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Fascinating. Was that part of the Altstadt rebuilt at some point before WWII? Cause these houses look surprisingly good, with straight facades, windows and all.
 

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Quite a few of these houses pictured still exist, mainly those around the Hans im Glück Brunnen. Not sure about them being rebuilt/restored before the war. I've never seen anything about it.

It's a shame what happened to Stuttgart. Bombers tried numerous times to destroy the city centre from 1942 onwards, but were usually hampered by bad visibility and missed their marked. It wasn't until late 1944 that they finally succeeded, though the firestorm that resulted was devastating and destroyed almost all of the city centre and old town. A few more months of luck and much more of the city's important cultural heritage would have come out in better shape.

It's also a shame that a lot of what could've been saved was demolished anyway, and even more urban fabric was torn up to widen roads. There are still many really beautiful pockets of Stuttgart that are very telling of how charming the city as a whole must have been once.
 

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Quite a few of these houses pictured still exist, mainly those around the Hans im Glück Brunnen. Not sure about them being rebuilt/restored before the war. I've never seen anything about it.

It's a shame what happened to Stuttgart. Bombers tried numerous times to destroy the city centre from 1942 onwards, but were usually hampered by bad visibility and missed their marked. It wasn't until late 1944 that they finally succeeded, though the firestorm that resulted was devastating and destroyed almost all of the city centre and old town. A few more months of luck and much more of the city's important cultural heritage would have come out in better shape.

It's also a shame that a lot of what could've been saved was demolished anyway, and even more urban fabric was torn up to widen roads. There are still many really beautiful pockets of Stuttgart that are very telling of how charming the city as a whole must have been once.
Interesting. Are there any reconstruction plans in the pipeline for Stuttgart? Not trying to stir the pot at all, but do you happen to know of any literature regarding the destruction of German city centres/cultural heritage etc?
 

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Interesting. Are there any reconstruction plans in the pipeline for Stuttgart? Not trying to stir the pot at all, but do you happen to know of any literature regarding the destruction of German city centres/cultural heritage etc?
Jörg Friedrich has written a book "The Fire: The Bombing of Germany, 1940–1945" (also in Finnish: Suuri palo). I haven't read it myself but based on the reviews it should give an overview of the architectural/cultural losses in addition to the description of the bombing campaigns.
 

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Jörg Friedrich has written a book "The Fire: The Bombing of Germany, 1940–1945" (also in Finnish: Suuri palo). I haven't read it myself but based on the reviews it should give an overview of the architectural/cultural losses in addition to the description of the bombing campaigns.
This is a decent book. There are definitely omissions (e.g. from memory Jörg asserts that the first purposeful bombing of civilians was carried out by the British, which ignores certain German bombings during the invasion of Poland, such as at Wieluń) and the tone is sometimes maybe a bit strong and not as objective as it could be. Broadly though, it does detail the bombing campaign quite well, if hard details are what you're looking for.
 

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Most of these buildings exist today, the imperial castle lost the upper part of the tower and some of the turrets, especially on the west side. The castle was transformed quite significantly in Nazi times (1939-1943). The buildings of the Königliche Akademie zu Posen (1903-1919) (University of Poznań since 1919) are almost intact.
 

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Yes, Leipzig is a relatively young city as it's buildings go. I don't know if Leipzig just used to be really small before indutrialization and thus never had much of an old town to begin with or if the existing old town was just replaced by newer buildings in the boom period but nowadays Leipzig has hardly any buildings from before 1700-1800 or so.
 

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Leipzig was a major trading center in the early modern period and a relatively large city of the Holy Roman Empire. Around 1600 it had a population of about 17 000 (slightly less than Frankfurt), which put it among the top 20 cities in the empire I think. I believe that a large part of its historical center was rebuilt toward the end of the 19th century/early 20th century, which made Leipzig more modern and thus slightly less vulnerable to firebombing. Somewhat similar situations in Munich and Hamburg also (partially) explain why these three cities fared better than those places with ancient old towns, such as Frankfurt or Nuremberg.
 

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Another interesting wiki resource is the list of cultural and architectural monuments from the city. There's a list for virtually every German city, and it usually shows pictures of the buildings and the year of construction. They're really useful for seeing how many old buildings are left in each town.

Here's the list for Leipzig's old town:
Liste der Kulturdenkmale in Leipzig-Zentrum – Wikipedia

Having looked at many of these lists, I believe Leipzig has one of the best preserved historical centers among large German cities. Most of the buildings are quite big for an 'old town' and date from the late 19th to the early 20th century.
 
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