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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GREAT HANOI
...to become world's greenest city and world's first sustainable city


Hanoi Capital Construction Master Plan to 2030 and Vision to 2050.

http://greathanoi.org/ (u/c)

Hanoi's area was 920.97 sqkm, after expansion it is 3.349sqkm (Greater Hanoi/ agglomeration: ~13.000sqkm) now. The population was 3.4 million people, but it is 6.2 million people after expansion now. Hanoi is one of the 30 biggest cities in the world.

planning team: Perkins Eastman (US), Posco E&C (Korea), Jina Architects (Korea)













Expansion in the news:

Ha Noi plans to become an ‘original city’, interview

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Old centers and historic buildings will be an important basis for Ha Noi to become the most original of cities
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Our important idea is creating a live document permitting flexible changes and living with those changes.
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Hanoi six months after expansion

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Hanoi: How many idle projects to be withdrawn?

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Hanoi urban plan to divvy up city

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PPJ’s experts said that the capital city’s plan needs to address numerous issues, including transport, public spaces, land management, and urban management. As a result, PPJ proposed a master plan that aims to enable sustainable development for Hanoi, with initiatives to develop a hefty green corridor around the city and new arrangements for transport and housing areas.

PPJ devised two different outlines for government leaders to consider, each with its own potential strengths and weaknesses, but both are based on the principle that a green corridor will cover 60 per cent of the area of the new capital city, leaving 40 per cent for urbanisation. This plan is calculated to enable sustainable development for a city with 10 million citizens by 2030.
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Hanoi has several unique features that need to be addressed. For example, after expansion, it has a wide spread system of villages, including many traditional craft villages that need to be preserved and developed. Meanwhile, its large agricultural land base is shrinking due to urbanisation, thus agricultural planning needs to be carefully addressed to ensure profit as well as tourism value and environmental needs.
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Cabinet briefing on new Hanoi

VietNamNet Bridge - Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung on April 24 outlined the importance of the capital keeping pace with Vietnam’s growing population, which is expected to reach 130 million within 40 years.

Dung was speaking Cabinet after receiving the first report from international consultants on the “Hanoi Capital Construction Master Plan to 2030 and Vision to 2050”.

A group of three foreign consultants were involved, Perkins Eastman from the US and the Republic of Korea companies, Posco E&C and Jina (PPJ). The Vietnam Institute for Architecture, Urban and Rural Planning (VIAP) als contributed.

Dung and his deputies, Nguyen Sinh Hung, Hoang Trung Hai and Pham Gia Khiem, as well as leaders of relevant ministries and agencies, were briefed on two major outlines, plan A and plan B, each of which incorporates strengths and weaknesses in urban planning.

But no matter which plan is selected, a green corridor will be set aside covering 60 percent of the total area of the Greater Hanoi.

The other 40 percent is for urbanisation to ensure the sustainable development for a metropolis of a 10 million population by 2030 that experts envisage.

PM Dung acknowledged the efforts of the consultants and asked them to complete their plans in detail so that they would work as the foundation for specific infrastructure development in the future.

Deputy PM Hoang Trung Hai and Hanoi authorities were required to provide the consultants with support and orientation to ensure the highest quality of the master plan’s design.

He said the completion of the Hanoi master plan must also take into account valuable contributions from local scientists and architects.

PPJ and VIAP have become consultants for the Hanoi Master Construction Plan under contracts worth a combined 6.4 million USD signed with the Ministry of Construction in December, 2008.

VietNamNet/VNA
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
1st report to the government

Hanoi: the first sustainable capital by 2030

source: Strange System Blog

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This is a project to establish a urban master plan for Hanoi to 2030, covering some 3345 km2. Just to put this area into perspective, it is 2 times the size of Greater London and 5 times the size of Seoul.

Capital Master Plan: A Nation’s Vision

A project of this scope is not really a urban planning or engineering project so much as a political, national vision project. Each nation’s capital is a statement of the nation’s philosophical inclinations. Washington DC represents the ideals upon which the US was founded. Seoul embodies, like it or not, the breakneck economic growth and now the technological innovations that are driving the nation. A city is always a sum of collective decisions whether they were good one of back ones, or none. So some capitals don’t have a clear direction which may be a negative reflection of that nation’s lack of leadership.

So what does Hanoi want to be? We propose it can be: The First Sustainable Capital. Ambitious? Yes. But if you understand that this is political/national philosophy project and not an engineering project, having a strong vision that the leadership can bring to the people is important.

Hanoi and Sustainability

Ideas of sustainability is not a foreign concept to Vietnam. The national motto is: Freedom, Independence and Happiness. Vietnam fought hard to maintain these values in the various wars throughout its history with China, France and most recently against the US. So sustaining their way of life and independence has been a central philosophy all along.

What we proposed was that Hanoi needs to expand the ideas of sustainability to embody all 4 pillars of sustainability: economic, environmental, social and cultural sustainability.

The first, economic is obvious. Vietnam has had a breathtaking growth. It went from a starving population just 10 years ago to becoming #2 rice exporter, #2 coffee exporter and #1 cashew nut exporter. The economy is strong so it is important to ensure that this growth continues. Vietnam has 2 major cities: Ho Chi Minh City (aka Saigon) and Hanoi. The Mekong Delta and HCMC is more of the industrial base of the nation. The 2 cities need to clearly identify roles. In Hanoi, industry should be promoted, but needs to transition to a knowledge-based industry. This is more becoming of the capital, where administration, cultural and higher education should be promoted.

Environmental sustainability is obviously important. The Asia Development Bank (ADB) sees Vietnam will be one of the counties that will be most affected by rising sea-levels as a direct result of climate change. Hanoi and HCMC are both in delta areas, which would mean that they will be hardest hit. Also water and air pollution, are major concerns, since waste water and industrial waste in Hanoi is hardly treated, and heavy motorcycle traffic is having a negative impact on air quality.

Social and cultural sustainability is less obvious. In the case of Seoul, since the 60’s economic growth has trumped all other aspects, and in the process, cultural and historic heritage were irretrievably lost. It is only recently that there are attempts to belated recover these assets. But what is once lost is manyfold harder to recover. Hanoi has such rich heritage, that was unintentionally relatively well-preserved due to the war and economic stagnation that followed. Hanoi has Chinese, French, Soviet and Vietnamese heritage and influences all in one city. The scale French colonial urban structure and colonial-style villas makes for a very interesting european city, while the Old Quarter makes for a uniquely Vietnamese experience all within walking distance of each other.

It’s apparent that Vietnam, given its economy, cannot invest in preserving its cultural assets as much as more developed nations. But what it can do is protect until it can discover and develop them.

Main concepts

Our methodology is based first on an assessment of the current conditions of Hanoi, then identifying the unique assets and potentials of Hanoi, then establishing a strategic framework to develop these assets while mitigating the challenges, applying international best practices adapted to the unique conditions in Hanoi. Pretty straight forward.

The analysis of the current conditions shows that there are many challenges that Hanoi needs to overcome. Traffic congestion, transportation, flooding, uncontrolled urban development, housing, new administration center are to name just some of the high priority issues.

It’s easy to fall into the trap of focusing the plan on finding solutions for these challenges. However if you look beyond, you realize that Hanoi and Vietnam has many assets that need to be protected, discovered and developed. The numerous cultural and historic sites in and around Hanoi need to be protected, and the way of life in the numerous craft villages outside Hanoi’s urban core need to be maintained to the degree possible.

Agricultural land protection

Most important, high-productivity agricultural land needs to be protected. It is easy to overlook this issue. Many countries including Korea made the decision to convert its agricultural land for urban use. The Philippines also made a similar decision and, in a simplistic way, this is how it went from being a rice exporter to now the world’s biggest rice importer with Vietnam being a major exporter of rice to the Philippines. Given the growing urban population and uncontrolled development, this is indeed a clear danger for Vietnam also.

At its heart, it more a matter of principle than practicality. It would nice to have a good portion of the food resources needed for Hanoi to be cultivated and provided for from nearby farms, however this is not at all practical, given the projected population growth, and its appetite for new land for housing, industrial and commercial use. Also given how labor intensive it is to cultivated rice crops, it doesn’t make economic sense for the small-scale rice farms to try to supply Hanoi.

What’s more crucial is how the land is converted to non-agricultural use: High productivity agricultural land should be identified and only low productivity agricultural land be converted. If this principle is enforced in the capital, it should have a ripple effect on all the other cities in Vietnam which are growing and facing the same issue of land conversion. This will establish a principle that values agricultural land as a national principle and security. Not many countries around the world has the luxury or security of being able to feed its whole population from home grown produce. This is one asset that Vietnam should fight to protect and Hanoi can set the standard. Not many countries are a leader in anything. Vietnam should maintain its lead in agriculture as a matter of national priority, and work to build up other areas such as industry and technology to the same level.

Green Corridor

So how to achieve these goals and principles in an economically and environmentally sustainable way? Based on the current conditions, in order to establish a sustainable growth strategy, our main concept is centered around the establishment of the Green Corridor of Hanoi to the west of the previous Hanoi’s urban core. The Green Corridor follows the flood plains either side of the Day and Tich Rivers.

The idea of Green Corridor is fundamentally different from a green belt. A green belt is static and strictly controlled. However a green corridor is more flexible in that it allows for certain “green” activities to occur through maintaining many levels of protection. Protection can range from strict control to “conservation-based development” which accommodates pre-existing craft villages to function. The Green Corridor also moves to protect the high productivity agricultural land that exists around the Day and Tich River flood plains.

The Green Corridor will also function in much the same way a green belt does in Seoul or London in establishing a boundary around the urban areas to control uncontrolled urban sprawl development. This will give satellite cities the opportunity to develop in a more competitive and compact way and
allow the depopulation of the current Hanoi center and give public transportation a chance to function as it links the new urban centers with the old. The big added benefit of course is the open green space for future generations to enjoy.

With the Green Corridor acting as an anchor, so called “innovation clusters” can be developed to tap new potential and opportunities in eco-tourism, high-tech agriculture and cross-functional cultural-education-technology activity zones.

The biggest challenge for all this is the 700+ approved projects in Hanoi in various stages of planning and implementation speckled around the whole area. Currently all these projects have been put on hold pending the approval of master plan. Negotiating, accommodating or even canceling some of these projects which have strong vested political interests will be hardest part of the plan. Now that we have proposed the general framework for development, more details on how to reconcile the plan with the existing projects is what the next stage and the next report in July will have to address.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hanoi: Think Different

source: Strange System

Hanoi Panorama



The view from the penthouse suite balcony of the Somerset Grand Hanoi, a.k.a Hanoi Towers is pretty amazing.

We’ve been looking for more economic alternatives for accommodations in Hanoi since we’ll visiting and working in Hanoi on a regular basis for the next year and a half, when we came across this one. It didn’t hurt to just look. It’s located on the 25th floor of the Hanoi Towers and has its own balcony overlooking downtown Hanoi.

The apartment was nice, but what was more surprising was the view: how few high-rises block your view. You would never get a view like this in Seoul, or any other major East Asian city. Hanoi is comparatively unspoiled and the government has done a good job resisting the pressures of development of Hanoi’s downtown area.

More Paris than Seoul

I had the strong sense that Hanoi has the potential of looking more like Paris than Seoul or Singapore in the future. Cities like Paris have many charms but the consistent density and height of its buildings reinforce its appeal and identity. The low-rise condition of Hanoi makes the city seem more humane and beautiful.

The other feature of the view that amazed me was how much greenery there already exists in Hanoi. Two factors contribute to this: tree-cover along major streets and trees that line the numerous mini-lakes you find around Hanoi. You don’t really realize how many lakes there are in Hanoi until you see the satellite image of downtown Hanoi. In the image below, I have indicated with stars all the lakes in the downtown area. The yellow star indicates Hoan Kiem Lake which is by far the most important and beloved lake in Hanoi and represents the spiritual center of the city. Once you can look past the weathered buildings and the ubiquitous motorcycle traffic, you realize that water, trees and nature seem to be at the heart and very identity of Hanoi.

Seoul: a failed model

If you look at Seoul, there are many relics from the past dotted around the city. You have the royal palaces, the gates to the walled city and names of places from the past city fabric buried under the new infrastructure. But rarely do they have space to breath. For example, you have the massive, ugly, Rafael Viñoly-designed monster, the Samsung Jongno Tower, towering over and suffocating Boshingak, the ancient building that houses the bell that announces the start of the New Year. In the history of Seoul’s development, growth and modernizing were given high priority over preservation and heritage. Hanok, the traditional Korean houses which were pervasive all throughout Seoul, were viewed as inferior and backwardly and replaced by concrete “A-pa-tu” apartment blocks. It is ironic that Hanok’s are now making a comeback. Jongno and Cheongyecheon, at the heart of the city were given over to the development of high-rise office blocks, and the identity of Seoul was gradually lost. What’s the point in belated attempts to recover the heritage when it has been lost already?


Ugly Seoul


The danger is replicating the Seoul model elsewhere. It is a failed model that is lopsided towards only serving growth and economy and not the social and cultural well-being of its inhabitants. If urban planning and design are taken only as engineering exercises, the solution will be Seoul. But the city is not an engineering project. Even more so when that city happens to be the capital of a nation. The engineering approach is the easy thing to do: to forecast growth and model housing and infrastructure needs and configure the city to efficiently handle those growing needs. In an unintentional imperialistic gesture, Korean or Japanese engineers will develop Hanoi based on what they know and experienced - in the image of the likes of Seoul, Tokyo. They cannot dream what Hanoi can be.

If you start thinking about all the issues that need to be considered, the mind goes into a state of overload and paralysis. One needs to consider the issues of what to preserve, how to implement regulations, how to solve the traffic, transportation and motorcycle issue, how to promote development… and the list goes on.

People First


The solution may be simple: put people single-mindedly first. This seems to have worked well for Bogata, which emerged from a crime-stricken capital of a civil war-torn country, into a city that has one of the best transportation infrastructure and urban bicycle programs in the world under the brief tenure of Mayor Enrique Peñalosa (1998-2001). The lesson here is, it’s still ok dream big and to imagine a better future. But is takes an enormous amount of courage and leadership.

What to do in Hanoi? At the very least, Hanoi can freeze or restrict development in the downtown area for the next 20 years. In 20 years, the Vietnamese economy will be much stronger, and at a point where they will have the means as well as the methods to do a much better job caring for the cultural heritage embodied in Hanoi. Though painful now, the future generations of Hanoi and Vietnam will thank us if we do that.

Think Different

Most developing nations can only see into the short-term future, and end up sacrificing their heritage for development and growth. All the developed cities in East Asia and Southeast Asia attest to this. Hanoi can be different. It has the potential of becoming the only remaining well preserved, sustainable gem of a city in all of Asia.

Encouraging is the fact that in Hanoi, both national, local officials and academics understand this already. But there is mounting pressure from the private sector to develop and tap the real-estate value of downtown. Once you open that tap, Hanoi will likely see the unpleasant effects flooding in uncontrolled urban development on top of the natural flooding it experiences regularly.

The challenge here is to balance preservation, quality of life, urban identity with the pressures for growth and development. This is something I’ll be thinking very hard about for the next year, as our team works hard on developing the Master Urban Plan for the Hanoi Capital.

A good place to start is by first listening to the people of Hanoi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Experts surprised by audacity of proposed Hanoi master plan

source: VietNamNet

VietNamNet Bridge – Hanoi City is giving positive consideration to implementing a long-term urban development plan it has commissioned from an international consortium. However, the draft plan is drawing fire from Vietnamese experts.


The green belt, which accounts for 60 percent of Hanoi’s area, suggested by PPJ.

Early in July, Hanoi authorities reviewed an ambitious plan for Hanoi’s development to 2030, with a ‘vision’ to 2050. The plan calls for the city’s evolution as ‘the first sustainable capital city.’ It is the work of PPJ, a consortium made up of the US design and architecture firm Perkins Eastman and Posco Engineering &Construction and Jina from South Korea. The Vietnam Institute for Architecture, Urban and Rural Planning (VIAP) also contributed.

The proposal aims at development that embodies four ‘pillars of sustainability’ – economic, environmental, social and cultural, and emphasizes preservation of a ‘green corridor’ in the rich rice growing areas of the former Ha Tay Province. (Ha Tay, to the west of the city center, was annexed to Hanoi a year ago.)

PPJ experts say that the capital city’s plan needs to address many concrete issues, including transport, public spaces, land management, and urban management.

PPJ suggested two options, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Integral to both is the concept of a ‘green corridor’ that will cover 60 percent of the area of the new capital city, leaving 40 percent for intensive development.

Two-thirds of the green corridor area will be strictly protected against industrial and commercial development, while development in the rest of that area will be consonant with its ‘green’ character. The area for urban development will be shared equally between new towns and existing urbanized areas. This plan is calculated to enable sustainable development of a city with 10 million citizens by 2030.

In option A, two big satellite cities will be developed adjacent to a 10-12 kilometer wide green corridor in the rich agricultural areas near the Day and Tich rivers. A national administrative centre, considerably distant from the current centre in Hanoi’s Ba Dinh and Hoan Kiem districts, will catalyze development along the Red River.

The second option involves less radical departures from current development plans. It centers development on a national administrative centre as the nut, surrounded by satellite cities and residential areas of smaller scale.

Vietnamese experts are quick to comment

The director of the Institute for Construction Planning, La Thi Kim Ngan, considers both options to be infeasible. Ngan said a new national administrative centre located between the Day and Tich rivers is too far from the current one. This area is more suitable for agriculture. Or, if the administrative centre is located to the east of the current city center in Gia Lam district, it can only be accessed from the city’s centre by bridges across the Red River.

Ngan said that the most suitable location for the national administrative centre is the area to the west of West Lake (from the Tay Ho peninsula to Hoai Duc or Tu Liem district).

Hanoi City Chairman Nguyen The Thao said that a national administrative centre that is not closely connected to the current city center will be a ‘dead city,’ so it should be based in the Tay Ho Tay area (west of the West Lake).

Thao asked PPJ to clarify its conception of ‘green corridor’ to avoid eliminating existing villages.

Other experts also said that the ‘green corridor’ idea is interesting but it must be explained clearly.

Dao Ngoc Nghiem, Hanoi’s former chief architect, and Huynh Dang Hi, of the Urban Planning Association both commented that PPJ didn’t discuss population density and population distribution, a necessary foundation for developing infrastructure.

Tran Trong Hanh, a Hanoi People’s Council member and the former rector of the Hanoi Architecture University, said: “I didn’t participate in this project but the consulting unit asked for my opinion. Firstly, I wonder if the period for development of the plan, only about a year, isn’t too short. The scientific foundations for the ideas of PPJ were not proved convincingly”.

Hanh also said that the plan does not differentiate between the urban and general development plans. In addition, economic and social development plans for Hanoi don’t reach to 2050 so this ‘planning vision’ may not match with other plans in the future. As for ‘green areas,’ these have already been foreseen in the 1998 Hanoi development plan and are nothing new.

Hanoi, Hanh said, does not need to use 40 percent of its land for urban development in order to accommodate its projected population. He suggested the rate for urbanization be held to 10-20 percent.

Hanh believes the national administrative centre should be maintained in the current Ba Dinh – Hoan Kiem districts. Other places should be considered as satellites.

In late April, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and government leaders considered PPJ’s first report, which was less detailed but not much different from the one presented to the Hanoi authorities last week.

While preparing the plan, PPJ held many surveys, seminars and conferences, including international experts, on issues relating to the plan and analysed urban planning experiences from 15 global cities.

According to PPJ, Hanoi has several unique features that need to be addressed. For example, particularly since the annexation of Ha Tay and other adjacent districts last year, Hanoi has a widespread system of villages, including many traditional craft villages that ought to be preserved and developed. Meanwhile, the city’s large agricultural land base is shrinking due to urbanisation, thus agricultural planning needs to be carefully addressed to it continues to thrive in the green corridor, together with infrastructure to add tourism value and serve environmental needs.

PPJ and VIAP have become consultants for the Hanoi Master Construction Plan under contracts worth a combined 6.4 million US dollars. The contracts were signed with the Ministry of Construction in December, 2008.

It is envisioned that the plan will be approved by the Government in time for its promulgation on the occasion of the 1000th Thang Long – Hanoi anniversary (October 10, 2010).


VietNamNet/VNE/TTXVN
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hanoi to have streets named after 36 capitals

source: SGGP

Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung recently asked Hanoi People’s Committee to research the possibility of establishing a new quarter, including 36 new streets named after various national capitals from around the world.


Each street will have architectural features of each country that it is named for that country's capital.

To Anh Tuan, director of the Hanoi’s Department of Planning and Architecture, said establishing a new quarter with the names of capitols needs precautions and base decisions on diplomatic and economic relations between Vietnam and other countries.

Hanoi is widely known for its old quarter, often referred to as the 36 old streets, which covers 100 hectares in Hoan Kiem District – the capitol’s center.

Last year, the Government approved a plan to expand Hanoi.

The whole of Red River Delta Province of Ha Tay which is was merged into Hanoi.

Some districts form northern provinces of Vinh Phuc and Hoa Binh were also added to the capitall’s territory.

Once the project is completed, Hanoi will cover 334,470 hectares and have a population of around 6.2 million people. The resolution was put into effect on August 1, 2008.


By A.Phuong - Translated by T.Huong
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PM hears Hanoi’s master plan through 2030
Saturday ,Aug 22,2009, Posted at: 16:26(GMT+7)

source: SGGP

Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has asked international consultants to focus on preserving the tangible and intangible values of Hanoi ’s old quarter and developing linkages between the city and other localities while working on a master plan for the city toward 2030.

The PM made the request on August 21 after hearing the international consultancy group PPJ’s report on the master plan for the capital city through 2030 with a vision for 2050.

The gathering, the second of its kind, was also attended by Deputy PMs Nguyen Sinh Hung and Hoang Trung Hai, and leaders of relevant agencies and Hanoi authorities.

The PPJ introduced the leaders to the third strategy for Hanoi , which combines the advantages of the previous two strategies, to expand the new urban centre to the west of Hanoi and place the national administrative centre to the west of the city centre.

Showing approval for this strategy, PM Dung requested the PPJ to continue refining the master plan for Hanoi to expand the city’s space to include a key metropolis which is surrounded by satellite townships such as Hoa Lac, Son Tay, Xuan Mai, Quoc Oai, Phu Xuyen, Dong Anh, Me Linh and Soc Son.

He asked that 30 percent of the city’s space be reserved for the development of urban areas and the remaining 70 percent for the city’s green belt.

He required the upgrade and preservation of old centres together with tangible cultural sites and intangible values, particularly works located in the old quarter in the process of urban development.

The PM requested the PPJ make clearer, in its upcoming report, its road, railway and waterway infrastructure development plan in order to manage traffic jams and ensure inter-regional linkages for the city.

He also asked the consultancy group to map out a flood drainage plan for the city and provide more details about functional areas, such as the administrative centre, the urban centre and the metropolitan area.

The third hearing on the PPJ’s report on Hanoi ’s master plan will be in September and October so the final report can be submitted to the National Assembly by the end of this year.


Source: VNA
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
PM pushes Ha Noi master plan

source: Viet Nam News

Ministries urged to complete construction plan to 2030.

HA NOI — Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung instructed relevant ministries, agencies and the capital city to continue efforts to complete the "Ha Noi Construction Master Plan to 2030 with Vision to 2050" at a meeting yesterday.

Responding to the second report from international consultants regarding the urban area Master Plan along the Hong River, the PM specifically said 30 per cent of Ha Noi’s increased area should be turned into central and satellite urban areas and the remaining 70 per cent, green corridors.

Dung and his deputies, Nguyen Sinh Hung and Hoang Trung Hai, as well as leaders of relevant ministries and agencies, were briefed by the consultants on three major Master Plan outlines.

Participants in the meeting agreed to choose an outline incorporating the strengths of all three options in which the central urban area would be widened to the west and the national administration centre would be far from the central urban area.

Dung said that it is necessary to clearly analyse the strengths of this Master Plan to reduce weaknesses found in other world cities.

He affirmed that planning the capital’s urban environment needs to follow the goal that Ha Noi will be a civilised and modern capital for the country’s future population of 120 million.

Ha Noi has been expanded to more than 3,300sq.km since last August and now has the population of more than 6.2 million people.

Dung said that regarding urban development, all rivers and lakes would need to be clean, natural and beautiful, and ancient and cultural projects would require upgrading and preservation.

He asked the international consultants to pay attention to Ha Noi’s connectivity with other cities and to clarify methods for constructing the capital’s infrastructure such as roads, railways and underground projects during their analysis, adjustments and completion of the master plan.

A group of three foreign consultants was involved in developing the Master Plan: Perkins Eastman from the US; and South Korean companies, Posco E&C and Jina (PPJ). The Viet Nam Institute for Architecture, Urban and Rural Planning (VIAP) also contributed.

The consultants were also asked to propose infrastructure details that would ensure smooth flow of traffic, the connectivity between Ha Noi and other cities and flood drainage plans by October.

Dung instructed the Ha Noi People’s Committee to continue checking licensed projects to assess whether or not they should be implemented and to mobilise funds to develop infrastructure such as an underground railway or Noi Bai Airport upgrades.

He also assigned the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources to develop a strategic assessment report of Ha Noi’s Environment and other relevant authorities to prepare for establishing a national appraisal board for the final Master Plan.

The plan, estimated to cost US$7 billion, would span 40km, separated into four development areas, including more than 2,000ha of land for an urban zone, a commerce and trading area, public lands and areas for international festivals and sports events.

The Master Plan will be submitted to the National Assembly by 2010. — VNS
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trees to cover 62 percent of Hanoi’s area

source: VietNamNet

VietNamNet Bridge – Deputy PM Hoang Trung Hai on November 21 listened to a third report detailing Hanoi’s comprehensive construction plan till 2030 plus an outlined vision up to 2050.



Acquiring PM Nguyen Tan Dung’s guidance, the international consulting group (Perkins Eastman, Posco E&C and Jina) presented in details the plan, especially the difference between the previous and the latest plans.

PPJ’s representative said that the plan must solve matters and challenges that Hanoi has to confront, such as urban traffic, population, preservation of old architectural works and historical value and the urban landscapes.

Besides the core urban area, the expanded urban area and the green corridor, international consulters suggested developing five satellite urban areas, including Soc Son, Phu Xuyen, Xuan Mai, Hoa Lac and Son Tay. The central idea of this plan is preserving the green corridor that will cover 62 percent of the capital’s city area.

According to PPJ, the most important aspect to Hanoi is its network of rivers, lakes and trees, which need to be maintained and developed appropriately.

Minister of Transportation Ho Nghia Dung said consultants must pay attention to necessary facilities for pedestrians. He said that at present, facilities for pedestrians are neglected. The use of too many vehicles would cause great traffic conflicts, affecting the urban environment. The Minister also said build the system of highways and develop the public transport system is urgent.

Hanoi’s chairman Nguyen The Thao emphasized three things that the plan should focus on: the connection of transport infrastructure, the green corridor and the preservation of the Hanoi’s old quarter.

Deputy PM Hoang Trung Hai appreciated the project, saying that it highlights the vision of development and forecasts factors related to population and infrastructure.

The Deputy PM noted that the plan should have a clear itinerary and go further into details. He asked the consulting group to complete the plan to report to the government next week. The Construction Ministry will upgrade and assess the project in December 2009.

VietNamNet/Government’s website
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
PM wants master plan completed for Ha Noi

source: Viet Nam News

HA NOI — Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has asked related agencies to quickly complete the master plan for expanded Ha Noi.

The Prime Minister did so yesterday at the third hearing on the master plan, which takes into account city development up to the year 2030 with a vision to 2050.

Dung asked the plan’s consultants, PPJ international consultancy partnership, to continue refining the plan for Ha Noi, and to expand the city’s spaces and create a key metropolis which is surrounded by satellite townships.

Together with preserving and restoring historical and cultural relics, the plan must maintain the beauty of rivers and lakes around the city, he said.

To make the idea feasible, the PM asked the Ministry of Construction and the Ha Noi People’s Committee to instruct PPJ to more clearly articulate infrastructure planning, especially for railroads and roadways, and create a plan for a sustainable flood prevention system.

He also requested the consultants clearly define the percentage of land to be used for urban areas, buffer zones, a green belt, functional urban areas and rural areas as well as orientations for industry, agriculture and services development.

Dung instructed related ministries and agencies to propose policies and mechanisms to implement infrastructure projects as soon as possible, and the Ha Noi People’s Committee to carry out effective work on site clearance.

The final master plan will be submitted to the National Assembly for approval in early 2010.—VNS
 

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Cảm ơn tq vì tất cả,bạn đã giới thiệu hình ảnh+thông tin về ViệtNam cho bạn bè trên thế giới đều biết tới ViệtNam ở các topic quốc tế. Great job! :cheers::banana: keep work!
 

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>>>GO>>>VIETNAM>>>
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1,672 Posts
Yeah, we need to grow some forest in the outskirt of Hanoi. I prefer forest and big trees to golf courses :lol:
 

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Senior and Head Filipino Mod
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19,130 Posts
Hanoi master plan goes online
A new website introducing “Hanoi Construction Master Plan Through 2030 With A Vision Towards 2050” has been launched.

Visitors can find information about the plan’s objects, the current stage of the construction and development of the capital, the planning borders and the orientation to develop the urban landscape, the orientation on housing developments, education planning and health care and public service networks.

The plan has been drafted by PPJ, a consortium formed by US architectural firm Perkins Eastman and South Korea’s Posco E&C and JINA.

The website is also open for comments from organizations, individuals and citizens to improve the master plan at http://hanoi.org.vn/planning/archives/date/2009/08.
http://vietnewsonline.vn/News/Society/12868/Hanoi-master-plan-goes-online.htm


Hanoi’s master plan through 2030 under scrutiny


Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has asked international consultants to focus on preserving the tangible and intangible values of Hano’s old quarter and developing linkages between the city and other localities while working on a master plan for the city toward 2030.

The PM made the request on August 21 after hearing the international consultancy group PPJ’s report on the master plan for the capital city through 2030 with a vision for 2050.

The gathering, the second of its kind, was also attended by Deputy PMs Nguyen Sinh Hung and Hoang Trung Hai, and leaders of relevant agencies and Hanoi authorities.

The PPJ introduced the leaders to the third strategy for Hanoi, which combines the advantages of the previous two strategies, to expand the new urban centre to the west of Hanoi and place the national administrative centre to the west of the city centre.
Showing approval for this strategy, PM Dung requested the PPJ to continue refining the master plan for Hanoi to expand the city’s space to include a key metropolis, which is surrounded by satellite townships such as Hoa Lac, Son Tay, Xuan Mai, Quoc Oai, Phu Xuyen, Dong Anh, Me Linh and Soc Son.

He asked that 30 percent of the city’s space be reserved for the development of urban areas and the remaining 70 percent for the city’s green belt.

He required the upgrade and preservation of old centres together with tangible cultural sites and intangible values, particularly works located in the old quarter in the process of urban development.

The PM requested the PPJ make clearer, in its upcoming report, its road, railway and waterway infrastructure development plan in order to manage traffic jams and ensure inter-regional linkages for the city.

He also asked the consultancy group to map out a flood drainage plan for the city and provide more details about functional areas, such as the administrative centre, the urban centre and the metropolitan area.

The third hearing on the PPJ’s report on Hanoi’s master plan will be in September and October so the final report can be submitted to the National Assembly by the end of this year.
http://www.hanoistay.com/Hanoi%E2%80%99s-master-plan-through-2030-under-scrutiny/
 

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i'm a hanoian
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10,140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
seeing the green area in the clip makes me smile :)
 
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