SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Despite our love of cities on the skyscraper board, there is no really solid "back to the city" movement taking place in the United States, nor has suburbia (for all its negatives) lost its appeal with vast numbers of people.

But if a new urbanism and a new degree of vibrancy hasn't done the trick of creating an urban tide of growth, can the current (and future) cost of gasoline do the trick?

If gas rises to $5+ per gallon, what will this mean for urban America in its relationship with suburban, exurban, and rural America? Will those low cost of housing on the fringes of our metropolitan areas look a lot less inviting when the cost of driving negates any gain from the relatively low cost of real estate?

Will gas and oil cause a real and necessary urban rebirth in America?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
872 Posts
I can't speak for the nation on this issue but here in the OKC metro gas prices have started driving, or I should say enhancing, an urban revitalization. There has already arisen serious demand by people all over the OKC metro for major expansions in the city's Metro Transit bus system to reduce dependency on the interstates and high gas prices are enhancing the booming condo market in downtown OKC and around the bricktown neighborhood. So I would say that based on my experience, yes increased gasoline prices are causing an urban rebirth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,034 Posts
Probably, but it's not going to happen overnight. It may even take 10-20 years at this rate just to get a solid trend going. Besides which, I think there was a general swing back towards city living by both the young & old beginning already anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
this was a scare back during the oil embargo. Ethanol will save us all!! ;) (j/k)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
HoustonTexas said:
this was a scare back during the oil embargo. Ethanol will save us all!! ;) (j/k)
Less dependent on the gas and oil by switching to the alternative sources like the Ethonal will bring back our economy and re-energized our urban developments!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
^ naw, doubt it. people will do a lot of stupid sh*t to be able to pay for gas... move further away to cheaper homes (really ironic, in context), cut back on other things like eating out, expensive electronics, extravegant vacations, etc. anything not a necessity in order to be able to continue driving. Its an addiction... you feed it at the cost of the rest of your life.

I mean, some people on the more sane end of the spectrum will probably move near mass transit, drive sparingly, and walk more, but not too many. In oder for the public to really begin demanding and actually using mass transit, gas prices has to go astronomical... something like $10+ a gallon (which it inevitably will). Then, people will realize what a misallocation of resources suburbia really has been. A half century mistake.

glad im not a part of it ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
Rivernorth said:
^ naw, doubt it. people will do a lot of stupid sh*t to be able to pay for gas... move further away to cheaper homes (really ironic, in context), cut back on other things like eating out, expensive electronics, extravegant vacations, etc. anything not a necessity in order to be able to continue driving. Its an addiction... you feed it at the cost of the rest of your life.

I mean, some people on the more sane end of the spectrum will probably move near mass transit, drive sparingly, and walk more, but not too many. In oder for the public to really begin demanding and actually using mass transit, gas prices has to go astronomical... something like $10+ a gallon (which it inevitably will). Then, people will realize what a misallocation of resources suburbia really has been. A half century mistake.

glad im not a part of it ;)
Well, if what you are saying is true:"driving is addiction", then I think that alternative resources for the gas and oil are rather important, when done with the transition to the alternatives, addicts can still DRIVE without scrafice their fourtunes for Monopolized nations and companies! I say that it is time to cut our depedency on foriegn oil and feed our car with corn ethonal alike! :)
 

·
1981 Civic
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
Although we seriously need to cut our dependency on foreign oil, some people will chop off an arm just to keep paying for gas for their 8 mpg Expedition (not me thoughh). In the end, I think it will cause a rebirth of our cities, all indications now look to that possibility. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,670 Posts
Of course its also just as likely to have an opposite effect. Suburban workers demand that the jobs move out to the suburbs to be closer to them.
I'll be moving in a couple of months and facing the situation where I'll be living in a dense urban environment in the city but having to trek out to the suburbs every day to work in a suburban office park. In this case its the move to the city that is causing me to spend more money on gas.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,190 Posts
I don't see this ever happening.

Oil prices alone will not make Americans move back to the cities. There are other percieved factors that will keep Americans out, like bad schools, crime...etc. We will probably see people just cutting back on other excesses. People will probably take more trains and buses, but there won't be a mass migration back to the cities.

It's too intergrated in the American lifestyle...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
sargeantcm said:
Probably, but it's not going to happen overnight. It may even take 10-20 years at this rate just to get a solid trend going. Besides which, I think there was a general swing back towards city living by both the young & old beginning already anyways.
What you said made a lot of sense. This trend of young professionals and empty-nesters moving back into the city started way before these gas prices got out of hand. It started in the mid-to-late '90s. This is a trend that's going on right now, and will probably continue to happen for some time, even if gas prices do go back down to normal levels. Just like the mass exodus to the suburbs in the post-WWII era that lasted into the '80s, people desiring city living is the thing, because of the fact that people (mainly the single young professionals who desire less space and don't want to get married right away) want to be closer to the center of activity, which the 'burbs' definately do not offer.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top