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Munich still has a lot of pre-war buildings in the Altstadt. As with Hamburg, for instance, you can look at the wikipedia list of architectural monuments in the old town district and you can see just how many such buildings still exist. It's a bit hard to compare the lists for different cities, mostly because their cityscapes are characterized by different house types; an elegant early 20th century department store from Hamburg is larger than 6 or 7 town houses from smaller cities, but only counts as one in the list; how the old town district is defined is also debatable. Nonetheless, from the several lists that I scrolled, and accounting for the size and nature of each city center, I think Luebeck, Aachen, Regensburg, Goerlitz, Augsburg, Halle, Munich, Hamburg, Leipzig, Karlsruhe, Nuremberg, Ulm, Bonn and even Bremen and Braunschweig still have a significant number of pre-war buildings in their centers; of course this varies from high densities in Regensburg or Halle to more concentrated pockets in Ulm or Nuremberg, but it's not all THAT bad! And I only looked at a few lists and there are countless other cities, often smaller, that are very well-preserved as well.
 

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Moin Moin
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"On April 29-30, 1945, the US Army invaded the city and fights broke out. Munich was badly scarred by 73 air raids (1940-1945). There were 6,632 deaths, 45% of the building fabric was destroyed, in the city center about 60%. Due to the economic rise of the city, the number of inhabitants grew to 1,279,405 by 1968. The reconstruction of the Old Town according to a plan by Karl Meitinger took place in traditional building forms with widened streets. Traffic was reorganized and satellite settlements were built on the outskirts of the city. The 1972 Summer Olympics marked the symbolic conclusion of the reconstruction and triggered a new surge in development."

- total destruction or severe damage:
 - 21,000 buildings, including 274 cultural buildings
 - 9,155 residential buildings with 71,800 apartments (27.4% of pre-war stock)
 - 108 of the 206 churches and chapels
- slight damage:
 - 39,098 buildings
- Area damage:
 - entire urban area 45% destroyed
 - in 9 districts destruction of more than 50% of the building fabric
 - 60% of the old town destroyed
 - 74% destroyed in the central station area
 - 70% destroyed in Westschwabing
- undamaged:
 - 1,270 buildings (2.1% of the 60,098 buildings in Munich)
- Total destruction:
 - 90% of the railroad facilities
 - 50% of hospitals, clinics and schools
 - 50% of the postal facilities
 - 40% of administrative buildings
 - over 5 million cubic meters of rubble on the roads (roughly the volume of 2 Cheops pyramids)

Now add post-war planning on top of that...
 

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It looks incredibly "modern" even to 21st century eyes. Usually, when you see early modern architecture you can still see that it is somehow "old" in the sense that you see features that let you pinpoint the building roughly to a certain era, i.e. late 20ies or something. Even the highly modern twin buildings at the Alexanderplatz (Alexander- and Berolinahaus) from 1929 can nevertheless be clearly identified as "pre-war".

But this really looks like a building from the 1960ies or 1970ies, it could even be from the 2000s when there was a renaissance of this reduced modern architecture, at least in Germany.

It's not that I find it beautiful, it looks rather drab, to be honest, but I'm still impressed by its "modernity".
 

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They still be building same craps and be like : look how modern and creative we are ! Even though same thing existed 100 years ago !
Architecture really went to heck
 

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Wrocław
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How would you - this question is directed mostly to German friends - describe major differences between pre-war three "similar" cities:
  • Leipzig (707.000 inhabitants in 1939)
  • Dresden (630.000 inhabitants in 1939)
  • Breslau (629.000 inhabitants in 1939)

I wonder about economical, cultural and architectural significance of these three cities in a mind of ordinary German people from other part of Reich.

Greetings! :)

PS. And to fulfill request of historical photos (places from Breslau which are vanished totally after WW2)

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Dresden was definitely the cultural gem. It was the capital of Saxony and had an international standing in the arts. Of course, architecturally it was just as important.
Leipzig was the industrial boomtown. Before industrialization hit, it wasn't a very large or important city but then it exploded. Everything was newly built, there were many factories and huge new residential quarters. The city offered many glitzy new shopping passages and other amenities.
Breslau I'm the least knowledgable about. It has a long history but also expanded quickly during the industrial era. I don't know how significant it was culturally beside obviously being the Silesian hub.
 

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Breslau I'm the least knowledgable about. It has a long history but also expanded quickly during the industrial era. I don't know how significant it was culturally beside obviously being the Silesian hub.
Breslau reached its cultural peak around 1900. Many noble prize winners like chemist Fritz Haber or Max Born were graduates of the Schlesische Friedrichs Wilhelms Universität. Breslau's cultural life was significantly shaped by jewish citizens who were generous, patriotic donators of museums, theatres etc.

After WW1 the city's local authorities promoted Subsidized housing what Breslau made a pioneer beside Frankfurt (among mayor Ludwig Landmann). Silesian architects realised their plans in the suburb of Grüneiche what was lately become known as Werkbundsiedlung.

To sum up: Breslau was always progressive compared to other German cities. You can consider the Jahrhunderthalle (centennial hall) as a symbol of this open-minded spirit, which architect Max Berg called "a cathedral of democracy".
 

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Wrocław
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Maybe it will interest someone, but contemporary Wrocław - in contrary to early post-war times - is not removing evidences of German pre-war heritage.

Renovation process of giving new life for historical buildings includes revealing and preservation of German wall signs.

Furthermore citizens of Wrocław are proud of it, what you can see for instance in the project of making a map of German evidences of old Breslau in contemporary city.

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(you can change subtitles in the video)

Examples of preserved wall signs:

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