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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a challenge for everyone! Let's design the city of the future, to be located in the Negev. This is just a theoretical city, and let's see where it goes after we design it. The city would be high tech, with advanced or experimental infrastructure and architecture and utopian urban planning. It would be Israel's answer to Dubai, with an emphasis on practical living, rather than megalithic buildings.

It would be a city of renewable energy, clean water, fresh air, automated electric transportation, futurist architecture, open spaces, wide variety of public recreation areas, etc. One idea I have is to make it the "City of Light" (Illuminopolis or the Hebrew equivalent). It's lights would be seen miles away, like the Emerald City from Wizard of Oz). Its buildings (all silky white in color) would spiral upwards, with the tallest buildings in the center and spiraling walkways in the sky connecting the buildings. Computer controlled dancing colored lights would illuminate the buildings and its surrounding environment at night. Colored LED lights and fiber optics on the walls and walkways would interact in accordance with motion sensors and music.

The city could specialize in scientific research and education, complete with university campuses and laboratories. It could accommodate large telescopes of space research and a large adjoining planetarium, as well as a massive air and space museum, and maybe a museum of natural history. It could accommodate large auditoriums and theaters for concerts and performing arts.

Those are my ideas. What do you think?
 

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Frankly I don't think Negev is a good place for a large city.
It would require massive amounts of energy for AC,water supplies and still it would be pretty uncomfortable outside during the daytime.
Even Beer Sheva isn't that great for living.
Anything beyond Beer Sheva would be pretty intolerable imo.
 

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The mountainous areas in the Negev have much better weather, similar to Jerusalem. The problem is, they're even further from the center. You will indeed need a lot of infrastructure to get water there, but the question is, how to you start a new city in the middle of nowhere and still get people to move in? Other than Las Vegas, which won people over with the gambling tourism business, I don't know of any similar success stories.
 

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Las Vegas had another reason for its flourishing actually :)
Just to remind, Nevada nuclear test site is pretty close (by American standards anyway).
The main thing, there is no reason to do all that.
We have the seashore which has easy connection to outside world, a more temperate climate,developed infrastructure etc.
All that doesn't mean that we shouldn't invest in periphery.
But the main investment should be in better transportation so people in Negev can easily reach major cities (be it Beer Sheva or Tel Aviv).
On the other hand moving army bases to Negev is a great idea because it frees up a very expensive land in the country center and because it will provide jobs for residents of the southern region which they sorely need.
It also makes sense from a strategic point of view (not to put all eggs in one basket).
 

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we really dont need futuristic cities and answers to anything else
the money can go to developing existing cities with more rail, brt,
replacing old housing with new, new museums, hospitals, airports,
schools and so on.
I would like to see more environmental city plans with more solar
panels, zero energy suburbs and renewable energy (not just gas)
this is something that must be integral to every new building
Beer Sheva should continue building its metro parks and create
the plan for a year round river.
 

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Frankly I don't think Negev is a good place for a large city.
It would require massive amounts of energy for AC,water supplies and still it would be pretty uncomfortable outside during the daytime.
Even Beer Sheva isn't that great for living.
Anything beyond Beer Sheva would be pretty intolerable imo.
If there's an economic reason for the city, then it will succeed, regardless of climate.

The climate for Singapore is far more inhospitable. Humidity never falls below 60%, and overnight temperatures never fall below 23 °C.

Yet the city flourishes, and was flourishing before the invention of air-conditioning.

Cities in the desert have been done many times - of course, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, etc.

But because there were economic reasons for them.
 

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The city could specialize in scientific research and education, complete with university campuses and laboratories. It could accommodate large telescopes of space research and a large adjoining planetarium, as well as a massive air and space museum, and maybe a museum of natural history. It could accommodate large auditoriums and theaters for concerts and performing arts.

Those are my ideas. What do you think?
I think it's more fun to imagine an artificial island built off the coast. Or land reclamation - 35% of the landmass of the Netherlands is land artificially reclaimed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The mountainous areas in the Negev have much better weather, similar to Jerusalem. The problem is, they're even further from the center. You will indeed need a lot of infrastructure to get water there, but the question is, how to you start a new city in the middle of nowhere and still get people to move in? Other than Las Vegas, which won people over with the gambling tourism business, I don't know of any similar success stories.
There is a proposal to build a canal from Med sea to the Dead Sea. This project alone will create hydroelectric energy, while replenishing the Dead Sea. It would also include desalinated drinking water. Maybe if this canal could run south, it might open the Negev to development. This city could tap into it for water and electricity. Solar and wind power farms could also be used, as the desert would be ideal for solar and a mountainous region ideal for wind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think it's more fun to imagine an artificial island built off the coast. Or land reclamation - 35% of the landmass of the Netherlands is land artificially reclaimed.
I feel Israel needs a city to show off its internal technology, innovation, and art. Negev is challenging. Challenges by definition require innovation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If there's an economic reason for the city, then it will succeed, regardless of climate.

The climate for Singapore is far more inhospitable. Humidity never falls below 60%, and overnight temperatures never fall below 23 °C.

Yet the city flourishes, and was flourishing before the invention of air-conditioning.

Cities in the desert have been done many times - of course, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, etc.

But because there were economic reasons for them.
As far as reasons go, that's why I suggested science and space research. A whole industry can come of it, while its facilities could become tourists attractions. Just like how Hollywood, California has its film industry. The film industry itself there has become a tourist attraction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
we really dont need futuristic cities and answers to anything else
the money can go to developing existing cities with more rail, brt,
replacing old housing with new, new museums, hospitals, airports,
schools and so on.
I would like to see more environmental city plans with more solar
panels, zero energy suburbs and renewable energy (not just gas)
this is something that must be integral to every new building
Beer Sheva should continue building its metro parks and create
the plan for a year round river.
But, here you have a chance to start with a clean slate. Design the urban plan for the innovation you have in mind, not the other way around... Which brings up the question I want to brainstorm: What innovation, what really hasn't been tried before on a commercial scale, what new ideas in urbanism can we experiment with...

For starters, how about no roads. It can be designed around a PRT system. We can have Israeli companies create and develop it and test it here. If the test is successful and they can find customers for it, they can manufacture it at the city and sell it cities world-wide....
 

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@chali1 you are right that cities have been built even in worse conditions.
But there was always a reason for building a city.
For Singapore the reason was its prime location at the crossroads of British Empire trade routes.
This role was preserved once China came into power and became the manufacturing center of the world.
Dubai and Abu Dhabi are bad examples because if you take a really close and hard look, you will find out those cities only came into being because some rich people with a large ego wanted to have a city like "those Westerners".
In psychology this is called "Cargo cult" (Google it).
I can give you a reverse example.
In South America (in Brasil mostly) there were once big cities that were built because of the booming demand for rubber trees.
Just like Singapore they were built because there was a commercial demand.
But once the demand declined these cities disappeared because other then that particular demand there was no need for a large city in the middle of the jungle.
Singapore also survived because it had smart management and because it succeeded in diversifying its economy.
I believe the same is destined to happen with Dubai and Abu Dhabi once the demand for oil declines.
As some wise shiekh once remarked:
"My father rode a camel,I ride a Mercedes and my son will ride a camel again".
Now Israel doesn't have financial or human resources to build a city in the middle of the desert just because it will look good on posters.
There needs to be a really good reason (economy based one) for such city to exist.
At this moment I fail to see it.
 

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There needs to be a really good reason (economy based one) for such city to exist.
At this moment I fail to see it.
Well, for one, how about cheap and available land for developers (residential and commercial) to build on? Be'er Sheva is what, 100km from Tel Aviv? In today's world that's nothing. In many metro areas this would be considered a suburb. In fact, given the tiny size of Israel, in terms of transport logistics, every town in Israel can be considered a suburb. So the only comparative advantage for a town in Israel, really comes down to the price and availability of land (assuming equal competency in the municipal bureaucracy).
 

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Search Masdar city,if anything, this is is the city of the future. Its built on a desert too!
 
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