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I don't think so. Who says 'let's go to x. We'll jump in the car and I'll definitely be able to park on sauchiehall street'. The sheer number of people on sauchiehall street, and the miniscule number that could possibly be parked, must make it a fairly insignificant contributory factor anyway.
 

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There's certainly evidence from America that (metered) on street parking tends both to significantly boost local businesses and improve pedestrian experience/numbers (since it acts as a barrier between the moving traffic). Obviously everything's contextual and glasgow isn't Kansas City or Charlotte....but I'd be cautious (and bear in mind who's saying this) about 'less cars!' as a catch-all solution....the pedestrianised sections of sauchiehall street are goddamn grim and things only improve as you come out of it to the sections where there is on street parking supporting things like music shops, furniture shops etc.
 

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It also becomes less grim as you leave all dying generic big stores behind and enter the area with a few smaller specialist stores, and all the pubs and restaurants. Yes, it's also the bit people can park at but I'm not convinced that that's the reason.
 

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I'd open up the whole street to traffic with minimal parking, Argyle Street too. The pedestrianised sections are dying slow deaths and are basically forced to be retail focused rather than diversifying.

They also block major East-West routes through the city centre, causing congestion on alternate routes.
 

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returning as many streets as possible to two way always seemed like a good idea to me....induces cars to go slower, makes it much easier and safer to cross. Just more pleasant. That in tandem with measures like Gordon street and merchant city which don't restrict access but which tame speeds and reduce through-put. Obviously turning all that into an actual, workable plan/road network might be pretty complicated
 

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returning as many streets as possible to two way always seemed like a good idea to me....induces cars to go slower, makes it much easier and safer to cross. Just more pleasant. That in tandem with measures like Gordon street and merchant city which don't restrict access but which tame speeds and reduce through-put. Obviously turning all that into an actual, workable plan/road network might be pretty complicated
Maybe it's my engineering background but I think it sounds disastrous to turn more streets 2-way.

Really difficult to cater for all the conflicting traffic movements at junctions.

This in turn makes 'walking with traffic' staging for pedestrians which we have impossible at the junctions without masses of islands, reducing the amount of green man time and making it less pedestrian friendly.

To be honest I'd say it makes roads less safe and harder to cross!
 

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Glasgow is great for this though. You can pedestrianize the flatter streets and open up the steeper streets to cars. If cars are for convenience then use them to make difficult areas accessible and convenient, pedestrians get the easy walking streets. Make Bath St two way, pedestrianize Sauchiehall St. The north/south streets from Renfield st west to Motorway make two way for cars, also most of the east west in that same area could be two way

I would really like to see part of St Vincent st pedestrian as well from George Square to Renfield street ( or at least West Nile St ) but the traffic flows across the city just dont work unless you make West George St two way. I like the idea of using Union St for bus and taxi only with islands to get on and off providing more edges for those things to happen, make more use of High Street/Clyde street for cars getting across the city if they dont want to use the motorway.
 

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Maybe it's my engineering background but I think it sounds disastrous to turn more streets 2-way.

Really difficult to cater for all the conflicting traffic movements at junctions.

This in turn makes 'walking with traffic' staging for pedestrians which we have impossible at the junctions without masses of islands, reducing the amount of green man time and making it less pedestrian friendly.

To be honest I'd say it makes roads less safe and harder to cross!
It'd make driving through town slower and less convenient for sure. But that's a good thing. Allot of American cities have reconfiged one way downtown grids to two way in the last 10-15 years and apparently the evidence has been that it's significantly reduced accidents and also increased retail turnover on the effected streets. although again, how relevant lessons from America are would be open to question
 

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Two-way streets are pretty bad for pedestrians. At the intersection of two one-way streets, pedestrians have far more frequent opportunities to cross the roads, because one flow of traffic is stopped for half the time and the other road's flow is stopped for the remaining time.

Make those same streets two-way, and you've got traffic from four different directions turning left, right and going straight on at each junction. That means you have to wait for all four roads to come to a standstill before you cross. It's essentially the difference between crossing a side street along Bath/West George/West Regent St (fairly quick and painless) or crossing Byres Road at University Avenue/Highburgh Road (takes absolutely ages).

On a tangential topic, there's some Freaky Friday-type stuff going on in this thread. Charlie's promoting parking on Sauchiehall Street, and I'm championing pedestrian access...
 

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It'd make driving through town slower and less convenient for sure. But that's a good thing. Allot of American cities have reconfiged one way downtown grids to two way in the last 10-15 years and apparently the evidence has been that it's significantly reduced accidents and also increased retail turnover on the effected streets. although again, how relevant lessons from America are would be open to question
I think we are a bit chalk and cheese to American transport policy to be honest!

I did a bit of reading as what you were saying interested me- I still don't think it is a good idea.

Our grid is compact and doesn't involve long diversions. Some of the science in the studies seems to be in the 'spurious' category (more congestion means people get to window shop) and too many unaccounted variables (as ever in transport engineering to be fair).

One aspect that was touted was that 2-way was better for shorter journeys- not sure many journeys into Glasgow's grid are only for 2-3 blocks nor would we want to encourage short hops by cars.

The other aspect is America generally expects turning drivers to give way to pedestrians. The UK system is no conflict with traffic and pedestrians have free reign to cross. That means their junctions naturally work better as they don't have 20-30 seconds where all traffic is stopped (at the expense of pedestrian connectivity as well everyone drives in USA right?)

I'd have concerns on pedestrian connectivity, congestion, public transport reliability and reduction in air quality in the City Centre if you did it. It would also be a reason not to introduce segregated cycleways as there would now not be 'enough space'.

I'd say the short section of 2-way on Jamaica Street for buses northbound probably best exhibits the issues- the junction has congestion and it's an accident blackspot. If they made Jamaica Street 1-way southbound I think all 3 things could improve.

I'd say the main difference between Byres rd and bath street is that Byres Rd/uni av gets way way way way more traffic. As a pedestrian I certainly wouldn't want it converted to one way
I think you'd be surprised. Byres Road probably isn't catering for a lot more traffic. You see more traffic as it is congested more often and this is due to the lack of capacity in junctions and traffic lights. There is probably suppressed demand too (traffic that is routing through minor roads because it is congested. Bath Street doesn't tend to have that.

I'm not sure crossing 2 way streets in the city is easier than 1 way. For example I happy cross the streets in Glasgow's grid during the red man, but crossing Byres Road is a nightmare!
 

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America cant have one model for traffic due to history , shape and size , i lived in one where you could park on a Friday and not touch your car again till Monday and worked in others where you needed a car for the shortest journey as there were no sidewalks.
I think you could make the case for East/West streets in Glasgow being two way and the main North/South streets ( Renfield/Union/Jamaic, Hope ) being one way. introduce a sensible local version of Californias "Right turn on red" to freely move traffic in the somewhat quieter streets bounded by Argyle/Bath/Hope/M8.

I often wonder if the reason we have so much traffic through town when there is a great honking motorway to bypass, or at least get you to your desired area/side of the city, is that people are stuck in routes learned years ago. If you bus gated Cathedral St at Stirling Road and said access to Buchanan Galleries Parking was A804/North Hanover St would that make a difference or change minds( that is the case now due to work but cars still go all the way down before realising)
 

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America cant have one model for traffic due to history , shape and size , i lived in one where you could park on a Friday and not touch your car again till Monday and worked in others where you needed a car for the shortest journey as there were no sidewalks.
I think you could make the case for East/West streets in Glasgow being two way and the main North/South streets ( Renfield/Union/Jamaic, Hope ) being one way. introduce a sensible local version of Californias "Right turn on red" to freely move traffic in the somewhat quieter streets bounded by Argyle/Bath/Hope/M8.

I often wonder if the reason we have so much traffic through town when there is a great honking motorway to bypass, or at least get you to your desired area/side of the city, is that people are stuck in routes learned years ago. If you bus gated Cathedral St at Stirling Road and said access to Buchanan Galleries Parking was A804/North Hanover St would that make a difference or change minds( that is the case now due to work but cars still go all the way down before realising)
Nah, the reason the streets of Glasgow are so busy is because the M8 is jammed so much of the day, that its quicker to drive through the centre of town than take the 'ring road' the M8 on a dark winters night at Junction 15 west bound is a total car park,

I think something needs to be done to improve it, closing a number of city centre junctions would help, but people need to face up to the fact that until public transport is free, or at the very least cheap and easy to use, most people are going to drive everywhere, its the preferred mode of transport for the majority, and Glasgow merrily sticking bus gates all over the city just stops them coming in, and sends them to Silverburn/Braehead/Fort
 
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