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King of Bernicia
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Watching the match last night and Japanese TV said something which really annoyed me and has been becoming more and more common in recent years....when speaking of Newcastle United calling them/the fans "Geordies". This....is just utterly wrong. I'm a Geordie but I'm a Sunderland fan, as are many Geordies.

I guess it comes back to my old moan about a lack of a unified North Eastern identity.
 

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Part Time Contributor
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Watching the match last night and Japanese TV said something which really annoyed me and has been becoming more and more common in recent years....when speaking of Newcastle United calling them/the fans "Geordies". This....is just utterly wrong. I'm a Geordie but I'm a Sunderland fan, as are many Geordies.

I guess it comes back to my old moan about a lack of a unified North Eastern identity.

Geordie = born within a mile of the river Tyne on both sides :cheers:
 

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Geordieologist
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Yesterday's derby game reminded me that there was a time when everyone in the north east considered themselves Geordies - including Sunderland fans, who all sang proudly of being Geordies at the 1973 FA Cup Final.

They only began to seriously embrace Mackem-hood around 1992, in response to Sir John Hall's statement that Newcastle was at the heart of a 'Geordie Nation'.

It's not surprising that Sunderland fans should take exception to this and seek an identity of their own, but it is odd that they should choose a title for themselves that was coined by people from Newcastle who were taking the piss out of them.
 

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The Legend
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Geordie is a reference to people from the Tyneside area of which Newcastle is the major city and pretty much the centre of everything. A Mackem is reference to someone from the Sunderland area, of course not all people from Tyneside will support Newcastle and not all people from Sunderland will support Sunderland, in some cases the opposite is true. Statistically though people from Tyneside will probably support Newcastle, and people from Sunderland will support Sunderland. I wonder if Mackems from Sunderland who support Newcastle will also get angered with Mackems being referred to as Sunderland fans?

The same could be said for people outside of Manchester who support one of the Manchester clubs, the list can go on and on. It's not really something that should be dwelled on too much.
 

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Part Time Contributor
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Geordie is a reference to people from the Tyneside area of which Newcastle is the major city and pretty much the centre of everything. A Mackem is reference to someone from the Sunderland area, of course not all people from Tyneside will support Newcastle and not all people from Sunderland will support Sunderland, in some cases the opposite is true. Statistically though people from Tyneside will probably support Newcastle, and people from Sunderland will supposrt Sunderland. I wonder if Mackems from Sunderland who support Newcastle will also get angered with Mackems being referred to as Sunderland fans?

The same could be said for people outside of Manchester who support one of the Manchester clubs, the list can go on and on. It's not really something that should be dwelled on too much.
Perhaps its just a case of being secure in one's skin knowing that you are a Geordie or a Mackem :cheers:
 

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King of Bernicia
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Geordie is a reference to people from the Tyneside area of which Newcastle is the major city and pretty much the centre of everything. A Mackem is reference to someone from the Sunderland area, of course not all people from Tyneside will support Newcastle and not all people from Sunderland will support Sunderland, in some cases the opposite is true. Statistically though people from Tyneside will probably support Newcastle, and people from Sunderland will supposrt Sunderland. I wonder if Mackems from Sunderland who support Newcastle will also get angered with Mackems being referred to as Sunderland fans?

The same could be said for people outside of Manchester who support one of the Manchester clubs, the list can go on and on. It's not really something that should be dwelled on too much.
Since Newcastle got lucky and were well on top when football broke big in the 90s things are different these days but traditionally south Tyneside was heavily Sunderland supporting.

Sunderland fans being called mackems....you know, that doesn't annoy me so much. Maybe because I just plain hardly ever hear it when talking about Sunderland people in general. Since I was a kid I've known it as purely a term for Sunderland fans (and not that common a one either), it was only well into my teenage years I learned the people from Sunderland meaning.
I have very little connection with Sunderland, have mostly only been there for games. Sunderland though is the team of Co.Durham so Sunderland till I die.

Its not for footballing reasons that I dislike this use of geordie. Its for greater cultural reasons and the ongoing rotting away of north eastern identity.


Yesterday's derby game reminded me that there was a time when everyone in the north east considered themselves Geordies - including Sunderland fans, who all sang proudly of being Geordies at the 1973 FA Cup Final.

They only began to seriously embrace Mackem-hood around 1992, in response to Sir John Hall's statement that Newcastle was at the heart of a 'Geordie Nation'.
How we've regressed when we should have been incorporating. :(

I'm a fan of pushing the overarching term of Bernician for north easterners.

It's not surprising that Sunderland fans should take exception to this and seek an identity of their own, but it is odd that they should choose a title for themselves that was coined by people from Newcastle who were taking the piss out of them.

Geordie = born within a mile of the river Tyne on both sides :cheers:
I've not heard that one.
Geordie to me means from the coal mining areas around Newcastle, so technically not even from Newcastle itself, though of course the city nicks it and this leads to another definition of meaning just from Newcastle.
 

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I don't really like being labelled a Geordie. Especially if it's related to be a Newcastle United fan. I don't think it sounds very nice. I'm not going to kick off about it, but if I had the choice, I would probably prefer not to be. I just wouldn't go around saying I'm a Geordie, almost making it a massive part of my identity. I know someone who does do that now that he has moved away. Strange how at home, he had a fairly neutral accent, now he sounds like he's been working in a shipyard for years. He loves labelling himself a Geordie. I'd rather be someone from Newcastle than a Geordie. If that makes sense.

I went to give blood earlier this year in London instead of going to the church on Heaton Road as I normally would, and when I spoke to the nurse who checks your iron levels etc. she said something like "oh, I was looking forward to hearing your voice after your seeing your address".

Then I was talking to a GP a few weeks ago about some boring crap about a scar, and the first thing he said rather than answering, was "so you're from the north; a geordie".

I get a load of 'banter' at work with it. Managers talking to me in their crap attempts of doing an accent all the time. According to them my accent is really thick, whereas in a library once, the man told me it was obvious I wasn't local, but not so obvious that I was from Newcastle. Mind you, I don't get it from people in lectures which I suppose is a relief since I spend most of my time there, though they do sometimes mishear things. Most people struggle to grasp things such as "fancy coming with us/is/iz" for example, rather than "me". Or when I say 'wu' instead of 'us'. They think I'm thick if I say 'me mam' and not 'my mum'.


I was reading a play aloud the other day (A Doll's House by Ibsen) and started speaking proper. Saying something like darnce and not dance and stuff like that. I don't think it suited me very well. I did the same with Hamlet.


I do like how we have a second person plural. I love the distinction between 'you' and 'yous'.
 

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The Legend
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My brother (one from up here) now lives with a lot of my other family in Doncaster. To his girl friend, her mates, and his mates he is known a Geordie. To them he has a rather thick accent but to me and other members of my family we have noticed that in the years he's lived there he has started to talk a bit like a Yorkshireman and say a lot of local words.

In our family we have a long running argument about what a kitchen worktop is called, of course those of us from Newcastle refer to it as a "bench" where as those of us from Doncaster refer to it as a "side".
 

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Definition of a Geordie

I suppose it can be dependent on whether you are local or not.

People in other areas call anyone from the NE Geordie to their chagrin :eek:hno:

What about 'Novocastrian'?

Perhaps a 'real' Geordie is born within the roar of St James' Park i.e me!!
 

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I have seen Holmlands on old maps of the area. When George Wimpey marketted Haswell Gardens it was called "Holmlands"

Speaking as someone born in 1970 in the City and County of Newcastle upon Tyne, i have an off topic question. Are you lot with your North Shields/Preston/District of Tynemouth/ birth certificates Geordies? My wife - born 1981 in Ashington - has the uninspiring "Wansbeck" on her B Cert.

As for boundaries it is interesting. My Parents died in Rake Lane and I am sure it says North Shields on the death certificates. I would put Rake Lane as Whitley Bay or possibly Monkseaton. What is behind? Billy Mill? I suppose technically behind, going up towards the roundabout is North Shields. As for Foxhunters, definately Whitley Bay.

I met someone from "North Shields" recently and obviously struck up a conversation with them about where in North Shields. Their answer, Marden Farm, and from what I could gather the Foxhunters end a stone's throw from Whitley Bay FC. I'd have made Marden Farm Cullercoats.

is it true, did they actually move the NE30 boundary to Monkswood which is laughingly described as Tynemouth. So far West I would call it Greater Carlisle! :)
 

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Modern Antiquarian
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I have seen Holmlands on old maps of the area. When George Wimpey marketted Haswell Gardens it was called "Holmlands"

Are you lot with your North Shields/Preston/District of Tynemouth/ birth certificates Geordies?
Which old maps? I am sure Wimpey just got the name from the old nursing home, but that must have got it from somewhere too.

Your 'Geordie' question is interesting. Coming from Tynemouth I have always had a slight hesitation about calling myself a Geordie and so being too closely associated with 'Satan's satellites' in Newcastle.
 

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The Legend
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Yes we are Geordies. I don't think theirs many people who don't class themselves as a one. I think most us all realise that if your from Whitley Bay, Tynemouth, North Shields, Tynemouth-fringe then it's no matter. It is all pretty much Newcastle suburbs.
 
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