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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Great American Buildings
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The American Brewery ~ Humanin Bldg Baltimore

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The American Brewery is an historic former brewery located at 1700 North Gay Street in Baltimore, Maryland, United States.

Built in 1887 by John Frederick Wiessner, a German immigrant, the American Brewery in East Baltimore was one of the largest breweries in the state of Maryland. At its peak, the brewery employed 61 workers; 16 in brewery work, 17 drivers, 14 bottling house, 8 garage men, and 6 office workers. The central tower of the building housed a 10,000 bushel grain elevator. Prohibition forced the shut down of the facility in 1920. The Weissner family sold the brewery to the American Malt Company in 1931, who modernized the interior equipment and operated the brewery until 1973. The building was listed that year in the National Registry of Historic Sites.

In recent news the Brewery has become the new home for Humanim, a Columbia Md non-profit, has recently secured $22.5 million for renovations of the American Brewery Complex into their new headquarters. The City of Baltimore approved the building permit in early 2004 and work is now complete. The American Brewery is situated in the center of one of East Baltimore’s most blighted neighborhoods The building looks better than ever and Humanim encourages people to come visit and see this beautiful building.
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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The Guaranty Building ~ Buffalo NY



The Guaranty Building, which is now called the Prudential Building, was designed by Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler, and built in Buffalo, New York. It was built in 1896.

Sullivan's design for the building was based on his belief that "form follows function". He and Adler divided the building into four zones.

The supporting steel structure of the building was embellished with terra cotta blocks. Different styles of block delineated the three visible zones of the building. Sullivan was quoted as saying, "It must be every inch a proud and soaring thing, rising in sheer exultation that from bottom to top it is a unit without a single dissenting line."





 

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I'll throw in one of Milwaukee's contributions to great American buildings. This one isn't as well know as others, but it's one of my favorites:





"The former Chamber of Commerce Building, now called the Mackie Building, lies directly east of the Mitchell Building. It was built to accommodate the grain exchange (a commodity trading room) and the offices of the Chamber of Commerce. It compliments the Mitchell Building in scale, mass, materials and architectural grandeur. The five-story edifice is constructed of granite, limestone and trimmed with sandstone. The facades are richly carved and incised in the rectilinear High Italianate commercial style. The fifth floor is enclosed with a low pitch mansard roof with dormers. From the center of the Michigan Street façade rises a soaring clock tower topped by a cupola. Edward Townsend Mix was also commissioned to design this building for Alexander Mitchell, who built this as an investment property and leased it to the Chamber of Commerce.
The exterior of the building has remained largely intact with few alterations. The interior contains the sumptuous, three-story, grain exchange trading room that contained a sunken, tiered trading pit modeled after the one in the previous Chamber of Commerce Building. This original pit was presumed to have been the first one ever constructed. The trading room remained intact until after World War II when it was subdivided for office use. From 1981 to 1983 an intensive restoration of the trading room was undertaken by the owners to recreate one of the Midwest's most magnificent historic interiors. The ceiling and walls were originally adorned with frescoes, murals and wall paintings commissioned by local artists. Built for grain trading purposes, this early stock exchange room is divided into three sections by a series of colossal fauxmarble columns with gilded Corinthian-like capitals incorporating steamship and locomotive motifs. The themes of industry, agriculture, transportation, trade and commerce were repeated throughout the room's décor. At the center of the ceiling is a skylight surrounded by frescoes of wheat sheave medallions encircled by Wisconsin wild flowers. These were done by the Chicago fresco artist "Armini" who did the remaining ceiling treatments including the allegorical four seasons paintings at the corners and depictions of the Milwaukee Water Works, the Bay View Rollings Mills and the Wisconsin State Seal at the east and west ends of the room. The Canvas mural above the room's entrance was commissioned from local artist, John S. Conway. It depicts an allegorical scene of industry, agriculture and commerce with mythological figures harvesting grain, forging iron and gathered around a stock-ticker. The mural is the largest single piece of artwork in the room measuring 24 feet long by 10 feet wide. Below this, flanking the main entrance are two large wall paintings. The one to the east of the door depicts shipping and the one to the west depicts agriculture.

When grain trading ceased at this site in 1935, the room was little used. After World War II, the room was extensively altered when the lower part was subdivided into offices. The two-story space above the false ceilings that were erected was allowed to severely deteriorate. The room was accurately restored in 1982-83 and all of the missing architectural features were reproduced except for the long-vanished trading pit. The Conrad Schmitt Studios of New Berlin, Wisconsin recreated the new ceiling frescoes. Because the tie wires of the suspended ceiling had caused irreparable damage to them, photographs were taken, tracings made and over 140 colors recorded. The ceilings were replastered and spray-painted with a base coat and the tracings repainted in the original colors. The original wall paintings flanking the main entrance were unsalvageable and Sheboygan artist, Father Richard Fale, was commissioned to copy them. He also reproduced a third painting of a group of American Indians camped at the edge of a cornfield. The only original artwork to survive intact was Conway's mural. It required only cleaning and touch-up painting.
With the recreation of missing plasterwork, woodwork, faux-marbling and other features, the Grain Exchange Room has been restored to nearly its original appearance as ascertained from period photographs. It is one of the outstanding mural-ornamented Victorian commercial interiors in America
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM5EAB_Mackie_Building_Milwaukee_WI
 

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Monument Circle Indianapolis
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Discussion Starter #5
The Mackie Bldg. Is way cool! I've never seen it before. It looks like it was built in the 1870s, am I right? Monument Circle is one of the great urban spaces in the US. It's amazing how huge that monument really is!
 

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Goes great with our war memorial! :D



National Cathedral, DC
 

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The National Cathedral looks very similar to Detroit's Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament. I wonder if it was the inspiration or if there is a European cathedral that is the "original".


© Patricia Drury
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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The Bourse Philadelphia



The Bourse, at 111 South Independence Mall East, was built from 1893-95 by the Hewitt Brothers. Brought to Philadelphia in 1890 by George E. Bartol, a prosperous Philadelphia grain and commodities exporter, the Bourse literally means a place of exchange. It was in the country's first commodities exchange, and the first in the world to house simultaneously a stock exchange, maritime exchange, and grain-trading center.

Bartol based the concept on the great Bourse in Hamburg, Germany. In 1891, The Philadelphia Bourse Corporation was formed, with each member subscribing $1,000 to the project, by an issue of stock and mortgage. The Bourse motto was “buy, sell, ship via Philadelphia”.

The building was one of the first steel-framed buildings to be constructed. Three types of masonry were used on the facade: Carlisle redstone, Pompeian buff brick and terra cotta. Inside were large columns and pilasters leading to a balcony surrounding the main floor. Bow-top girders were used to support a skylight at the third floor.

The original tenants included the American Telephone and Telegraphy, Moore and McCormick Steamships lines, grain dealers and export agents. The Bourse was also home to the Commercial Exchange, the Maritime Exchange, Grocers and Importers Exchange and the Board of Trade.

Quotations from all markets of the world and the latest financial news were received by telegraph. Pneumatic tubes connected the Bourse directly with the United States Post Office. A trading clock signaled the end of every business day.

Kaiserman Company, Inc. purchased The Philadelphia Bourse Building in 1979, renaming it “The Bourse” and adapting it as a retail and office complex. The restoration took three years to complete at a cost of $20 million, twenty times greater than the original construction cost. Today, it is one of Philadelphia’s leading commercial complexes, home to 27 retail and food service stores and more than 35 businesses.

Independence National Historical Park preserves several sites associated with the American Revolution. Administered by the National Park Service, the 45-acre park was authorized in 1948, and established on July 4, 1956.

Independence National Park Historic District National Register #66000675 (1966)
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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Old Post Office ~ St. Louis



The Customhouse and Post Office was designed by Alfred Mullett in 1873. It is one of two surviving Federal buildings by Mullett. The other one is the Old Executive Office Building next to the White House. You can't see it from this perspective, but there is a large domed portion on the other side of the building.

This building's adaptive reuse was part of a huge controversy between the Landmarks Association of St Louis and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Basically the developers interested in the adaptive reuse of the Old Post Office wanted to demolish the historic Century Building for a parking structure (which is what eventually happened). The National Trust sided with the developers horror, and the Century Building came tumbling down.

The Customhouse and Post Office (Old Post Office) is on the National Register #68000053, and it is also a National Historic Landmark.



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:drool:
 

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Old Executive Office, Washington DC





American Supreme Court




 

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