these buses to electric they can add wires? Or does these buses run on both diesel and electric there must install wires?
Hybrid buses are like hybrid cars. At least the ones i'm talking about.

I know there have been trolley buses that had diesel motors installed at one point in hamilton but they were not used for regular route travelling.

Boston however has them in regular service.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual-mode_bus these are called dual mode buses.
 

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Here's what the hybrid New Flyer buses looks like that the city is purchasing, 5 of them.



According to the report these buses will be like a pilot project. If the city likes them the City will order more of them in the 2008 budget.
 
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