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Leipzig got bombed comperatively little, so destruction was limited compared to many other cities. Nevertheless the old town doesn't really appear "old" by German standards. However, the limited destruction in the center and the wide swathes of preserved Gründerzeit districts probably make Leipzig the most beautiful 500K+ city in Germany.
 

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I feel Leipzig old town, while sustaining comparatively little damage during the war, was 'hit where it hurt' -- i.e. the damage that was done was dealt in significant spots where one can really feel the disruption to the historic fabric. A good example of this is the area north-east of the Markt, which once used to home to many important baroque townhouses but it now just a bit too empty and full of monolithic post-war buildings.

Open spaces were also created in certain sections of the old town, which makes it feel less 'cozy' I supposed.

As for the relative 'modernity' of Leipzig's old town, I think it was primarily composed of renaissance and baroque townhouses before the 19th century, when a lot of the old town area was modernised (due to the city's wealth and standing at the time). Despite that and the destruction of the war, there are quite a lot of nice older buildings in Leipzig, especially from the baroque period. These in particular are often very reminiscent of those that once existed en-masse in Dresden. It's a shame the eastern side of Katherinenstraße was destroyed, because I think this street in particular probably rivalled any of the great baroque streets in Dresden.
 

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I feel Leipzig old town, while sustaining comparatively little damage during the war, was 'hit where it hurt' -- i.e. the damage that was done was dealt in significant spots where one can really feel the disruption to the historic fabric. A good example of this is the area north-east of the Markt, which once used to home to many important baroque townhouses but it now just a bit too empty and full of monolithic post-war buildings.
Hopefully some reconstructions could be done in the future to restore this area. There would be a lot less work compared to Dresden or Frankfurt with far more effective results in terms of a unified urban fabric.
 

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Hopefully some reconstructions could be done in the future to restore this area. There would be a lot less work compared to Dresden or Frankfurt with far more effective results in terms of a unified urban fabric.
Unfortunately I think some of the buildings along this stretch are relatively new or have been renovated recently. There are places in Leipzig where reconstructions could work though.
 

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It depends very much on citizen initiatives. I'm sure there is latent will in a lot of cities, but no one has taken the initiative to actually concentrate it in a tangible manner.
 

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Potsdam seen from the Brauhausberg, c. 1930

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From Google Earth, I can tell the city slaughterhouse, the buildings to the left of the first pic, existed until ~ 2010. The building in the foreground, with the little tower at the corner, seems to still stand, although I cannot find what it is.

In the last photo, you can see part of the old Hauptbahnhof, to the right, and the water tower that exists to this day.
 

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The first picture is of Frederick the Great's bedchamber in Schloss Monbijou (room 24 in the Hohenzollernmuseum guide). The second one is supposed to also be Monbijou, and while certain elements match Room 25 (lsuch as the floor and furniture like the throne, the canopy and the dog portraits), but the Rococo panelling and bookshelves are completely absent in pictures of said room.
 

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Interesting photos of the Schloss Monbijou. Does anyone know if the collections and removable parts of the interior survived the war and their possible whereabouts nowadays? Wikipedia says just that "Large parts of the collections had been evacuated, and after the war were looted and brought to the Soviet Union and other places."
 

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My guess is that a part of the collections either ended up in custody of the SPSG - such as of the Prussian Crown Jewels (that were on display at Monbijou treasury and are now at Charlottenburg) and the throne curtain you can see above - or were returned to the House of Hohenzollern. I can't say to what extent, but as I read, contents of the palace had been evacuated first to the Bernterode mine and then to Marburg, Hessen, in the US occupation zone. If the Soviets managed to put their hands on the Monbijou collection, I would say it was a small part of it. Other examples I found are Gaertner's paintings Spittelmarkt (now in Sanssouci) and the Panorama von Berlin (parts of it now in Charlottenburg), that were displayed at Room 6.

It would be nice, if someone else recognises other artworks in the old photos, to post them (perhaps not on this thread but on one dedicated to the palace, if that would be more appropriate).
 

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Chemnitz

Once a handsome industrial city on the northern edge of the Ore Mountains, and the third largest in Saxony, the city-centre of Chemnitz was almost totally destroyed in a series of raids in February and March 1945. Prior to this the city had been essentially untouched, and the built-up central districts were perfectly preserved. Such a shame it was destroyed so late in the war.
















 

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Not sure if this is the right thread for this but whatever.

Residential buildings by year of construction:

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A comparison of states reveals a considerable age gap between the East and West. The eastern states have a much larger proportion of old buildings built before 1950 than the western states. By contrast, the buildings and dwellings built between 1950 and 1989 are proportionally less significant in the eastern states. The difference is somewhat smaller for dwellings in this age segment than for buildings, because although fewer buildings were constructed in the east between 1950 and 1989, most of these are larger multi-family houses. This can also be seen when comparing the average number of dwellings: whereas in the western states a residential building built between 1950 and 1989 contains on average 2.1 dwellings, in the eastern states the average is 3.6 dwellings.
 

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It sometimes easy to forget that despite some well-publicised instances of war-time devastation (e.g. Dresden), the area that would become East Germany as a whole fared much better than the Western states in terms of destruction. The damage that did happen here typically occurred near the very end of the war (e.g. Dresden, Chemnitz, Magdeburg, Plauen, Nordhausen, Jena, Halle, Halberstadt, Zerbst, Zwickau) -- with the notable exceptions of Berlin, Leipzig (which is still probably the best preserved large city anyway), and Rostock. Many towns in Brandenburg/Mecklenburg-Vorpommern would likewise be fine if the Soviets hadn't needlessly sacked and burned them. Even then, many of these cities in the east still have extensive, well preserved Gründerzeit districts.

If the war had magically ended on 1 January 1945, most of East Germany's cultural heritage would have been preserved. Whereas a lot of important western towns and cities had already been extensively bombed by this point.
 

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If the war had magically ended on 1 January 1945, most of East Germany's cultural heritage would have been preserved. Whereas a lot of important western towns and cities had already been extensively bombed by this point.
Maybe it could be that, if the soldiers of the Red Army were bored with burning entire districts and cities (consider the example of Danzig/Gdańsk, Kwidzyn/Marienwerder and other Pomeranian cities)
 

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The fundamental problem is that according to Manfred Gerner 80% of the more than 2 million half-timbered buildings in Germany have been plastered, while a significant amount of Gründerzeit buildings have been deplastered.

Half-timbered buildings in Eppertshausen:
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Gründerzeit buildings in Berlin:
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Tell someone that about 40% of Berlin's residential buildings are actually pre-war, they would never believe you.
 
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