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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we have a thread on the 'National Graphene Institute', I just think it is important to have its own thread on the invention, and commercialisation of this miracle invention. I will start the thread with what I have put on the National Graphene Institute thread.

This is a publication of the worlds patents.
Section 3 is on the UK perspective:

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/informatics-graphene-2013.pdf
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
£60m boost to city's graphene hub
10 September 2014 05:51 AM By Jennifer Williams

Chancellor George Osborne will welcome the latest phase in a masterplan to create a 'northern powerhouse' fuelled by high-tech scientific research.

Graphene has the potential to revolutionise computers and electronic gadgets.
Manchester's second world-class graphene hub has got the go-ahead, the Chancellor will announce today – in a mammoth £60m boost to the city.

George Osborne will unveil plans for the cutting-edge centre in a visit to Manchester university, birthplace of the so-called 'wonder material'.

He will welcome it as the latest phase in a masterplan to create a 'northern powerhouse' fuelled by high-tech scientific research.

Continued on link

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co...d=83704&icid=eml_MENBusiness_BusinessReadMore
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
From the Businessdesk

Abu Dhabi to invest in second graphene centre
10th September 2014

CHANCELLOR George Osborne is to announce a further £60m investment in Manchester's nascent graphene research industry today.

A second graphene institute called the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre will be funded by £15m from the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund, £5m from Innovate UK, formerly the Technology Strategy Board, and £30m from Abu Dhabi clean technology and renewable energy group Masdar.

The remaining £10m will be sourced by the university.

Continued on link

http://www.thebusinessdesk.com/mobi...mpaign=NorthWest_10th_Sep_2014_-_Daily_E-mail
 

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Very exciting news - a bit more elaboration from the UoM -

New £60m Engineering Innovation Centre to be based in Manchester
10 Sep 2014

Funding provided by the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund, the Technology Strategy Board and Masdar, an Abu Dhabi-based clean technology and renewable energy company University of Manchester and Masdar Institute to establish graphene commercial application programmes

The University of Manchester is to build a £60m Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC). The facility will be critical in the development of commercial applications and in maintaining the UK’s world-leading position in graphene and related 2-D materials.

The GEIC will be partially funded by £15m from the Higher Education Funding Council for England’s UK Research Partnership Investment Fund (UKRPIF), £5m from the Technology Strategy Board and by £30m from Masdar, the Abu Dhabi-based renewable energy company owned by Mubadala which focuses on advancing the development, commercialisation and deployment of clean technologies and solutions. Additional funding for the Centre and its programmes will be provided by other research funds and institutions. The Centre will allow for the acceleration of applied research and development in partnership with other research organisations and industry.

In addition, The University of Manchester and Masdar Institute, the research-intensive university that is a key pillar of the Masdar Initiative, have commenced identifying joint graphene application research and fellowship programmes, which will focus on industrial applications for graphene across a range of sectors.

The GEIC will complement Manchester’s existing National Graphene Institute (NGI), where over 200 scientists and engineers are dedicated to graphene and 2-D materials research. Together, the two facilities will reinforce Manchester’s position as a globally leading knowledge base in graphene research and commercialisation.

Vice-President and Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Professor Colin Bailey, said: “Research and development in graphene and 2-D material applications will transform the world. The world-leading knowledge base is here in Manchester and to harvest this knowledge, for the benefit of the economy and society more widely, urgent infrastructure facilities are required. The GEIC, supported by part funding from the UKRPIF, TSB and Masdar, is essential to maintain the UK’s international leadership position in this area and ensure effective commercialisation of a UK discovery.”

The Chief Executive Officer of Masdar, Dr. Ahmad Belhoul, said: "Developing and implementing new sustainable technologies is at the heart of Masdar’s mission. Our existing research partnerships have a history of producing innovative solutions across a range of sectors. Masdar is pleased to be partnering with The University of Manchester, which has world leading academic and research credentials. With potential applications for graphene across major industries, we are confident that together we can pioneer the use of this ground breaking material."

The GEIC will fill a critical gap in the ecosystem for graphene and 2-D material research, development, and application in the UK. It will offer the UK the unique opportunity to establish a leading role in a disruptive technology that spans a number of industrial sectors. Linking into existing national expertise, the GEIC will focus on pilot production and characterisation, together with application development in composites, energy, solution formulations and coatings, electronics, and membranes.

The GEIC facility will also stimulate the commercial redevelopment of the University’s North Campus, creating a cornerstone for ‘graphene city’ and a wider advanced materials campus. The campus is located just yards from HS2 at Piccadilly Station and the proposed HS3 link across the north, recently announced by the Chancellor.

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=12777
Could be very exiting from an architectural point of view too with Masdar being the creators of the on going Norman Foster designed Masdar-City project in Abu Dhabi -



http://inhabitat.com/photos-hundred...eco-street-fair/masdar-city-tafline-laylin-2/

SSC construction thread -

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=585191&page=14
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
From the Businessdesk

Graphene firm may open light factory in Manchester
12th November 2014

A TECHNOLOGY business is said to be considering opening a factory in Manchester producing LED lights which use graphene to make them more effective.

Speaking at a manufacturing event in the city last night, James Baker, business director at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) said the unnamed company was "close to opening a factory here in Manchester".

Graphene is the super-light, super-strong material discovered by Manchester’s Nobel prize winning scientists Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

Continued on link

http://www.thebusinessdesk.com/mobi...mpaign=NorthWest_12th_Nov_2014_-_Daily_E-mail
 

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Business Desk North West.

2-DTech to work closely with graphene institute

21st November 2014

By James Graham - Deputy Editor, North West

Manchester's National Graphene Institute

VERSARIAN, the company that owns nascent graphene commercialisation business 2-DTech is set to work more closely with Manchester University's National Graphene Institute.

The two have signed a memorandum of understanding which will enable 2-DTech to work from the £61m institute when it opens in March and draw on graphene know-how at the university.

The company is one of the first in the world to produce graphene, the super-light, super-strong material discovered by Manchester’s Nobel prize winning scientists Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

It is expected to have wide ranging implications for industry and has been linked to a new generation of aircraft and big changes to computer, TV and phone screens.

2-DTech, originally a university spin-out, was acquired for £440,000 in May by materials manufacturing business Versarien, which has a base in Liverpool. The university still holds a 15% stake.

It is also exploring the potential for graphene use in false teeth, inks, sensors and batteries. It also has a solar cell project with Australian firm Dyesol which has a research base in Manchester.

Managing director Dr Nigel Salter said: "2-DTech is delighted that we will now be able to respond to customer enquiries and project requests utilising the combined expertise of both 2-DTech and the NGI as well as apply the commercial expertise and funding opportunities that Versarien represents."

James Baker, business director of grapheme at the university said: "We look forward to working with 2-DTech on a number of graphene related projects in the newly completed National Graphene Institute and in developing and growing the relationship into a strategic partnership in the near future. We expect to see a number of exciting opportunities for graphene applications and products and this relationship will help in the acceleration of graphene commercialisation."
 

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Business Desk North West.


Graphene firm working on hi-tech false teeth

20th November 2014

By James Graham - Deputy Editor, North West

Manchester's National Graphene Institute

PIONEERING graphene firm 2-DTech has revealed more detail of its project to develop false teeth using the new material.

Earlier this month the company secured £80,000 from InnovateUK, formerly known as the Technology Strategy Board, to create graphene reinforced polymers for dental implants with Liverpool firm Evodental.

The company is one of the first in the world to produce graphene, the super-light, super-strong material discovered by Manchester’s Nobel prize winning scientists Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

It is expected to have wide ranging implications for industry and has been linked to a new generation of aircraft and big changes to computer, TV and phone screens.

Yesterday, managing director Dr Nigel Salter told TheBusinessDesk.com the plan was to modify the peek polymer, manufactured by Thornton Cleveleys-based Victrex, to make it stronger and better match the bone it is attached to in the dental implant process.

He said: "The graphene will enable them to make the peek frame thinner and alleviate the pain that can be felt from a hot drink by matching the thermal expansion."

2-DTech is not yet working directly with Victrex but will approach the group if there is potential to scale up the innovation. At present the company is only producing small amounts of the material which is relatively cheap to make and sells for about £100 a litre. There are four recognised methods of production and 2-DTech has licences to use three of them - chemical exfoliation, shearing and chemical bath deposition. All involve taking a very thin layer of graphite.

"If you find an application like graphene in peek, and it makes sense and there's demand, there would be a lot more emphasis on ramping up production," said Dr Salter. "The issue is generating the demand and supply at the same rate."

He added: "Potential customers say, 'We're excited but we don't know how to use it. We're looking for materials that are well understood and the way to apply them is well known'. There's a real buzz and enthusiasm to use graphene and get it out there, it's just a question of how."

2-DTech, originally a university spin-out, was acquired for £440,000 in May by materials manufacturing business Versarien, which has a base in Liverpool. The university still holds a 15% stake.

It is also exploring the potential for graphene use in inks, sensors and batteries. It also has a solar cell project with Australian firm Dyesol which has a research base in Manchester.
 

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From the Businessdesk

Graphene firm may open light factory in Manchester
12th November 2014

A TECHNOLOGY business is said to be considering opening a factory in Manchester producing LED lights which use graphene to make them more effective.

Speaking at a manufacturing event in the city last night, James Baker, business director at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) said the unnamed company was "close to opening a factory here in Manchester".

Graphene is the super-light, super-strong material discovered by Manchester’s Nobel prize winning scientists Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

Continued on link

http://www.thebusinessdesk.com/mobi...mpaign=NorthWest_12th_Nov_2014_-_Daily_E-mail
Business Desk North West.

Graphene firm may open light factory in Manchester

12th November 2014

By James Graham - Deputy Editor, North West

A TECHNOLOGY business is said to be considering opening a factory in Manchester producing LED lights which use graphene to make them more effective.

Speaking at a manufacturing event in the city last night, James Baker, business director at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) said the unnamed company was "close to opening a factory here in Manchester".

Graphene is the super-light, super-strong material discovered by Manchester University’s Nobel prize winning scientists Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

It also conducts heat which is why there is interest in using it in LED lighting which can become very hot. The graphene would be used to dissipate the heat.

The NGI, which will formally open in a £60m purpose-built centre at Manchester University in March, brings together graphene research and industry.

It is already working with Bluestone Global Tech, which has laboratories in New York and Taiwan, and 2-DTech on various applications. 2-DTech is working on a project to create graphene reinforced polymers for dental implants with Liverpool firm Evodental, and is exploring the potential for graphene use in solar cells with Australian firm Dyesol.

Mr Baker said the LED project "maybe" involved Bluestone, and another company. "They will do the research at the NGI and may build the factory in Manchester," he said. He was speaking while on a panel discussing the challenges for exporters at an event at the Etihad Stadium last night sponsored by accountancy group PwC, law firm DLA Piper and the Royal Bank of Scotland.

The panel also featured: Brian Holliday, divisional director at Siemens; David Miller, chief financial officer of JCB maker Bamford Excavators; and Clive Drinkwater, director of UK Trade & Investment (North West).

Neill Briggs, technical director of Liverpool-based Briggs Automotive Company (BAC) which makes the Mono sports car, was due to attend but was promoting the car at events around the Brazilian Grand Prix.


Mr Miller said he had four rules for successful exporting: Have the right product; understand the market; have a pricing model that withstands currency fluctuations; and make sure you get paid.
 

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Business Desk North West.

GRAPHENE scientists believe the material could revolutionise green energy and electric cars by radically improving fuel cell technology.

Researchers have discovered that graphene allows positively charged hydrogen atoms or protons to pass through it despite being completely impermeable to all other gases.

The team, led by the Nobel prize winner and discoverer of graphene Sir Andre Geim of Manchester University, said the finding also raised the possibility that, in future, graphene membranes could be used to "sieve" hydrogen gas from the atmosphere to then generate electricity.

Geim's co-researcher on the study, Marcelo Lozada-Hidalgo, said: "We are very excited about this result because it opens a whole new area of promising applications for graphene in clean energy harvesting and hydrogen-based technologies."

Graphene, the thinnest material on earth at just one atom thick, and 200 times stronger than steel, was first isolated in 2004 by Sir Andrew and Sir Kostya Novoselov, who were awarded a Nobel Prize in 2010 for their work. It is renowned for being impermeable to all gases and liquids, giving it the potential for a range of uses such as corrosion-proof coatings.

Against expectations, the latest research, published in Nature, found the protons could pass through the ultra-strong material fairly easily, especially at raised temperatures and if the graphene films were covered with nanoparticles such as platinum, which acted as a catalyst.

Fuel cells, used in some modern cars, use oxygen and hydrogen as fuel and convert the input chemical energy into electricity. But a major problem is that the fuels leak across the existing proton membranes, "poisoning" the process and reducing the cells' efficiency, something Geim said could be overcome using graphene.

The team also found that graphene membranes could be used to extract hydrogen from the atmosphere, suggesting the possibility of combining them with fuel cells to make mobile electric generators powered just by the tiny amounts of hydrogen in the air.

"Essentially, you pump your fuel from the atmosphere and get electricity out of it," said Sir Andre. "Our (study) provides proof that this kind of device is possible."

The £61m National Graphene Institute, which will be dedicated to research into the material, is due to open at Manchester University in March.
 

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After watching the first video, which is very good, click on the 2nd video, which features Graphene and Energy.

University announces new graphene partners

05 Dec 2014

Two more companies have finalised collaborative partnerships with The University of Manchester to work on graphene applications of the future.


James Baker showing the industry group around the NGI

Morgan Advanced Materials and 2D-Tech have both agreed long-term research collaborations with the National Graphene Institute (NGI), the £61m centre at the University set to open in early 2015.
The news coincided with the first industry tour of the NGI this week, when representatives from 15 companies including AkzoNobel, Tata and BAE Systems were the first to tour the NGI just months before it opens its doors.

The industry group also formed the Advisory Panel for the £60m Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), which will fill a critical gap in the ecosystem for graphene and 2-D material research, development, and application in the UK.

Also revealed today for the first time is the first of three graphene-related videos from The University of Manchester, showing how our research in partnership with industry could create real-life applications

The partnership with Morgan Advanced Materials will explore the full potential of graphene, with a particular interest in understanding and optimising the relationship between the manufacturing process and materials science. The partnership has been established to improve the prospects of bringing this material to commercial reality.

2D-Tech, which was a company spun-out of The University of Manchester in 2013, was taken over by Versarien earlier this year. The collaboration will initially focus on projects in graphene/polymer nanocomposites and 2D inks but will look develop further project opportunities and to grow into a strategic partnership.

The two firms join more than 30 partners currently working on graphene research and commercialisation projects with the University.

Neill Ricketts, CEO of Versarien plc, said: “This is a significant step forward for 2-DTech and its journey towards commercialisation and we are delighted to cement our relationship with The University of Manchester.”

The industry representatives who took part in the first tour of the NGI were shown how commercial organisations and academics will work side by side on the applications of the future.

One of the visitors, Steve Harris, Head of University Collaboration for BAE Systems, said: “I was very impressed by the scale and the vision of what Manchester is trying to achieve. The key for companies like BAE Systems, who will be long-term users of graphene, is the capability to move quickly and the GEIC will allow the University to do that.

“The sheer scale of what I have seen today is fantastic and it’s very clear to see the University’s ambition.”

James Baker, Business Director of [email protected], said: “We now have more than 200 researchers at The University of Manchester working on graphene and 2D materials and with the opening of the NGI in early 2015, we are seeing an increasing engagement with industry and new partners being signed.

“This engagement with industry on research projects and in shaping the future capabilities of the GEIC for pilot production of graphene and its various applications will be key to the increased probability of success in the commercialisation of the material.”

The NGI is funded by £38m from the UK Government, via the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and £23m from the European Regional Development Fund. The GEIC is funded by £15m from the Higher Education Funding Council for England’s UK Research Partnership Investment Fund (UKRPIF), £5m from Innovate UK and by £30m from Masdar, the Abu Dhabi-based renewable energy company owned by Mubadala.

Notes for editors

James Baker is available for interview on request.

Images and more information about graphene can be found at www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk

Graphene: Membranes

The Home of Graphene


 

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Manchester University News.

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy

25 Feb 2015

University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells.



Graphene oxide flakes interacting with cell membranes: K. Novoselov

This new development opens up the possibility of preventing or treating a broad range of cancers, using a non-toxic material.

Writing in the journal Oncotarget, the team of researchers led by Professor Michael Lisanti and Dr Aravind Vijayaraghavan has shown that graphene oxide, a modified form of graphene, acts as an anti-cancer agent that selectively targets cancer stem cells (CSCs).

In combination with existing treatments, this could eventually lead to tumour shrinkage as well as preventing the spread of cancer and its recurrence after treatment. However, more pre-clinical studies and extensive clinical trials will be necessary to move this forward into the clinic to ensure patient benefit.

Professor Lisanti, the Director of the Manchester Centre for Cellular Metabolism within the University’s Institute of Cancer Sciences, explained: “Cancer stem cells possess the ability to give rise to many different tumour cell types. They are responsible for the spread of cancer within the body - known as metastasis- which is responsible for 90% of cancer deaths.

“They also play a crucial role in the recurrence of tumours after treatment. This is because conventional radiation and chemotherapies only kill the ‘bulk’ cancer cells, but do not generally affect the CSCs.”

Dr Vijayaraghavan added: “Graphene oxide is stable in water and has shown potential in biomedical applications. It can readily enter or attach to the surface of cells, making it a candidate for targeted drug delivery. In this work, surprisingly, it’s the graphene oxide itself that has been shown to be an effective anti-cancer drug.

“Cancer stem cells differentiate to form a small mass of cells known as a tumour-sphere. We saw that the graphene oxide flakes prevented CSCs from forming these, and instead forced them to differentiate into non-cancer stem-cells.

“Naturally, any new discovery such as this needs to undergo extensive study and trials before emerging as a therapeutic. We hope that these exciting results in laboratory cell cultures can translate into an equally effective real-life option for cancer therapy.”

The team prepared a variety of graphene oxide formulations for testing against six different cancer types - breast, pancreatic, lung, brain, ovarian and prostate. The flakes inhibited the formation of tumour sphere formation in all six types, suggesting that graphene oxide can be effective across all, or at least a large number of different cancers, by blocking processes which take place at the surface of the cells. The researchers suggest that, used in combination with conventional cancer treatments, this may deliver a better overall clinical outcome.

Dr Federica Sotgia, one of the co-authors of the study, concluded: “These findings show that graphene oxide could possibly be applied as a lavage or rinse during surgery to clear CSCs or as a drug targeted at CSCs.

“Our results also show that graphene oxide is not toxic to healthy cells, which suggests that this treatment is likely to have fewer side-effects if used as an anti-cancer therapy.”

Graphene has the potential to revolutionise a vast number of applications, lighter, stronger composites to flexible, bendable electronics. Graphene oxide can be used to create membranes that can coat surfaces to prevent corrosion, or filter clean water in real time. Demonstrating the remarkable properties of graphene won a University team of researchers the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2010.

Cancer and materials advanced materials are among The University of Manchester’s research beacons - examples of pioneering discoveries, interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-sector partnerships that are tackling some of the biggest questions facing the planet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
From the BBC

Graphene lightbulb set for shops

A light bulb made with graphene - said by its UK developers to be the first commercially viable consumer product using the super-strong carbon - is to go on sale later this year.

The dimmable bulb contains a filament-shaped LED coated in graphene. It was designed at Manchester University, where the material was discovered.

It is said to cut energy use by 10% and last longer owing to its conductivity.
The National Graphene Institute at the university was opened this month.

The light bulb was developed by a Canadian-financed company called Graphene Lighting - one of whose directors is Prof Colin Bailey, deputy vice-chancellor at the University of Manchester.

It is expected to be priced lower than some LED bulbs, which can cost about £15 each.
Based on traditional light bulb design, the use of graphene allows it to conduct electricity and heat more effectively.

Prof Bailey told the BBC: "The graphene light bulb will use less energy. We expect it to last longer. The manufacturing costs are lower and it uses more and more sustainable components."
Planes and cars

The discovery of graphene in 2004 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, two Russian-born scientists at the University of Manchester, earned the pair the Nobel Prize for Physics and knighthoods.

A micro-thin layer of graphene is stronger than steel and it has been dubbed a "wonder material" because of its potential uses.

The government has invested £38m in the National Graphene Institute via the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, with an additional £23m provided by the European Regional Development Fund.

Chancellor George Osborne, who opened the site on 20 March, has said he hopes the UK can see off competition from China and South Korea to become a centre of excellence in graphene technology.

More than 35 companies worldwide have already partnered with the university to develop projects.
The race is now on to develop other practical and commercial uses, including lighter but more robust car and aircraft frames and false teeth. The material has already been incorporated into products including tennis rackets and skis

Graphene light bulb set for shops
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-32100071
 

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MEN.

Another bright idea! New lightbulb to be made out of Manchester wonder substance graphene

17:06, 30 March 2015
By Charlotte Cox

The lightbulb will use less energy, last longer and cost less than standard LEDs



The new wonder lightbulb is about to hit the shelves

A new wonder lightbulb made with graphene is about to hit the shelves - thanks to the wonder substance discovered by scientists at the University of Manchester.

It uses less energy, lasts longer and costs less to make than standard LEDs.

The invention comes from the £61m National Graphene Institute, which was opened last week at the university by the Chancellor George Osborne.

The university has a stake in UK-registered Graphene Lighting Plc, launched to bring the product to the market place.

It places Manchester in a strong position as it competes in the global race to get graphene to consumers - competing with the likes of Singapore, Korea and China.

A coating of one-atom-thick graphene on the bulb means heat is transferred away faster so it remains cooler, using less engergy.

Prof Colin Bailey, deputy president and deputy vice-chancellor of the university, is also a co-director of the firm.

He has told the M.E.N of plans to float it on the Canadian stock market.

He said: “This lightbulb shows that graphene products are becoming a reality, just a little more than a decade after it was first isolated – a very short time in scientific terms.

“This is just the start. Our partners are looking at a range of exciting applications, all of which started right here in Manchester.

"It is very exciting that the NGI has launched its first product despite barely opening its doors yet. The investment in facilities has been vital.”

Other examples of applications, he said, were coatings for products like bricks so as to stop water saturation electronics, anti-corrosives and batteries and chargers.

Manchester University campus and the newly built The National Graphene Institute

Prof Bailey added: “Before the institute we didn’t have the facilities to make these, the investment in facilities has been crucial.”

Graphene was isolated at The University of Manchester in 2004 by Sir Andre Geim and Sir Kostya Novoselov, earning them the Nobel prize for Physics in 2010.

The university is now home to 200 researchers and an unrivalled array of graphene and 2D material research projects.

The NGI will allow academic and commercial partners to work side by side on graphene applications of the future.

It is funded by £38m from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and £23m from the European Regional Development Fund.

There are currently more than 35 companies partnering with the NGI - and bosses are in talks with hundreds more.

In 2017, the university will open the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre, again aimed at fast-tracking products to market.

James Baker, fraphene business director, added: “The graphene lightbulb is proof of how partnering with the NGI can deliver real-life products which could be used by millions of people.

“This shows how The University of Manchester is leading the way not only in world-class graphene research but in commercialisation as well.
 

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How many scientist's does it take to change a light bulb?
200 apparently (and you need £61 million).
 
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