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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Positive news for Ghana’s Power sector as General Electric and its partners Endeavour and Finagestion sign a deal for the project dubbed Ghana 1000 project, an integrated gas-to-power initiative which is expected to deliver more than 1,000 MW of electricity to Ghana’s national grid from 2017. It’s a silver lining against the backdrop of further power ration in the next ten months because the Government, and in particular the Volta River Authority, lacks spare capacity to replace plants shut down for repair. Ghana currently is able to supply 2,000 MW of power out of the installed capacity of 2,800 because of ongoing maintenance on plants. This has had the knock on effect of inflation surges on utilities which are at a re-cord high. Figures from the Ghana Statistical Service indicate that inflation for the month of April 2014 has increased from 14.5 percent in March to 14.7 percent. This is, so far, the high-est since April 2010. In other news, a report just released by Global Financial Integrity, has shown that the Government of Ghana lost potential tax revenue of US3.86 billion between 2002 and 2011. The report said the under-invoicing of exports was the primary method for shifting money illicitly out of the country while the under-invoicing of imports was used mainly to illegally smuggle capital into the country. As a result of these illicit financial deals, Ghana’s tax loss has been put at roughly 11 percent of total government revenue during the 10 year period. It is a devastating loss that is shared by many sub-Saharan countries and it should be a priority for heads of state’s list to cooperate in order to dramatically reduce the thriving business. President Mahama, last week, attended the World Economic Forum and engaged in a discussion with Nigerian President Jonathan Goodluck over terrorist threat concerns sparked by Boko Haram’s abduction of over 200 school girls in the north-eastern Borno State. As Chairman of ECOWAS the Ghanaian President rightly said that any threat to the stability of Nigeria is a threat to the region.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
President Mahama, recently back from South Africa where he attended President Zuma’s inauguration, holds the first ECOWAS meeting in Accra since he has be-come the organisation’s chairman. The emergency meeting was called to discuss the Boko Haram threat to Nigeria, and the west African region as a whole, as well as other regional matters. The President has also made further changes to his Cabinet. The economy continues in its struggle to curb a budget gap that Moody’s Investor’s Service forecast will exceed ten percent of Ghana’s GDP. Finance Minister, Seth Terkper, despite his slightly contradictory comments in the last weeks, has said that Ghana might accept a bailout from the International Monetary Fund in the fu-ture. Ongoing disruptions from the lack of the country’s sufficient gas supply and infrastructure may be lessened in the near future as a result of a memorandum of understanding signed between Equatorial Guinea, Ivory Coast and Ghana which should see the establishment of a regional gas company. Lastly, in a boost to solv-ing Ghana’s infrastructure gap, President Mahama has secured a US$100 million grant from the United Arab Emirates’’ Abu Dhabi Development Fund for the con-struction of various infrastructure projects. Hopefully more agreements will come from the strengthening relationship between the two nations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The President has made further changes to his Cabinet, most notable of which are the replacement of the Minister of Lands and Natural Resources and the Minister of Health. The continued reshuffle is in reaction to criticism fired at the under efficiency of his cabinet, but there are questions around the effectiveness of these changes. The economy continues on a downward trend. The Bank of Ghana said it financed the government’s entire budget deficit in the first quarter, measures that Fitch warned will fuel inflation and weaken Africa’s worst-performing currency. Ghana’s economic woes are undermining investor sentiment, risking the government’s plan to sell a new Eurobond this year. Nevertheless, in a boost to economic moral there have been two important delegation visits this week, from Israel and The Netherlands, both of which produced strengthen economic partnerships and promise of investment. The Government of Ghana signed an agriculture pact with the Government of Israel to boost agriculture production in the country. Seth Terkper, Finance Minister, sticks by his comment made last month that authorities have-n’t ruled out the option of seeking a bailout from the IMF. Meanwhile the Bank of Ghana has scrapped some of the controversial forex rules it implemented in February 2014. Somewhat worryingly, there is an apparent and ongoing trade conflict be-tween Ghana and neighbouring Ivory Coast. The Bureau for International Affairs is trying to find a resolution to the disagreements which is said to be caused by a ban on inland rice importation implemented October 2013 and which has since been lifted. It will be important for President Mahama, also Chairman of ECOWAS, to intervene in order to diffuse the tension between the two countries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ghanaian’s frustration with the worsening state of the economy is growing and protesters taking to the streets of Accra is one demonstration of this. Recent tariff increases on electricity and water as well as a new VAT on financial services are added strains. One of the protesting group’s complaints was government’s inability to kick out incompetent and non-performing appointees which has been a criticism often fired against the National Democratic Congress (NDC). Timely then was President Mahama’s first sweeping cabinet re-shuffle which has seen key ministerial positions change. President Mahama appointed a new Minister of Defence in this reshuffle which also saw the dismissal of the Interior and Agriculture Ministers but left other key portfolios such as Finance and Energy and Petroleum unchanged. President Mahama also realigned parts of the government structure and merged some ministries. Finance Minister, Seth Terkper, presented the Mid-Year Review and Supplementary budget to Parliament to seek approval to spend an extra GH¢3.2 billion to fund additional expenditure in the revised 2014 budget. The government has cut its 2014 economic growth target and forecast, and re-vised the budget deficit and the inflation rate due to falling revenues, the decline of the cedi, and falling gold prices. The Minister said the country’s budget gap would increase to 8.8 percent of GDP and expected economic growth has been lowered to 7.1 percent. He acknowledge the difficulties facing the economy, all reasons behind Moody’s downgrade from B1 to B2, but claims that there is hope for a turnaround of the situation soon if current measures that had been instituted by the government were strictly followed. It seems likely that government will seek a bailout from the IMF and it is now just a matter of delay tactics. A positive development is Parliament’s approval of the Atuabo Free Port Project, a commercial agreement between the government of Ghana, Lonrho Ports Ghana Limited and Atuabo free Port Company Limited. The project is expected to be fully operational in 2016 to meet the logistics and support requirements of Ghana's Oil and Gas industry and the wider Gulf of Guinea region. Once completed it will have a significant impact on the economy of the Western Region, while at the national level, has the potential to attract more foreign investment into the country. Energy Minister, Emmanuel Kofi Buah, commented that the yet-to-be-built Atuabo Free Port, will turn Ghana into an oil and gas hub within the West African sub-region.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ghana continues to maintain a robust multiparty democracy. Although elections are well over two years away, the country seems to be gripped by partisan political fever – overhyped by often sensationalist local media. This has been partly brought about by the current economic dispensation, giving way to rising disillusionment with the political elite. President John Mahama and the ruling National Democratic Congress (NDC) have come under increased pressure over their handling of the economy, which seem particularly lop-sided against traders and labour unions. The recent escalation of increased labour agitations in as many months attests to this. The opposition have amplified the debate and seek to make short term political capital from the impasse. The president would hope that his new cabinet - that are yet to sworn into government - will be better placed to implement his party’s manifesto over the rest of the year. To that end, the president has used his Eid-Ul-Fitr message to restore confidence among Ghanaians, promising to listen and restore business confidence by the end of the year – a promise likely to have electoral ramifications if unfulfilled. Meanwhile, the Central Bank Governor, Dr Kofi Wampah, has said that the Bank has lifted a ban on the importation of foreign currencies by commercial banks; much welcome news for traders and exporters who rely heavily on the dollar. Additionally, Ghana’s oil and gas sector is taking steps to rewrite the agreements it made with oil and gas companies to comply with international best practice. There has long been a feeling among many Ghanaians that they have not benefited from the country's resource boom of recent years. The World Bank’s total support to the sector has reached US$58 million after the Bank decided to approve an additional US$19.80 million to support the development requirements of Ghana’s oil and gas sector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first ever US‑Africa leaders' summit, held in Washington DC on 4 – 6 August, marked an attempt to refocus the US‑Africa relationship towards trade and investment, rather than traditional areas of aid, security, and geopolitics. The summit no doubt highlighted Africa's ongoing emergence as an important economic player, based on rapid Gross Domestic Product (GDP), population and consumption growth. President John Mahama was among African leaders invited to the US-Africa leaders’ summit, and by all accounts had a good summit. The summit could not have come at a better time for the president, whose domestic approval seems to be plummeting, given the wider economic context in the country. Ghana is among the key African countries set to benefit from significant investments, as a result of the summit. The summit will follow up with US$33 billion in new trade and investments that will help “spur African development”. Ghana is one of the six African countries under the Power Africa Initiative that will pay dividends for the country in the medium to long term, supporting the government’s efforts to revive the power sector. The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), is another beneficial policy that has benefited Ghanaian businesses since President Bill Clinton launched it. The hope of the Ghanaian government would be the seamless and long-term renewal of AGOA in a US Congress that is appearing more protectionist in rhetoric at least. Ghana is also set to benefit from a new Security Cooperation arrangement, with the launch a new “Security Governance Initiative to help African countries continue to build strong, professional security forces to provide for their own security” - starting with Kenya, Niger, Mali, Nigeria, Ghana and Tunisia. Additionally, the launch of a new African peacekeeping rapid response partnership with the goal of quickly deploying African peacekeepers in support of U.N. or AU missions is timely; - the US will join with six countries that in recent years have demonstrated a track record as peace-keepers -- Ghana, Senegal, Rwanda, Tanzania, Ethiopia and Uganda. The most significant piece of good news resulted in the signing on the Millennium Challenge Account Second Compact in Washington by Finance Minister, Seth Terkper, which has targeted Ghana’s energy sector for significant investments totaling US$493 million. Despite the President focusing on global issues, the poster boy of Africa in terms of good governance and economic growth announced a return to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a bailout. The president went on the offensive by giving several interviews to international media to clarify Ghana’s position. Meanwhile, back home, annual inflation figures released by the Ghana Statistical Service, put annual inflation at 15.3% in July, much to the annoyance of the Bank of Ghana, and Finance Ministry. Elsewhere, the Inter Ministerial Committee on Ebola has met, and decided on combating the Ebola Virus with GH¢ 6 million to purchase 10,000 supportive gear to combat the virus.
 

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Ghana’s new law could end illegal mining

Cecilia Jamasmie | August 20, 2014

At one point an estimated 50,000 foreign workers were operating unlawfully in Ghana.

The government of Ghana is getting close to pass a new Minerals and Mining Act that seeks to fully regulate the sector could help to effectively deal with illegal mining in the country.

The revised law, GhanaWeb reports, will empower courts to confiscate equipment seized from illicit miners. Currently the state has not been able to hold on to them because existing regulations don’t support that.

MINING.com has kept a close eye on illegal gold mining in Ghana, Africa's second-largest producer of the precious metal. At its peak, an estimated 50,000 foreign workers, mainly Chinese, were operating unlawfully in the country. This prompted the government to create a taskforce in May last year to tackle the subject, and so avoid tension-generating issues, such as the massive deportation of almost two hundred of Chinese nationals last year.

But illicit operations continue to be a major problem in the Ashanti and Eastern regions of the country. According to Ghana News Agency (GNA) indiscriminate digging of deep trenches in frantic search for gold ore has wrecked most roads in the area. This has made especially difficult for health professionals to reach those communities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Friday marked one year since Ghana’s historic Supreme Court judgment. On August 29 2013, Ghana’s highest court dismissed the opposition party’s claims of voter fraud and irregularities, reconfirming the presidency of John Dramani Mahama. Heightened tensions on the day propelled Ghana’s security agencies to deploy approximately 32,000 security officers across the country, before the ruling was read. Although the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) accepted the court’s decision; the courts verdict did not occasion any acts of violence or demonstration – a testament to the country’s stability. The reaffirmation of Ghana’s stable democracy did not have short term benefits for the Mahama administration, but has yielded positive international acclaim for the country since.
The petitioners surmounted a challenge centred around 11,000 identified ‘pink sheets’ (electoral commission statement of results) that raised a number of issues: over-counting, duplicate serial numbers; the absence of signatures from presiding officers; voting without biometric verification; duplicate polling station codes; and unknown polling stations. International professional services/accounting firm, KPMG was tasked to confirm the validity of the number of pink sheet exhibits. The Supreme Court decision underscored the invalidity and errors in the voting process, however, the verdict from the nine member Supreme Court bench rejected the latter three unanimously by the margins of 5:4, 6:3, and 6:3 respectively – quashing claims of systematic bias and complicity on the part of the Electoral Commission (EC) in favour of President Mahama. After an eight month protracted court hearing, the court was commended on the transparency of the entire proceedings. A sustained campaigned by civil society, led by centre right think-tank, Danquah Institute, ensured that court room deliberations were broadcast on television and radio across the country.
A year on, Ghanaians widely accept that the court process bode well for institutional consolidation, which has seen Ghana’s political credentials on the continent entrenched a beacon of democracy. President Mahama nearly mid-way through his term, and nearing six years of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) government, has been riddled by scandals and public discontent, borne out of an underperforming economy, which has dented the presidents image. Meanwhile, the opposition NPP — a party showing signs of struggling with internal ructions — have faced criticism for failing to hold the government to account – focusing instead on internal elections. Meanwhile, Ghana's election commission — under heavy scrutiny for much of the hearings — has said that it will seek to improve its handling of future elections and attempt to minimise many of the issues shown to be present by the pink sheets.
Despite having his mandate to rule confirmed, Mr Mahama has struggled to push his party's policy agenda forward. The economic backdrop has been challenging, with a dire fiscal situation following a pre-election spending splurge, as well as high inflation and a depreciating currency fuelling popular discontent. The administration has also found itself bogged down in a number of scandals, with allegations of large scale misappropriation of funds at the Savannah Accelerated Development Authority and the Ghana Youth Employment and Entrepreneurial Development Agency, as well as claims of a mishandling of a murky takeover of a local bank and poor management of a number of costly public projects. All these issues should have provided ample ammunition for the NPP to hold the government to account and boost its own standing with the electorate. But many opportunities have either missed or degenerated into mud-slinging, serving to fuel a growing strain of cynicism in the electorate and a deep distrust of the political elite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Following on from a story from our last issue, the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) has successfully held its Special Delegates’ Congress on 31 August 2014. The election was to prune down the number of presidential aspirants to five, and resulted in the resounding victory for the twice presidential candidate, Nana Akufo- Addo who took 80.81 percent of the votes. Out of 741 ballots cast, Nana Akufo-Addo polled 598 votes with his closest contender Alan Kyerematen obtaining a tally of 59 votes. Addai Nimoh and Second Deputy Speaker of Parliament Joe Ghartey both obtained 22 votes each while Osei Ameyaw managed 17 votes to pick up the last ticket to the October 18 national delegates’ conference. With the automatic expulsion of the race by Stephen Asamoah Boateng and Dr Konadu Apraku, two more hopefuls Joe Ghartey and Osei Ameyaw have dropped out of the standard bearer contest and pledged their support for Nana Akufo-Addo. The chasm in the opposition seems to be steadily closing up as the October 18 elections beckons.

In other news, The Government of Ghana launched a series of road shows in New York and London aimed at garnering interest for its Eurobond issue. The government aims to tap into international capital markets to plug the large fiscal and external debt the country has contended with since 2012. The seeking of the Eurobond will also refinance some of the 2007 Eurobond Issue that is set to mature in 2017. On 11 September, Ghana successfully sold a US$1 billion Eurobond at a coupon rate of 8.25 percent – in line with other African issues, and has been viewed as positive despite the country’s fiscal difficulties. Indeed, the rate was below many analysts' expectations. The bond repayment will be realised in three tranches of US$333 million in 2024, 2025 and 2026. Ghana’s finance minister, Seth Terkper, told international media that the bond had attracted enormous interest and was oversubscribed to the tune of US$3 billion. With the success of Ghana’s latest bond issues, it seems investors have taken a long term view, despite elections just over the horizon in December 2016. The government announced plans for a bond earlier this year before formally submitting an IMF request. IMF reaction to Ghana’s bond issues is as yet unknown, but we are likely to get an impression, when The Fund visits Ghana on 16 September for feasibility studies. The Fund is expected to push for stringent measure for faster fiscal consolidation – which the government will reluctantly agree to. The finance minister certainly believes that Ghana’s bargaining position with The Fund is now strengthened, declaring that; “it gives us a stronger negotiating position with the IMF”. With the success of the bond issue and the inevitability surrounding the cut to public expenditure, the government will no doubt bear the brunt of minimised public spending as has been characteristic in election years.
Despite this dose of good news, Ghana’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) - August 2014 rate grew year-on-year and stood at 15.9 percent in August 2014, up from 15.3 in July. This was on the face of repeated claims by the Government’s Economic Management Team headed by the Vice president, Kwesi Amissah-Arthur to reduce the surging levels of infla-tion, macro economic conditions, made worse by the slump of the cedi continues to have an adverse impact on consumer prices. In other news, twice opposition vice presidential candidate, and a former deputy governor at the bank of Ghana, Dr Bawumia has accused the Ghana Statistical Survey and the Bank of Ghana for cooking up inflation statistics.

Elsewhere, the Government on 08 September, 2014 – signed a Memorandum of Understanding with IFC, a member of the World Bank Group and the Volta River Authority (VRA), Ghana’s national power generation utility, to support private sector investment in the country’s power sector. The Government’s National Energy Policy, has prioritised the increase of installed generation capacity in the country to 5,000 MW by 2016, as a means of spurring economic growth. Local independent power producers are encouraged by the move – given the significant local content participation as ascribed in law. The Government therefore seeks joint venture partnerships by encouraging private sector investment in the power sector in order to help achieve this objective. Both IFC and VRA have identified a number of generation opportunities to contribute to domestic power supply in line with the National Energy Policy, and will co-operate with the development and financing of VRA’s generation opportunities. These proposed projects will be developed in partnership with internationally reputable and experienced power generation developers. Both parties have agreed to jointly develop and operate power plants on a lower cost basis to ensure delivery of affordable electricity to Ghanaians. Despite the macroeconomic context in-country, the Mahama administration has attracted significant levels of investment into the country’s power sector.

Fed up with waiting for its prime supplier of Nigerian gas to honour its promises, the VRA has begun to look elsewhere for sources. In response to hitches and numerous delays encountered by Nigeria’s state-run N-Gas (which manages the country’s gas exports through the West African Gas Pipeline (WAGP) in complying with a contract to supply 120 cubic feet of gas, VRA, headed by Kirk Koffi, is poised to sign accords with four other Nigerian companies. On top of the positive developments in the wider energy space, Ghana has stated that gas supply from Jubilee field will commence from the end 2014. Russian oil company Lukoil, announced on 2 September the presence of oil and gas at Cape Three Points block. The guarantee of imminent gas is surely an attractive prospect for a country that has 70 percent accessibility to electricity, the best on the continent after South Africa, but is unable to enjoy sustainable output. This latest positive development from Lukoil confirmed after recent drillings will have a 90 day appraisal to confirm whether they are commercially exploitable volumes.
 

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Ghana, U.S. Maritime Forces complete maritime law enforcement operation

Ghana Armed Forces and U.S. Maritime Forces has completed the Africa Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership (AMLEP) operations with the US.

The operation brought together representatives from Ghana’s Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development, the Marine Police Unit of the Ghana Police Service, Ghana Navy, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coastguard on Spearhead, the U.S. Navy’s first Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV).

The operation succeeded in detecting three vessels that were violating Ghanaian maritime law and cited the violators for follow-on judicial action.

“The results of this year’s AMLEP extend beyond the number of boardings and violations of maritime law. The true end result is greater security in Ghana’s exclusive economic zone – security that I am confident will last,” said Rear Adm. Tom Reck, in his closing ceremony remarks.

The U.S. and Ghana have partnered for two successive AMLEP operations over the last two years as part of the Africa Partnership Station (APS) program, an international collaborative maritime security capacity-building program that aims to enforce partner nation maritime law, follow-on prosecution, so that African partners will benefit from revenue that comes from judicial processes.

Credit: American Embassy Ghana
 

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Ghana Navy to visit Cote d'Ivoire

The visit, scheduled on February 25 to 26, would highlights on issues to promote stronger military ties and maritime cooperation between the two countries, after a successful visit by the Ghana Navy to the Republics of Togo and Benin.

The visit would also focus on maritime exercise between the two navies aimed at fighting piracy and armed robbery at sea.

This was in a statement signed by Lieutenant Commander Andy La-Anyane, Deputy Director in charge of Information and Press Relations of GAF and copied to the Ghana News Agency in Accra.

The statement said two Ghana Navy Ships, GNS NAA GBEWAA and GNS CHEMLE as well as the Ghana Navy Regimental Band would also be part of the visit.

"As part of the visit, Rear Admiral Biekro would pay courtesy calls on some senior military officers of Cote d'Ivoire whilst the team will engage its counterpart in games, band display, passage exercises, maritime cooperation discussions, visits to tourist sites amongst others" it said.

Source: GNA
 

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Ghana Home Loans secures five million euro facility

Ghana Home Loans (GHL), the country’s premier mortgage provider, has secured a five million euro facility from the Ghana International Bank plc (GHIB), a Ghanaian owned London-based bank.

The facility is to enable Ghana Home Loans to meet the increasing demand for mortgages by overseas customers.

This was in a statement issued by Kojo Addo-Kufuor, Chief Operations Officer, Ghana Home Loans, and copied to the Ghana News Agency in Accra.

Mr Dominic Adu, the Chief Executive Officer of GHL, said the outfit was elated to close the facility with GHIB as it gave Ghana Home Loans a stronger platform to implement its strategy for expanded coverage for foreign currency denominated lending and cater for the needs of customers living abroad.

Mr Joe Mensah, Chief Executive Officer of GHIB, said the bank had established itself as a preferred lender to Ghanaian institutions and other corporate organisations.

“The successful closure of transactions in the country demonstrates the bank’s commitment to its home market, Ghana and its desire to support various sectors of the Ghanaian economy” he said.

Ghanaweb
 

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Ghana Netherlands Business & Culture Council launched

The Ghana Netherlands Chamber of Commerce & Culture (GHANECC) has been transitioned into Ghana Netherlands Business & Culture Council (GNBCC).

GNBCC which was officially launched on Tuesday in Accra was as a result of a strong collaboration between the former GHANECC and the Netherlands African Business Council (NABC).

Addressing dignitaries from the Ghanaian and Dutch business communities, acting Ambassador of the Netherlands to Ghana, Caecilia Wijgers said “GHANECC and NABC are merging efforts, networks and activities into the GNBCC to represent business interests of both Ghanaian and Dutch companies while working closely together with the Embassy of the Kingdom of The Netherlands in Ghana.

In line with its objective, Madam Wijgers said GNBCC will support corporate entities to perform their operations seamlessly by making the requisite regulatory, financial and business-related information available to them.

“GNBCC takes completely Netherlands Embassy’s perspectives; we are about policy change from aid to trade and we believe that the private sector plays important role in sustainable environment here in Ghana in another manner, especially when economic times are hard.

“We are here to help the private sector businesses to develop and to do business at the same time. The Dutch are innovators and we like Public Private Partnership (PPP), this means that there will be many opportunities for both Ghanaian and Dutch businesses through the Dutch financial instruments”, she affirmed.

Commenting on Ghana’s recent deal with the International Monitory Fund (IMF), Ambassador Wijgers noted that she was particularly pleased with the deal hoping that it would help the medium term growth rebound as well stabilize the cedi over the major trading currencies.

On his part, President of GNBCC, Victor Rutgers, stressed that GNBCC would foster vibrant economic partnership that exist between the Netherlands and Ghana by facilitating and building upon business relationships to the benefit of both Ghana and the Netherlands.

Vice President of Ghana, Kwesi Amissah-Arthur who was the guest of honour in an address admitted that due to some pressures that occurred in 2012 there have been physical imbalances in the Ghanaian economy leading to the fast depreciation of the cedi.

Ghanaweb
 

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Ghana Home Loans signs MOU with govt to deliver affordable housing - See more at: http://business.citifmonline.com/2015/10/15/ghana-home-loans-signs-mou-with-govt-to-deliver-affordable-housing

Ghana Home Loans, the nation’s leading residential mortgage provider, has signed an MOU with the Department of Rural Housing (DRH), a policy formulation agency under the Ministry of Water Resources Works and Housing (MWRWH).

As the mortgage partner, Ghana Home Loans shall provide the prospective home owners with Home Construction Mortgages to finance their projects.

The credit facilities have repayments periods of up to 15 years.The use of locally sourced materials has the twin benefit of supporting local industry as well as delivering affordable housing to the target groups.

DRH offers a selection of spacious standard house designs ranging between 77 and 148 square metres.However the Department will consider large scale projects which require a different set of house designs.

The product offering is targeted at individuals, staff associations, and credit unions that have acquired land for their members and are considering options for construction.

The challenge that these groups have typically faced has been identifying housing solutions within their income range and agreeing on a contractor to build for them.

Ghana home loans
 
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