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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Go to Oklahoma, Young Man
by Wendell Cox 07/04/2009

One of the great migrations of Americans was from Dust Bowl Oklahoma to California during the Great Depression. People came from all over the parched plains to California; South Dakotans, Nebraskans, Oklahomans and others. But only one group had a name. No one called them Dakoties, nor Nebies, but they did call them “Okies.” Their legacy was spread by John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath. Indeed, so many came to California that it enacted an “anti-Okie” law, which was duly set aside by the United States Supreme Court (Edwards v. the People of California).

How things change. A Sacramento Bee article reports on the migration of Californians to, of all places Oklahoma and nearby states. For decades, Oklahoma has been the ultimate of “flyover country,” one of the last places people on the coast would think of moving to. Yet, as I pointed out in 2005, Oklahoma has become more competitive, at least partially because its advantages in housing costs and hassle free commuting. Moreover, it’s more than Californians. Seattle, which lost home-grown Boeing to Chicago some years ago, lost its NBA “Supersonics” to Oklahoma City last year. Having spent most of my life on the coast, I never would have imagined that Oklahoma City would become competitive with California and Seattle. But it has.
http://www.newgeography.com/content/00890-go-oklahoma-young-man
 

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Cant be that many people moving to Oklahoma, the estimated net domestic migration last year for the entire state was only 8,000 people (for comparison Metro Nashville had around 16,000). Maybe its more than the state is used to, but still abysmal.
 

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Here is the story from the Sacramento Bee that this snippet refers to:

http://www.sacbee.com/ourregion/story/1944947.html

Many of those leaving California for the mid-South have valuable skills, census figures show. They skew younger and highly educated, the kind of people upon which a state builds its future.
From 2004 through 2007, about 275,000 Californians left the Golden State for the old Dust Bowl states of Oklahoma and Texas, twice the number that left those two states for California, recent Internal Revenue Service figures show. In fact, the mid-South gained more residents from California during those four years than either Oregon, Nevada or Arizona. The trend continued into 2008.

As a result, it's easy to find Californians – even former Sacramentans – living and working in Oklahoma City, a capital of the American heartland.
I have met many people in the last few months who have come here from California- it's a pretty elegant turn of historic events, really- 1930s Oklahoma/Texas had a crushing economic meltdown and a natural disaster that lasted years, forcing people westward, and now California has an economic meltdown that forces people back.
 

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I dunno...I thought the Sonics just moved to OKC because they had a shiny new arena that Seattle didn't care to provide for them because for the most part, people in Seattle just didn't care all that much about the NBA. I don't think it has to do with population at all. For one, people in Seattle have a much bigger city with a major league football and baseball team. OKC had no major league teams at all. Of the 3, the NBA seems to me to be the least popular sport. So, little fish in a big pond (NBA in Seattle) or a big fish in a little pond (NBA in OKC). They would probably make more money being in OKC with a brand new arena and being the only major league team in the city. Just my opinion.

Chicago and Seattle - there is competition there, but OKC and Seattle are not on the same level. And I certainly don't mean to bash OKC when saying this. I say this with the perspective of being a resident of a smaller city also. My town, Charlotte, isn't on the same level as Seattle either. But you know what? I love Charlotte anyway. That's why I'm here. I was in Seattle earlier this week, and it seemed to be booming - if I was a Seattle resident, I certainly wouldn't worry about OKC (or Charlotte or any other similarly-sized city) stealing it's thunder anytime soon.

OK, I really didn't mean that as a pun. Seriously. I just realized it after I typed it. I accidentally made a joke. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Seattle didn't want to build a new arena because they did so in 1995 to the exact specifics of the NBA and the Sonics and in doing so built an arena intentionally too small for an NHL team. The team then realized that with the current economic structure of the NBA that they wouldn't be able to make money unless Seattle built a 300 to 500 million dollar arena barely a decade after building them an arena.

This wasn't meant to be about OKC trying to be like Seattle. Just that OKC is making huge strides toward becoming a nationally known city.
 

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Yeah. I live in OKC. I really don't hear much about Enid as a player in this state. Actually, I hear nothing about that town. I know I wouldn't be caught dead anywhere in this state besides Oklahoma City and maybe Tulsa.
 

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Yeah. I live in OKC. I really don't hear much about Enid as a player in this state. Actually, I hear nothing about that town. I know I wouldn't be caught dead anywhere in this state besides Oklahoma City and maybe Tulsa.
I was recently at an urban conference and the speaker mentioned Enid as a city that would see massive growth in the 21st Century, fueled by its proximity to energy resources. He said the city would eventually gain international prominence.

I'm surprised there isn't more talk about Enid---particularly among those who live closest to this emerging metropolis.
 

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Quote:
From 2004 through 2007, about 275,000 Californians left the Golden State for the old Dust Bowl states of Oklahoma and Texas


That's actually really funny, because of the 275,000 probably about 250,000 came to Texas.
 

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Quote:
From 2004 through 2007, about 275,000 Californians left the Golden State for the old Dust Bowl states of Oklahoma and Texas


That's actually really funny, because of the 275,000 probably about 250,000 came to Texas.
Yes that's about right- I was surprised they chose to write about okc instead of texas. Possibly because its a sacramento story and maybe more sacramentans move to Oklahoma and Texas gets the refugees from socal.
 

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Cant be that many people moving to Oklahoma, the estimated net domestic migration last year for the entire state was only 8,000 people (for comparison Metro Nashville had around 16,000). Maybe its more than the state is used to, but still abysmal.
You couldn't resist could ya, douche?
 

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My wife from Enid is a nice town. Not really much to do (except watch the Oklahoma Storm), but it is quiet and the traffic is easy to get around in.
 

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I think Tulsa is probably a more popular place for outta state relocations than OKC is. That's just a rough guess though, because I haven't seen any statistics on that. I can say firmly though that OKC is obviously going to see an increase, so it shouldn't be notable when that happens..afterall ramping up migration is the entire premise of all of the MAPS programs.

@ Cashville (although I don't know why I bother): As for Oklahoma's net migration being abysmal, I think it's typical of Cashville to compare an entire state (where rural counties are loosing population) to a single metropolitan area. Obviously OKC's migration won't be as high as Nashville's because OKC is only growing 50-66% as fast as Nashville at the moment, but clearly one would have to expect that including the rest of the state with OKC + Tulsa is going to bring down the NET migration total. That's like including Detroit with Ann Arbor for the purpose of bringing down Ann Arbor's statistics.. give me a break.

I was recently at an urban conference and the speaker mentioned Enid as a city that would see massive growth in the 21st Century, fueled by its proximity to energy resources. He said the city would eventually gain international prominence.

I'm surprised there isn't more talk about Enid---particularly among those who live closest to this emerging metropolis.
I used to go up to Enid occasionally. I don't know if you're being serious though. It's that kind of town. There are small towns in Oklahoma that I would say have a brighter future..while the problem with Enid is its sheer isolation. It's up in the deserted Great Plains part of the state where there is a small hill about every 5 miles and a tree about every 2 miles. The town of Enid is very surprising, especially for how downtrodden the western part of the state is, but for what a nice little town it actually is, it just doesn't have the same potential as other towns like Bartlesville, Ardmore, Lawton, and others.
 

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Yes that's about right- I was surprised they chose to write about okc instead of texas. Possibly because its a sacramento story and maybe more sacramentans move to Oklahoma and Texas gets the refugees from socal.
No, its because they wanted to play off of the dustbowl and use the word okie in a story.
 

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I just like the name! Enid Enid Enid :)
you should considering it's in garfield county. i like the name garfield, so it works out well. the only cat i've ever liked.



enid is actually a really cool town tho believe it or not. 412 heading into town is ridiculous though, this huge highway in the middle of nowhere and no one but you on it. if you're in a car full of friends it's fun to freak out when there's a bridge, a tree, or a slight 2° curve. there aren't any small hills so there's no need to really freak out.

as for oklahoma city, luckily it's not enid. okc is a surprisingly attractive and urban major city that has really come a long ways since the 1990s. there's no comparison for what okc is like today and what it used to be like before.
 

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Enid does have a very large broad skyline that is very big!!!!!! if you like oil refineries and grain silo's!!!!I go to Enid twice a month on a route,for a city all out on it's own with no large metro around it, its pretty big for what it is,plus having Vance air force base there helps alot!
 
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