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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reuters reported that Ghana plans to restart its Valco aluminum smelter next year as a prelude to building an integrated aluminum industry as world metal prices and its own energy resources improve.

The 200,000 tonne per year smelter with six potlines has been shut since March 2007, largely due to weak metal prices and power shortages caused by low water levels in the vast Volta hydropower dam.

Mr Edward Bawa spokesman of Energy Ministry said that cabinet approved the restart of the smelter next year, initially on 2 potlines and ramping up later. Valco is presently negotiating with the 3 power utilities on power requirements and the relevant tariffs and we expect the company to restart immediately as soon as they have agreed on a price. The smelting process for aluminum is very power-intensive. It occurs in electrolytic cells or pots which are linked to form potlines.

Mr Bawa said that the Energy Ministry initiated the restart plans following an improvement in the country's power reserves. Presently, we are generating 2,085 megawatts of power against our peak period demand of 1,300 MW to 1,400 MW. An addition of 275.5 MW installed capacity last year greatly helped to buoy the supply system.

Aluminum traded at USD 2,262 per tonne in London at 1522 GMT. Prices of the metal which is used in used in transport and packaging, have risen from levels below USD 1,300 touched in early 2009 during the global economic crisis. Ghana fully owns Valco after buying Kaiser Aluminum's 90% stake in 2004 for USD 18 million and acquiring the outstanding 10% stake from US aluminum maker Alcoa 4 years later for USD 2 million with plans to establish an integrated industry including 2 million tonne per year alumina refinery.

Mr Bawa said that the cabinet also directed the Minister for Energy to develop a roadmap for the implementation of an integrated aluminum industry and liaise with the Minister for Finance to address fiscal issues. Ghana, the world's second largest cocoa producer and Africa's number two gold miner is targeting a double digit growth next year with commercial oil production due to start next month from the giant Jubilee field.

The government said that it would use gas from the Jubilee field to support the integrated aluminum industry which also consists of a bauxite mine, a 1,200 MW power station and upgrade the railway system between the capital Accra and major towns leading to the northern part of the country.

(Sourced from Reuters)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
there still must be problems with the distribution network because im sure they still have power outtages.

ghana looks like they have their shit together when it comes to power though. there are so many projects in the pipeline so the 5000MW by 2015 looks easily achievable. Though I dont see why Ghana would need that much by then.

Ghana should be making a mint from manufacturing now due to Nigerias problems but due to bribery on the roads to Nigeria, manufacturers say that the money they save on power being in Ghana is lost on the way. Really annoying that.
 

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there still must be problems with the distribution network because im sure they still have power outtages.

ghana looks like they have their shit together when it comes to power though. there are so many projects in the pipeline so the 5000MW by 2015 looks easily achievable. Though I dont see why Ghana would need that much by then.

Ghana should be making a mint from manufacturing now due to Nigerias problems but due to bribery on the roads to Nigeria, manufacturers say that the money they save on power being in Ghana is lost on the way. Really annoying that.
That's why I think regional unions are the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's why I think regional unions are the way to go.
there would still be briberies. they need to ban road check points completely because the police cant be trusted. And cameras should be installed at all major dorder crossings to ensure to bribery. The other thing they should do is send fake lorry drivers through as bait for corrupt officials.

The amount of bribes paid from a truckload of stuff from Tema to Burkina Faso, you would not believe it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
èđđeůx;67985019 said:
^^ is shipping it to Nigeria a too expensive alternative?
the ports in ghana and nigeria are clogged up, it takes ages for things to be cleared. you could drive from accra to lagos within a day, but im guessing shipping goods would take at least a couple of weeks.

its been a plus for Nigeria though, if this was not a problem im betting you would have seen many Nigerian factories moved to Ghana.
 

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the ports in ghana and nigeria are clogged up, it takes ages for things to be cleared. you could drive from accra to lagos within a day, but im guessing shipping goods would take at least a couple of weeks.

its been a plus for Nigeria though, if this was not a problem im betting you would have seen many Nigerian factories moved to Ghana.
don't let our dear brothers hear you. :lol:
 
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