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I think the University of Cincinnati is underrated. It is a good school, but I don't think it promotes its self very well. For example in Cleveland you always here commercials about Ohio State and The University of Akron, but never do you here mention of The University of Cincinnati, but that may have more to do with people in the Southwest of Ohio and Northeast Ohio being something like polar opposites.
 

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University of Iowa. Top-rated medical and law schools, the only post-graduate degrees that garner real prestige.

All while Iowa State is FULL OF FARM-BOY NERDS.

And before one of you corrects me and says it's in the wrong "region"...I know it's not sitting directly on any of the Great Lakes, but has strong Great Lakes presence.
 

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Over-rated: Marquette.

It has good national name recognition, mostly because of success in NCAA basketball. It is popular with the Chicagoland crowd and a fair number of students come from the coasts. But aside from expensive tuition and an urban location I don't know what Marquette really has to offer over any other school, public or private.

Under-rated: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

This is a school that is relegated to the "hyphenated leagues" and is always seen as second fiddle to UW-Madison. But it's a strong school and has a number of programs that are among the best nationally. It will never truly compete with Madison, for sure, but it doesn't deserve to exist in any school's shadow.
 

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First off, I'm not trying to start a war here. However, Marquette as overrated? US News lists MU as 85th overall for universities which grant doctoral degrees. I realize that these types of rankings are not scientific but are useful for illustration and do have some merit.

As far as the graduate programs, the law school's dispute resolution program is ranked 11th. In 2002, the department of counseling and educational psychology was named the department of the year by the American Psychological Association. The physical therapy program is 16th while the nursing programs are 53rd and the school of education is 57th. Recently, MU was also listed as having one of the top 100 entrepreneurial programs. This is to name a few.

Marquette is expensive, yes. However, all private schools are because they do not receive state funding. Yet, many people like myself receive a fair share of university aid, bringing the cost per year closer to that of the state schools.

Most importantly, there is a very strong emphasis on faith and on volunteering. Every year over 80% of undergraduates perform some type of community service. I also like the fact that the liberal arts classes try to connect subject matter to real world issues, in the hope that students will become future leaders committed to serving others. I could go on, but this will do for now.
 

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MarquetteHoops said:
First off, I'm not trying to start a war here. However, Marquette as overrated? US News lists MU as 85th overall for universities which grant doctoral degrees. I realize that these types of rankings are not scientific but are useful for illustration and do have some merit.

As far as the graduate programs, the law school's dispute resolution program is ranked 11th. In 2002, the department of counseling and educational psychology was named the department of the year by the American Psychological Association. The physical therapy program is 16th while the nursing programs are 53rd and the school of education is 57th. Recently, MU was also listed as having one of the top 100 entrepreneurial programs. This is to name a few.

Marquette is expensive, yes. However, all private schools are because they do not receive state funding. Yet, many people like myself receive a fair share of university aid, bringing the cost per year closer to that of the state schools.

Most importantly, there is a very strong emphasis on faith and on volunteering. Every year over 80% of undergraduates perform some type of community service. I also like the fact that the liberal arts classes try to connect subject matter to real world issues, in the hope that students will become future leaders committed to serving others. I could go on, but this will do for now.
Fair enough.
 

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Until you have experienced Jesuit education first hand, you will never truly understand what sets MU apart from other public and private schools. Both MU and UWM serve the city of milwaukee well in their own unique ways.

As you said MU atracts alot of Chicagoland residents, well if Milwaukee and Chicago are going to work together more to help make the region stronger, I'm betting MU will play a role in it. If you have ever encountered a lawyer or dentist in milwaukee chances are they are connected to MU. MU being expensive is also a big misconception. For many people after all the aid is added in MU is cheaper than UWM.

UWM is a great option not only for milwaukee area residents, but also anyone around the state who wants an inexpensive urban university to higher their education. Even Madison can't beat UWM's location in the largest city in Wisconsin.

I actually think both schools are very underrated around the country.
 

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Washington University. Great university with highly rated programs and a huge endowment providing funding for excellent research facilities, but very few have heard of it or could tell you where it was located.
 

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Badgers77 said:
Like everything in the midwest, most midwestern universities are underrated.
I agree. I think the Big 10 holds its position very well though. Only the east and west coast are known to have better schools.
 

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Depends on what you are looking for, and what you think makes a good school.

For instance, I once ranked schools on the following criteria:
- Majority of students are from wealthy families (i.e. $150k-200k/yr+)
- Students who never really had to work a hard job in their life (having no job at all is preferable, but cushy jobs like working with Uncle Trevor as a temp at the investment firm pass to a degree)
- % of students who went to private high school
- % of white students not for agricultural or rural areas
- Students with the opportunity to travel abroad multiple times has a child (trips most other kids could only dream of)
- Students likely to be suicidal if forced to work manual labor for just a week
- Students who never have to worry whether they can come back the following year, simply from financial reasons.

And yet, strangely enough, my list using the above criteria to ranks schools, and the list produced by the US News had an amazingly high correlation. Anyway, using my criteria the Big 10 schools are VASTLY overrated when compared to their East Coast Counterparts, as the B10 schools score way worse in those categories than even many of the lesser known East Coast Schools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
RonnieJonez said:
I agree. I think the Big 10 holds its position very well though. Only the east and west coast are known to have better schools.
I wouldn't say that the West coast has better schools than the Great Lakes. I'd match them pretty evenly. If you're comparing solely Big Ten schools to Pac 10 schools, I give a clear edge to the Big Ten, because it's clearly stronger from top to bottom. With the Pac 10, you have a very steep drop off from UW/USC to the bottom half of Oregon, Oregon State, Arizona State, Washington State. I think the two lowest ranked schools in the Big Ten (MSU and IU) would comfortably rank in the middle of the Pac 10.
 
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